FEBS Journal

Cover image for Vol. 280 Issue 12

June 2013

Volume 280, Issue 12

Pages i–iii, 2729–2946

  1. Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Minireview series
    5. Minireview
    6. Original Articles
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
    1. You have free access to this content
      Front Cover (page i)

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08782.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Receptors on cell surfaces: Epidermal growth factor receptor in different configurations simulated on a membrane Reproduced with kind permission from Johannes Kaestner, Computational Biochemistry Group, Institute of Theoretical Chemistry.

  2. Editorial Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Minireview series
    5. Minireview
    6. Original Articles
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
    1. You have free access to this content
      Editorial Information (pages ii–iii)

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08782_1.x

  3. Minireview series

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Minireview series
    5. Minireview
    6. Original Articles
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
    1. You have free access to this content
      Membrane dynamics in physiology and disease (page 2729)

      Matthias P. Wymann and Kai Simons

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12322

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The composition and dynamics of cellular membranes determine intra- and extracellular signaling events, and modulate a variety of cellular states including proliferation, survival, migration and more. Eight minireviews covering some aspects of the ESF EuroMEMBRANE programme and conference elucidate phosphoinositide signaling, membrane sorting, topography, lipid dynamics modeling, and mass spectroscopy methods to enlarge the known lipidome.

  4. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Minireview series
    5. Minireview
    6. Original Articles
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
    1. You have free access to this content
      Class III phosphatidylinositol 3–kinase and its catalytic product PtdIns3P in regulation of endocytic membrane traffic (pages 2730–2742)

      Camilla Raiborg, Kay O. Schink and Harald Stenmark

      Article first published online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12116

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      Class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-III) and its catalytic product phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) are central regulators of endocytic membrane traffic. PtdIns3P recruits specific effector proteins, most of which contain FYVE or PX domains, to promote endocytosis, endosome fusion, endosome motility, and endosome maturation, as well as cargo sorting to lysosomes, the biosynthetic pathway or the plasma membrane.

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      Tethering complexes in the endocytic pathway: CORVET and HOPS (pages 2743–2757)

      Jachen A. Solinger and Anne Spang

      Article first published online: 21 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12151

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      Endocytosis and transport through the endosomal system are essential processes involved in cell signaling and cell-cell communication. In this review, we focus the function and regulation of two membrane tethering complexes, CORVET and HOPS, present on endosomal membranes. Although most knowledge to date comes from studies in yeast, we extend our discussion to metazoans.

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      Mouse models of PIK3CA mutations: one mutation initiates heterogeneous mammary tumors (pages 2758–2765)

      Shany Koren and Mohamed Bentires-Alj

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12175

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      The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway is frequently deregulated in human cancer. PIK3CA, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit p110α of PI3K, is mutated in ~30% of breast cancers. Here, we describe current mouse models harboring the hotspot mutation PIK3CA H1047R in the mammary gland and discuss differences in tumor latency and pathogenesis.

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      What does S-palmitoylation do to membrane proteins? (pages 2766–2774)

      Sanja Blaskovic, Mathieu Blanc and F. Gisou van der Goot

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12263

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      S-palmitoylation is the reversible addition of a C16 acyl chain to cysteines. With a focus of transmembrane proteins, we review the current understanding of this modification and its reported consequences. Many of these are, however, likely to be secondary effects. Four non-mutually exclusive mechanistic consequences of palmitoylation have recently emerged and are discussed.

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      Consequences of membrane topography (pages 2775–2784)

      Ingela Parmryd and Björn Önfelt

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12209

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      Cell membranes are convoluted into submicrometer ruffles, which are impossible to resolve by most experimental techniques. Here we discuss the importance of considering such subresolution membrane organization when interpreting experimental data and give some examples of techniques where membrane topography can be probed. Finally we speculate what consequences ruffling could have for cellular processes, e. g. receptor signaling.

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      Molecular dynamics simulations of the interactions of medicinal plant extracts and drugs with lipid bilayer membranes (pages 2785–2805)

      Wojciech Kopeć, Jelena Telenius and Himanshu Khandelia

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12286

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      Several small drugs and medicinal plant extracts have a wide range of useful pharmacological properties, which cannot be ascribed to binding to a single protein target alone. In this review, we survey recent MD simulations of small drug-like molecules with membranes, and provide a biophysical description of possible routes of membrane-mediated pharmacological effects of drugs.

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      Oxidized phosphatidylcholines in membrane-level cellular signaling: from biophysics to physiology and molecular pathology (pages 2806–2816)

      Roman Volinsky and Paavo K. J. Kinnunen

      Article first published online: 17 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12247

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      Recent developments in our understanding of the biophysical properties of oxidized phospholipids are providing unprecedented views on their involvement in processes such as apoptosis, suggesting a key role for these lipids in the execution phase, with deterioration of the permeability barrier function of lipid bilayers. Hypothetically, lipid oxidation may also contribute to the cytotoxicity of anti-cancer drugs and γ-radiation.

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      On the future of mass-spectrometry-based lipidomics (pages 2817–2829)

      Ursula Loizides-Mangold

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12202

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      One of the great challenges in lipid research will be to understand how the enormous complexity of lipid homeostasis is maintained. Genetic approaches combined with mass-spectrometry-based lipidomics will help to elucidate how cells create and maintain their non-random lipid distribution within tissues, cells, organelles and lipid bilayers.

  5. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Minireview series
    5. Minireview
    6. Original Articles
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
    1. The anti-inflammatory compound BAY-11-7082 is a potent inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases (pages 2830–2841)

      Navasona Krishnan, Gyula Bencze, Philip Cohen and Nicholas K. Tonks

      Article first published online: 9 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12283

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      The anti-inflammatory compound BAY-11-7082 has been reported to inhibit IκB kinase activity. Here, we demonstrated that BAY-11-7082 was a potent, irreversible, cell-permeable inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), revealing its potential as a new probe for chemical biology approaches to study PTP function. Its capacity to inhibit PTPs may contribute to the many biological effects of BAY-11-7082.

    2. pH-dependent disruption of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and model membranes by the human antimicrobial peptides hepcidin 20 and 25 (pages 2842–2854)

      Giuseppantonio Maisetta, Alberto Vitali, Mariano A. Scorciapino, Andrea C. Rinaldi, Raffaele Petruzzelli, Franca L. Brancatisano, Semih Esin, Annarita Stringaro, Marisa Colone, Carla Luzi, Argante Bozzi, Mario Campa and Giovanna Batoni

      Article first published online: 9 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12288

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      The human hepcidin 25 (hep-25) and its isoform hepcidin 20 (hep-20) are histidine-containing, cystein rich, β-sheet structured peptides endowed with antimicrobial activity which is highly enhanced at acidic pH. The data obtained by using different approaches strongly suggested that the mode of hep-25 and hep-20 action and their ability to perturb Escherichia coli and model membranes is markedly pH-dependent.

    3. The single C-terminal helix of human phospholipid scramblase 1 is required for membrane insertion and scrambling activity (pages 2855–2869)

      Vincent G. Francis, Abdul M. Mohammed, Gopala K. Aradhyam and Sathyanarayana N. Gummadi

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12289

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      Phospholipid scramblases constitute a family of homologous proteins named as hPLSCR1-hPLSCR4. The C-terminal helix (CTH) is presently close to the EF-hand motif in the scramblase homologues indicating that it may play an important role in Ca2+ binding. This study shows that CTH is required for membrane insertion, Ca2+ co-ordination and also plays an important role in the functional conformation of hPLSCR1.

    4. In vitro reconstitution of complexes between pro-matrix metalloproteinase-9 and the proteoglycans serglycin and versican (pages 2870–2887)

      Nabin Malla, Eli Berg, Achilleas D. Theocharis, Gunbjørg Svineng, Lars Uhlin-Hansen and Jan-Olof Winberg

      Article first published online: 9 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12291

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      THP-1 cells produce proMMP-9·chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSPG) complexes. ProMMP-9·CSPG complexes were reconstituted in vitro with the proteoglycans serglycin and versican. Both SDS-stable reduction sensitive and SDS-soluble complexes were formed. SDS-stable complexes lacked intermolecular disulphide bridges. PG-core protein interacted with the PEX and FnII regions in proMMP-9. SDS-stable and SDS-soluble complexes involved different regions in the PEX domain.

    5. Robust autoactivation, chymotrypsin C independence and diminished secretion define a subset of hereditary pancreatitis-associated cationic trypsinogen mutants (pages 2888–2899)

      Andrea Geisz, Péter Hegyi and Miklós Sahin-Tóth

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12292

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      In the present study we demonstrate that hereditary pancreatitis-associated mutations in the activation peptide of human cationic trypsinogen robustly increase autoactivation and this effect is not dependent on chymotrypsin C (CTRC), as previously observed for other clinically relevant mutations. Furthermore, we find that the markedly increased autoactivation is mitigated by diminished secretion of the activation peptide mutants.

    6. The monomeric state of the proton-coupled folate transporter represents the functional unit in the plasma membrane (pages 2900–2915)

      Phaneendra K. Duddempudi, Prachi Nakashe, Michael P. Blanton and Michaela Jansen

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12293

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      Human proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) was heterologously expressed in CHO cells and X. laevis oocytes. In both expression systems PCFT was functional and the predominant PCFT protomer on the plasma membrane was determined to be monomeric by both blue-native PAGE and cross-linking experiments.

    7. Protein oligomers studied by solid-state NMR – the case of the full-length nucleoid-associated protein histone-like nucleoid structuring protein (pages 2916–2928)

      Marie Renault, Jesús García, Tiago N. Cordeiro, Marc Baldus and Miquel Pons

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12297

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      Nucleoid-associated proteins recognize DNA shapes by forming oligomers that allow for multiple and, at the same time, specific protein-DNA contacts. Such oligomers are difficult to crystallize and too large for liquid-state NMR. Here we show that solid-state NMR provides new structural information on full-length H-NS oligomers validating and complementing previous structural studies on truncated constructs.

    8. Sp1 and c-Myc regulate transcription of BMI1 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (pages 2929–2944)

      Hong-Bo Wang, Gui-Hong Liu, Hua Zhang, Shan Xing, Li-Juan Hu, Wei-Feng Zhao, Bo Xie, Man-Zhi Li, Bo-Hang Zeng, Yingqiu Li and Mu-Sheng Zeng

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12299

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We characterized the core promoter regions and identified Sp1 and c-Myc as transcription factors of BMI1 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Sp1 and c-Myc promoted Bmi1 expression in NPC cells and were correlated with Bmi-1 in NPEC/NPC cells or NPC tissue specimens. These findings provide new insights into the role of Sp1 and c-Myc on BMI1 transcription in NPC.

  6. Author index

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Minireview series
    5. Minireview
    6. Original Articles
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
    1. You have free access to this content
      Author index (page 2945)

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08781.x

  7. Table of Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Minireview series
    5. Minireview
    6. Original Articles
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
    1. Table of Contents (page 2946)

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12351

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