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FEBS Journal

Cover image for Vol. 280 Issue 16

August 2013

Volume 280, Issue 16

Pages i–iii, 3723–3977

  1. Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
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      Front Cover (page i)

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08790.x

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      Engineering RNA-binding proteins to control biology by Y. Chen & G. Varani (pp. 3734–3754) and Y. Wang et al. (pp. 3755–3767).

  2. Editorial Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
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      Editorial Information (pages ii–iii)

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08790_1.x

  3. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
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      AMPKbeta subunits: more than just a scaffold in the formation of AMPK complex (pages 3723–3733)

      Pascual Sanz, Teresa Rubio and Maria Adelaida Garcia-Gimeno

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12364

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      AMPKβ subunits are critical players in AMPK function, since they can regulate phosphorylation status and activity of the AMPK complex. AMPKβ1- and AMPKβ2-containing complexes differ in their capacity to be activated by specific drugs and also by the ability to undergo post-translational modifications. This selective behavior opens the possibility to design specific drugs that activate AMPK complexes containing specific β-isoforms.

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      Engineering RNA-binding proteins for biology (pages 3734–3754)

      Yu Chen and Gabriele Varani

      Article first published online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12375

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      RNA-binding proteins play essential roles in the regulation of gene expression. Many have modular structures and combine relatively few common domains to recognize RNA sequences and/or structures. Based on their structures, the suitability of different RNA-binding domains for engineering RNA-binding specificity is discussed here. Designer RNA-binding proteins will provide valuable tools for biochemical research as well as potential therapeutic applications.

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      Engineered proteins with Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA binding factor scaffold to manipulate RNA metabolism (pages 3755–3767)

      Yang Wang, Zefeng Wang and Traci M. Tanaka Hall

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12367

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      Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA binding factor (FBF) proteins are characterized by a sequence-specific RNA-binding domain. This unique single-stranded RNA recognition module, whose sequence specificity can be reprogrammed, has been fused with functional modules to engineer protein factors with various functions. Here we summarize the advancement in developing RNA regulatory tools and opportunities for the future.

  4. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
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      MicroRNA-503 suppresses proliferation and cell-cycle progression of endometrioid endometrial cancer by negatively regulating cyclin D1 (pages 3768–3779)

      Yan-Ying Xu, Hui-Juan Wu, Hong-Da Ma, Li-Ping Xu, Yan Huo and Li-Rong Yin

      Article first published online: 27 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12365

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      The microRNA miR-503 is reduced in endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC) tissues, and cyclin D1 (CCND1) is a direct target of miR-503. miR-503 enhances malignancy of EEC cells, which could be alleviated via ectopic expression of CCND1. Abnormal suppression of miR-503 leads to an elevation of CCND1 level, which may promote the carcinogenesis and progression of EEC.

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      A novel phospholipase B from Streptomyces sp. NA684 – purification, characterization, gene cloning, extracellular production and prediction of the catalytic residues (pages 3780–3796)

      Yusaku Matsumoto, Shingo Mineta, Kazutaka Murayama and Daisuke Sugimori

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12366

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      Phospholipase B (PLB684) from Streptomyces sp. NA684 shows a new catalytic property producing lysophospholipid during hydrolysis of diacylglycerophospholipid. The catalytic functions of PLB684 are apparently different from those of fungal PLBs that accumulate no lysophospholipids. PLB684 is a new type of PLB that hydrolyzes diacylphospholipid with the order different twice reaction.

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      Identification of a sphingolipid-specific phospholipase D activity associated with the generation of phytoceramide-1-phosphate in cabbage leaves (pages 3797–3809)

      Tamotsu Tanaka, Takashi Kida, Hiroyuki Imai, Jun-ichi Morishige, Ryouhei Yamashita, Hisatsugu Matsuoka, Sachika Uozumi, Kiyoshi Satouchi, Minoru Nagano and Akira Tokumura

      Article first published online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12374

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      The structure and biosynthetic route of an unidentified lipid (lipid X) detected in cabbage lipids was determined. Lipid X was determined to be phytoceramide-1-phosphate (PC1P) having an α-hydroxy fatty acid. We found an enzyme activity that produces PC1P from glycosylinositol phosphoceramide (GIPC) in cabbage leaves. Interestingly, the enzyme activity hydrolyzes GIPC specifically, but not glycerophospholipids.

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      High-level secretion of a recombinant protein to the culture medium with a Bacillus subtilis twin-arginine translocation system in Escherichia coli (pages 3810–3821)

      Anna M. Albiniak, Cristina F. R. O. Matos, Steven D. Branston, Robert B. Freedman, Eli Keshavarz-Moore and Colin Robinson

      Article first published online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12376

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      In E. coli, the Tat pathway can transport recombinant proteins to the periplasm at high rates. Expression of a Bacillus subtilis Tat system in an E. coli tat mutant still allows efficient export, but the protein is released into the medium through a leaky outer membrane. This offers a novel means of harvesting protein products directly from the culture medium.

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      Latent myostatin has significant activity and this activity is controlled more efficiently by WFIKKN1 than by WFIKKN2 (pages 3822–3839)

      György Szláma, Mária Trexler and László Patthy

      Article first published online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12377

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      Latent myostatin has detectable activity since it dissociates at an appreciable rate and both mature and semilatent myostatin (i.e. one growth factor domain is not complexed with myostatin-prodomain) bind to myostatin receptor. Activity of semilatent myostatin is more efficiently blocked by WFIKKN1 than WFIKKN2 since affinity of WFIKKN1 for myostatin-propeptide increases its potency as an inhibitor of semilatent myostatin.

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      S100A11 is involved in the regulation of the stability of cell cycle regulator p21CIP1/WAF1 in human keratinocyte HaCaT cells (pages 3840–3853)

      Franziska Foertsch, Nicole Teichmann, Robert Kob, Julia Hentschel, Ulrike Laubscher and Christian Melle

      Article first published online: 27 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12378

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      The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21CIP1/WAF1 regulates the cell cycle. Down-regulation of the Ca2+-binding protein S100A11 deregulates PI3K/Akt pathway followed by activating GSK3 that mediates the degradation of p21 by phosphorylation at Thr57 which triggers a ubiquitin-independent proteasomal mechanism. Hence, S100A11 seems to be involved in regulation of the p21 protein stability by controlling the PI3K/Akt-GSK3 – axis.

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      Initiation of the transcriptional response to hyperosmotic shock correlates with the potential for volume recovery (pages 3854–3867)

      Cecilia Geijer, Dagmara Medrala-Klein, Elzbieta Petelenz-Kurdziel, Abraham Ericsson, Maria Smedh, Mikael Andersson, Mattias Goksör, Mariona Nadal-Ribelles, Francesc Posas, Marcus Krantz, Bodil Nordlander and Stefan Hohmann

      Article first published online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12382

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      Signal transduction components such as MAP kinases shuttle into the nucleus to activate transcription. It is not known how different amounts of nuclear MAPK over time affect the transcriptional response. We found that the initial transcriptional response correlates with the potential of cells for rapid adaptation and that the period of Hog1 nuclear residence affects the amplitude of the transcriptional response rather than the spectrum of responsive genes.

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      The nucleotide cycle of spastin correlates with its microtubule-binding properties (pages 3868–3877)

      Maorong Wen and Chunguang Wang

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12385

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      Spastin is an AAA protein with microtubule-severing activity, but the mechanism remains elusive. Here, we found that ATP-bound spastin interacts strongly and cooperatively with microtubules, and dissociates from microtubules after ATP hydrolysis. In particular, spastin in the ternary complex of microtubule-spastin-ATP is the most cooperative state during the working cycle, and is probably the force-generating state responsible for microtubule-severing.

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      Muscle phospholipid hydrolysis by Bothrops asper Asp49 and Lys49 phospholipase A2 myotoxins – distinct mechanisms of action (pages 3878–3886)

      Julián Fernández, Paola Caccin, Grielof Koster, Bruno Lomonte, José M. Gutiérrez, Cesare Montecucco and Anthony D. Postle

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12386

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      The Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity of myotoxin I and myotoxin II from the venom of Bothrops asper was measured in C2C12 myotubes and Tibialis anterior muscle. Myotoxin-I hydrolyzed phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine but not phosphatidylserine. Myotoxin-II did not cause hydrolysis of phospholipids, which excluded the activation of endogenous PLA2s as part of its mechanism of action.

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      A glycolytic metabolon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is stabilized by F-actin (pages 3887–3905)

      Daniela Araiza-Olivera, Natalia Chiquete-Felix, Mónica Rosas-Lemus, José G. Sampedro, Antonio Peña, Adela Mujica and Salvador Uribe-Carvajal

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12387

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      In Saccharomyces cerevisiae a multi-enzymatic glycolytic complex (a glycolytic metabolon) would increase efficiency. F-actin stabilized a glycolytic complex. Actin oligomers (phalloidin) but not actin monomers (cytochalasin D or latrunculin) stabilized a glycolytic metabolon with high fermentation activity and resistance to viscosity or enzyme antibody-mediated inhibition.

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      The kinetic, mechanistic and cytomorphological effects of palytoxin in human intestinal cells (Caco-2) explain its lower-than-parenteral oral toxicity (pages 3906–3919)

      Diego A. Fernández, M. Carmen Louzao, Natalia Vilariño, Begoña Espiña, María Fraga, Mercedes R. Vieytes, Albina Román, Mark Poli and Luis M. Botana

      Article first published online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12390

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      Palytoxin is a powerful marine toxin. Permeability assays indicate that the toxin is not significantly passing through the Caco-2 monolayer suggesting poor transport from human intestinal cells to blood. Palytoxin disrupts cell epithelium integrity causing a dose-dependent damage in mitochondria (M), disappearance of differentiated microvilli forming the brush border (BB), and chromatin de-condensation but tight junctions between cells seem unaffected.

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      Adiponectin protects Leydig cells against proinflammatory cytokines by suppressing the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway (pages 3920–3927)

      Ling Wu, Bufang Xu, Weimin Fan, Xiaobin Zhu, Guangyan Wang and Aijun Zhang

      Article first published online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12391

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      In the present study, we report that adiponectin protects Leydig cells against proinflammatory cytokines by suppressing the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway through promotion of AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation.

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      Lipid-binding properties of human ApoD and Lazarillo-related lipocalins: functional implications for cell differentiation (pages 3928–3943)

      Mario Ruiz, Diego Sanchez, Colin Correnti, Roland K. Strong and Maria D. Ganfornina

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12394

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      ApoD-related lipocalins share ancestral functions coexisting with specific functions. The multiplicity of lipocalin functions must relate to the lipid partner involved. We have screened binding of 15 lipids to grasshopper Laz, Drosophila NLaz and human ApoD. We find common (RA) and lipocalin-selective (2AG-ApoD, pheromone-NLaz) ligands. ApoD and NLaz successfully deliver RA to immature neurons, promoting neuritogenesis.

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      Comparative analysis of known miRNAs across platyhelminths (pages 3944–3951)

      Xiaoliang Jin, Lixia Lu, Hailong Su, Zhongzi Lou, Fang Wang, Yadong Zheng and Guo-Tong Xu

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12395

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      miRNAs are tiny regulatory RNAs that are involved in regulation of genes. Here we integrated annotated miRNAs and the genomes of platyhelminths, and found that a miR-71/2 cluster was conserved in flatworms. We also observed the transcriptional direction conversion and locus relocation of known protein-coding genes flanking miRNAs. These results imply a potential of rearrangement events occurred near the known miRNA loci.

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      A steady-state theory for processive cellulases (pages 3952–3961)

      Nicolaj Cruys-Bagger, Jens Elmerdahl, Eigil Praestgaard, Kim Borch and Peter Westh

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12397

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      Some enzymes that modify polymeric substrates use a processive mechanism, where consecutive catalytic cycles are made as the enzyme moves along the substrate molecule. We suggest a simple deterministic model to describe this behavior, and show how it can be use both in comparative analysis of different enzymes and in analyses of enzyme mechanisms.

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      microRNA-133a regulates the cell cycle and proliferation of breast cancer cells by targeting epidermal growth factor receptor through the EGFR/Akt signaling pathway (pages 3962–3974)

      Wenjing Cui, Shuai Zhang, Changliang Shan, Li Zhou and Zhemin Zhou

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12398

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      Inhibition of miR-133a during the process of breast carcinogenesis promoted over-expression of EGFR. Accordingly, aberrant up-regulation of EGFR on the cell surface activated Akt pathway thereby resulted in excessive nuclear translocation of p-Akt. Ultimately, dysregulation of cell cycle and aberrant cell proliferation occurred.

  5. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
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      Corrigendum (page 3975)

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12405

      This article corrects:

      The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) revisited

      Vol. 279, Issue 11, 2022–2035, Article first published online: 8 MAY 2012

  6. Author index

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
    1. You have free access to this content
      Author index (page 3976)

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08789.x

  7. Table of Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
    1. You have free access to this content
      Table of Contents (page 3977)

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12434

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