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The FEBS Journal

Cover image for Vol. 280 Issue 19

October 2013

Volume 280, Issue 19

Pages i–iii, 4711–4930

  1. Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
    8. THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED
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      Front Cover (page i)

      Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08796.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A schematic illustration of neuronal compartments, NAD biosynthesis in cell bodies and axons, and changes in the axonal NAD biosynthetic pathway after injury by M. Di Stefano & L. Conforti (pp. 4711–4728).

  2. Editorial Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
    8. THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED
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      Editorial Information (pages ii–iii)

      Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08796_1.x

  3. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
    8. THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED
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      Diversification of NAD biological role : the importance of location (pages 4711–4728)

      Michele Di Stefano and Laura Conforti

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12433

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      In addition to its role as a redox co-factor, NAD is emerging as a fundamental regulator of numerous biological processes including gene transcription, cell death, glucose homeostasis circadian rhythm and neurodegeneration. After summarising the main NAD metabolic pathways, here we review some evidence supporting a specialised role for NAD, its metabolic enzymes and related nucleotides in a subcellular compartment-dependent manner.

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      Harnessing the genome for characterization of G-protein coupled receptors in cancer pathogenesis (pages 4729–4738)

      Michael E. Feigin

      Version of Record online: 2 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12473

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      G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate numerous physiological processes and represent the targets for a vast array of therapeutics. Recent genome-wide analyses of human tumors have uncovered GPCRs altered in cancer. I summarize emerging studies providing evidence that GPCRs are critical regulators of tumorigenesis and explore how genomic analysis is beginning to shine a light on GPCRs as cancer therapeutic targets.

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      Viewing serine/threonine protein phosphatases through the eyes of drug designers (pages 4739–4760)

      Mengmeng Zhang, S. D. Yogesha, Joshua E. Mayfield, Gordon N. Gill and Yan Zhang

      Version of Record online: 5 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12481

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      Small chemical compounds that modulate the specific activity of protein phosphatases can be powerful tools to elucidate the biological functions of these enzymes and of great therapeutic benefit. This review summarizes the current state of investigation of the small molecules that regulate the function of serine/threonine phosphatases, the challenges presented and also strategies to overcome these obstacles.

  4. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
    8. THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED
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      Functional differentiation of small heat shock proteins in diapause-destined Artemia embryos (pages 4761–4772)

      Allison M. King, Jantina Toxopeus and Thomas H. MacRae

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12442

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      Diapause embryos of Artemia franciscana synthesize three distinct small heat shock proteins under transcriptional and translational regulation. As shown previously by RNAi, the small heat shock protein p26 influences embryo development and stress tolerance. In contrast, ArHsp21 has minimal impact on cyst stress tolerance. It was not possible to analyze ArHsp22 function because injection with dsRNA for ArHsp22 killed adults.

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      Aldehyde-forming fatty acyl-CoA reductase from cyanobacteria: expression, purification and characterization of the recombinant enzyme (pages 4773–4781)

      Fengming Lin, Debasis Das, Xiaoxia N. Lin and E. Neil G. Marsh

      Version of Record online: 23 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12443

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      Long-chain acyl-CoA reductases (ACRs) catalyze a key step in the biosynthesis of hydrocarbon waxes. Most are membrane proteins, but a cytosolic ACR was recently discovered in cyanobacteria. We have over-expressed in E. coli, purified and characterized ACR from Synechococcus elongatus. ACR reduces stearoyl-CoA to octadecanal with kcat = 0.36 ± 0.023 min−1 through a ‘ping-pong’ mechanism involving an acyl-enzyme intermediate.

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      The expanding roles of 1-methyl-tryptophan (1-MT): in addition to inhibiting kynurenine production, 1-MT activates the synthesis of melatonin in skin cells (pages 4782–4792)

      Ana C. R. Moreno, Renan O. Clara, Janine B. Coimbra, Ariane R. Júlio, Renata C. Albuquerque, Edson M. Oliveira, Silvya S. Maria-Engler and Ana Campa

      Version of Record online: 22 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12444

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      1-methyl-tryptophan (1-MT) may serve as more than just a tool to disrupt tumor immune escape (via the inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase) because it was shown to directly act on the proliferation of human melanoma cells and induce melatonin biosynthesis in fibroblasts, melanocytes and melanoma cells. We provide novel insights to understand tumor therapy regarding the control of tryptophan metabolism.

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      Modulatory ATP binding to the E2 state of maize plasma membrane H+-ATPase indicated by the kinetics of vanadate inhibition (pages 4793–4806)

      Xiaozhi Wang, Xiaoqing Qian, Beate Stumpf, Ammara Fatima, Ke Feng, Sven Schubert and Stefan Hanstein

      Version of Record online: 23 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12447

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      Plasma membrane H+-ATPase from maize roots is inhibited by vanadate according to linear mixed inhibition. Since vanadate specifically binds to the E2 state (colour scheme), this inhibition type indicates that Mg-ATP binds to the E2 state. Mg-free ATP appears to be an antagonist of vanadate inhibition. Isoforms which bind Mg-ATP before enzyme dephosphorylation could accomplish a larger pH gradient.

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      Miltefosine-unresponsive Leishmania donovani has a greater ability than miltefosine-responsive L. donovani to resist reactive oxygen species (pages 4807–4815)

      Mousumi Das, Prakash Saudagar, Shyam Sundar and Vikash K. Dubey

      Version of Record online: 23 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12449

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      We have analyzed global gene expression profiles of miltefosine-unresponsive and miltefosine-responsive Leishmania donovani in order to understand various metabolic processes involved in miltefosine drug resistance. The microarray data clearly indicated a role of oxidative metabolism in miltefosine resistance. The experimental data supports that the miltefosine unresponsive Leishmania donovani can resists formation of reactive oxygen species more efficiently.

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      Multimerization of anti-(epidermal growth factor receptor) IgG fragments induces an antitumor effect: the case for humanized 528 scFv multimers (pages 4816–4826)

      Ryutaro Asano, Yasuyo Hagiwara, Noriaki Koyama, Yosuke Masakari, Ryota Orimo, Kyoko Arai, Hiromi Ogata, Shozo Furumoto, Mitsuo Umetsu and Izumi Kumagai

      Version of Record online: 20 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12451

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      We constructed single-chain variable fragment (scFv) multimers by modifying the linker length and domain order of the humanized anti-EGFR antibody 528 (h528) and tested their ability to inhibit tumor growth. The h528 scFv multimers, expressed using a bacterial expression system, were successfully fractionated and inhibited cancer growth in a multimerization-dependent manner, whereas the h528 scFv monomer showed no inhibition.

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      N-terminal processing of membrane-targeted MnSOD and formation of multiple active superoxide dismutase dimers in the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 (pages 4827–4838)

      Prashanth S. Raghavan, Hema Rajaram and Shree K. Apte

      Version of Record online: 23 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12455

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      The membrane-targeted 30 kDa Anabaena MnSOD is cleaved by a signal peptidase, either during or after translocation across the membrane, to release a 27 kDa form in the cytosol or periplasm/thylakoid lumen respectively. Arg-C-like proteases further process it to its 24 kDa catalytic unit. The 24 kDa/27 kDa forms of MnSOD and FeSOD interact, to generate several active SOD homo/heterodimers.

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      BcsTx3 is a founder of a novel sea anemone toxin family of potassium channel blocker (pages 4839–4852)

      Diego J. B. Orts, Yehu Moran, Camila T. Cologna, Steve Peigneur, Bruno Madio, Daniela Praher, Loic Quinton, Edwin De Pauw, José E. P. W. Bicudo, Jan Tytgat and José C. de Freitas

      Version of Record online: 23 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12456

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      We have demonstrated the biochemical and pharmacological characterization of a novel type of sea anemone KV-toxins. BcsTx3 is a peptidyl toxin with a unique sequence that acts potently upon Shaker IR channels through a pore blocking mechanism. Moreover, the distribution of this newly discovered type of KV-toxins among different actiniarian species suggests an ancient origin.

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      The calcium transporter Pmc1 provides Ca2+ tolerance and influences the progression of murine cryptococcal infection (pages 4853–4864)

      Livia Kmetzsch, Charley C. Staats, Julia B. Cupertino, Fernanda L. Fonseca, Marcio L. Rodrigues, Augusto Schrank and Marilene H. Vainstein

      Version of Record online: 22 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12458

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      The three calcium transporters characterized in Cryptococcus neoformans, Cch1, Eca1, and Vcx1 are required for virulence. We reported the characterization of the putative vacuolar calcium ATPase Pmc1. Disruption of PMC1 led to impaired capsule formation under specific conditions. Pmc1 was essential for the progression of pulmonary infection in mice, emphasizing the crucial role of calcium transport for cryptococcal pathogenesis.

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      Identification and characterization of the biochemical function of Agrobacterium T-complex-recruiting protein Atu5117 (pages 4865–4875)

      Diankun Gao, Xiaowei Bian, Minliang Guo, Jing Wang and Xin Zhang

      Version of Record online: 23 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12460

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      Agrobacterium Atu5117 protein is a T-complex-recruiting protein that can recruit T-complex from cytosol to the membrane VirB/D4 T4SS transport site. Atu5117 protein contains a putative nucleotidyltransferase domain and a putative HEPN domain. Our data show that Atu5117 protein is a novel (d)NTPase. In addition, the kinetic parameters of Atu5117 (d)NTPase for eight canonical NTPs and dNTPs were characterized.

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      Evasin-4, a tick-derived chemokine-binding protein with broad selectivity can be modified for use in preclinical disease models (pages 4876–4887)

      Maud Déruaz, Pauline Bonvin, India C. Severin, Zoë Johnson, Sonja Krohn, Christine A. Power and Amanda E. I. Proudfoot

      Version of Record online: 23 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12463

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      The third chemokine-binding protein isolated from Rhipicephalus sanguineus saliva, Evasin-4, was characterized and shown to bind and inhibit most CC chemokines. To enhance the in vivo half-life of Evasin-4 and optimize its potential as a therapeutic agent, Fc fusions of Evasin-4 were created. They were shown to retain binding activity, with the C-terminal fusion showing a modest reduction in potency.

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      Cell cycle-dependent formation of Cdc45–Claspin complexes in human cells is compromized by UV-mediated DNA damage (pages 4888–4902)

      Ronan Broderick, Michael D. Rainey, Corrado Santocanale and Heinz P. Nasheuer

      Version of Record online: 27 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12465

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      Cdc45 is an essential eukaryotic replication factor. Cdc45 maximally binds Claspin, replication protein A (RPA) and DNA polymerase δ during S phase. Cdc45's C terminus mediates its interactions with Claspin. UVC treatment reduced Cdc45-Claspin interactions but UCN-01 and PIKK inhibitors do not rescue this destabilisation of Cdc45-Claspin complexes suggesting that this regulation occurs upstream of ATR activation in the intra-S-phase checkpoint.

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      Mutations of the domain forming the dimeric interface of the ArdA protein affect dimerization and antimodification activity but not antirestriction activity (pages 4903–4914)

      Gareth A. Roberts, Kai Chen, Edward K. M. Bower, Julia Madrzak, Arcadia Woods, Amy M. Barker, Laurie P. Cooper, John H. White, Garry W. Blakely, Iain Manfield and David T. F. Dryden

      Version of Record online: 2 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12467

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      ArdA antirestriction proteins are encoded by genes present in many conjugative plasmids and transposons within bacterial genomes. These dimeric proteins cause antirestriction by mimicking the DNA structure bound by Type I restriction enzymes. We have investigated the role of the domain forming the dimer interface and created a monomeric form of ArdA which maintains antirestriction activity.

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      α-Synuclein as an intrinsically disordered monomer  fact or artefact? (pages 4915–4927)

      Eduardo Coelho-Cerqueira, Phelippe Carmo-Gonçalves, Anderson Sá Pinheiro, Juliana Cortines and Cristian Follmer

      Version of Record online: 2 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12471

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      In this work, we demonstrated that the recombinant α-synuclein behaves as a disordered monomer independent of both the cell lysis method and the use of heating/acidification for protein purification. We also provided convincing evidence that the disordered monomer exists in equilibrium with a dynamic dimer, which is prone to fibrillate and thereby is an interesting target for anti-fibrillogenic agents.

  5. Author index

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
    8. THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED
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      Author index (page 4928)

      Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08795.x

  6. Table of Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
    8. THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED
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      Table of Contents (page 4929)

      Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12515

  7. THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
    8. THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED
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