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FEBS Journal

Cover image for FEBS Journal

February 2013

Volume 280, Issue 3

Pages i–iii, 775–977

  1. Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
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      Front Cover (page i)

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08764_1.x

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      Myofilament proteins in mouse cardiomyocytes by M. P. Kracklauer et al. (pp. 880–891).

  2. Editorial Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
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      Editorial Information (pages ii–iii)

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08764_2.x

  3. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
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      Histone deacetylase 6 plays a role as a distinct regulator of diverse cellular processes (pages 775–793)

      Yingxiu Li, Donghee Shin and So Hee Kwon

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12079

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      HDAC6 is the best-characterized class IIb deacetylase that regulates many important biological processes via the formation of complexes with its partner proteins. HDAC6 is important both for cytoplasmic and nuclear functions. In this review, we focused on recent studies that highlighted the importance of HDAC6-mediated biological processes, disease mechanisms and HDAC6-selective inhibitors

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      Regulation of insulin and type 1 insulin-like growth factor signaling and action by the Grb10/14 and SH2B1/B2 adaptor proteins (pages 794–816)

      Bernard Desbuquois, Nadège Carré and Anne-Françoise Burnol

      Article first published online: 2 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12080

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      Grb10/14 and SH2B1 are SH2 domain containing adapters which associate with insulin/IGF1 receptors and act as negative and positive regulators, respectively, of insulin/IGF1 signaling. Here, we review the molecular determinants of their interaction with receptors and the consequences of their overexpression and depletion in cells and mice, and discuss the potential role of altered adapter gene function in insulin resistance

  4. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
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      The mycobacterial binuclear iron monooxygenases require a specific chaperonin-like protein for functional expression in a heterologous host (pages 817–826)

      Toshiki Furuya, Mika Hayashi, Hisashi Semba and Kuniki Kino

      Article first published online: 2 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12070

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      The active expression of mycobacterial binuclear iron monooxygenases (MimABCD) in a heterologous host was dependent on the co-expression of a specific chaperonin-like protein (MimG). SDS/PAGE and western blotting analyses demonstrated that MimG played essential roles in productive folding of MimA and that the resulting soluble MimA protein led to the active expression of MimABCD

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      Genetic manipulation of myoblasts and a novel primary myosatellite cell culture system: comparing and optimizing approaches (pages 827–839)

      Melissa F. Jackson, Knut E. Hoversten, John M. Powers, Grant D. Trobridge and Buel D. Rodgers

      Article first published online: 2 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12072

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      Genetic manipulation of skeletal muscle cells in vitro is notoriously difficult. We therefore optimized methods of gene transfer using GFP with mouse C2C12 and primary rainbow trout myosatellite cells. Our protocol using lentivirus and the pgk promoter was far superior to other viral vectors, the cmv promoter and to transfection and helps overcome common technological barriers to manipulating muscle cells

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      Role of transcription factor Sp1 and RNA binding protein HuR in the downregulation of Dr+ Escherichia coli receptor protein decay accelerating factor (DAF or CD55) by nitric oxide (pages 840–854)

      Manu Banadakoppa, Daniel Liebenthal, David E. Nowak, Petri Urvil, Uma Yallampalli, Gerald M. Wilson, Aparna Kishor and Chandra Yallampalli

      Article first published online: 2 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12073

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      Nitric oxide (NO) down-regulates Dr+ E. coli binding protein DAF. In this study, we showed that binding of transcription factor Sp1 to NO-response region of DAF gene was inhibited by NO. NO promoted the decay of DAF mRNA by inhibiting the binding of mRNA stabilizing protein HuR to an AU-rich element in the 3′-untranslated region of the DAF gene

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      MicroRNA-15a promotes neuroblastoma migration by targeting reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK) and regulating matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression (pages 855–866)

      Chen Xin, Bao Buhe, Lu Hongting, Yang Chuanmin, Hao Xiwei, Zhang Hong, Han Lulu, Dong Qian and Wang Renjie

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12074

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      In our study, we demonstrated (a) miR-15a was positively correlated with NB clinical pathological stages; (b) miR–15a directly targets RECK 3′UTR and regulates its expression; (c) miRNA–15a regulated NB cell migrations through targeting RECK; (d) miR–15a regulates secreted MMP–9 expression through targeting RECK and (e) an axis of miR–15a/RECK/MMP–9 plays an important role in regulating NB migration and invasion

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      Role of GSH/GSSG redox couple in osteogenic activity and osteoclastogenic markers of human osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells (pages 867–879)

      Cecilia Romagnoli, Gemma Marcucci, Fabio Favilli, Roberto Zonefrati, Carmelo Mavilia, Gianna Galli, Annalisa Tanini, Teresa Iantomasi, Maria L. Brandi and Maria T. Vincenzini

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12075

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      A comprehensive analysis of glutathione (GSH) redox system during osteogenic differentiation was carried out in human osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells. For the first time, a clear relationship was found between the expression of specific factors involved in bone remodelling and the changes of GSH/ oxidized GSH redox couple induced during the early phases of differentiation and mineralization process

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      Discontinuous thoracic venous cardiomyocytes and heart exhibit synchronized developmental switch of troponin isoforms (pages 880–891)

      Martin P. Kracklauer, Han-Zhong Feng, Wenrui Jiang, Jenny L.-C. Lin, Jim J.-C. Lin and Jian-Ping Jin

      Article first published online: 2 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12076

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      Abundant cardiomyocytes are present in mouse and rat pulmonary and azygos veins. These cells are disconnected from the heart muscle mass but exhibit mature sarcomeres, cardiac forms of contractile protein, and developmental regulations synchronized to that in the heart. Therefore the thoracic venous cardiomyocytes residing in extra-cardiac tissue possess a physiologically differentiated state and an intrinsically preset developmental clock

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      Distinct and opposing roles for Rab27a/Mlph/MyoVa and Rab27b/Munc13-4 in mast cell secretion (pages 892–903)

      Rajesh K. Singh, Koichi Mizuno, Christina Wasmeier, Silene T. Wavre-Shapton, Chiara Recchi, Sergio D. Catz, Clare Futter, Tanya Tolmachova, Alistair N. Hume and Miguel C. Seabra

      Article first published online: 2 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12081

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      Mediator release by mast cells is critical to inflammatory and allergic responses. We used primary mast cells derived from mutant mice lacking Rab27 GTPases and their effectors to test the role of these proteins in secretion. Our results indicate that Rab27a and Rab27b play opposing roles as negative and positive regulators of exocytosis and suggest that this is achieved by coupling to different downstream effectors

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      Partial suppression of Oxa1 mutants by mitochondria-targeted signal recognition particle provides insights into the evolution of the cotranslational insertion systems (pages 904–915)

      Soledad Funes, Heike Westerburg, Fabiola Jaimes-Miranda, Michael W. Woellhaf, Jose L. Aguilar-Lopez, Linda Janßen, Nathalie Bonnefoy, Frank Kauff and Johannes M. Herrmann

      Article first published online: 2 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12082

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      In the cytosol of bacteria and eukaryotes, membrane targeting of ribosomes that synthesize membrane proteins is achieved by signal recognition particles and their cognate receptors. In contrast, in mitochondria the strong genome reduction and the loss of genes for hydrophilic proteins allowed the development of ribosome-binding sites on membrane proteins which finally made the existence of an SRP-mediated system dispensable

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      Exercise training-induced adaptations associated with increases in skeletal muscle glycogen content (pages 916–926)

      Yasuko Manabe, Katja S. C. Gollisch, Laura Holton, Young-Bum Kim, Josef Brandauer, Nobuharu L. Fujii, Michael F. Hirshman and Laurie J. Goodyear

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12085

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      We determined the effects of exercise training on the regulation of glycogen synthase and signaling molecules that regulate its function in rat skeletal muscle. Results suggest that training-induced increases in muscle glycogen content are regulated by multiple mechanisms including increases in glycogen synthase expression, muscle glucose uptake, G6P allosteric activation of glycogen synthase and PP1 activity

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      Reactive oxygen species are generated by the respiratory complex II – evidence for lack of contribution of the reverse electron flow in complex I (pages 927–938)

      Rafael Moreno-Sánchez, Luz Hernández-Esquivel, Nadia A. Rivero-Segura, Alvaro Marín-Hernández, Jiri Neuzil, Stephen J. Ralph and Sara Rodríguez-Enríquez

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12086

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      The rotenone-insensitive ROS production with succinate was greater than with NAD+-linked substrates in heart and tumor mitochondria, but not in liver mitochondria. The ROS production was enhanced by antimycin, but not by stigmatellin, suggesting that CII is the ROS-producing site. Anticancer drugs that bind to and affect CII increased succinate-driven ROS production in heart and tumor mitochondria, and SMPs

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      Direct interactions between bidensovirus BmDNV-Z proteins and midgut proteins from the virus target Bombyx mori (pages 939–949)

      Yan-Yuan Bao, Li-Bo Chen, Wen-Juan Wu, Dong Zhao, Ying Wang, Xia Qin and Chuan-Xi Zhang

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12088

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      Fifteen potential protein-protein interactions between Bombyx mori midgut and the bidensovirus BmDNV-Z were identified, using a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system. The inverse Y2H assay and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay (BiFC) confirmed some interactions between BmDNV-Z proteins and midgut proteins from the virus target B. mori

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      Functional characterization of the galactan utilization system of Geobacillus stearothermophilus (pages 950–964)

      Orly Tabachnikov and Yuval Shoham

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12089

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      The thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus contains a cluster of six genes for the utilization of β–1,4–galactan. The extracellular galactanase GanA cleaves galactan into galacto-oligosaccharides that enter the cell via a specific ATP-binding cassette sugar transport system GanEFG, where they are hydrolyzed into galactose by an intracellular β–galactosidase GanB. This system is induced by short galactosaccharides but not by galactose

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      Functional expression, purification and reconstitution of the recombinant phosphate transporter Pho89 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (pages 965–975)

      Palanivelu Sengottaiyan, Lorena Ruiz-Pavón and Bengt L. Persson

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12090

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      We have expressed the functional Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pho89 protein in the cell membrane of Pichia pastoris, solubilised and purified it. Proteoliposomes containing purified and reconstituted Pho89 protein exhibited Na+-dependent Pi transport activity driven by an artificially imposed electrochemical Na+ gradient. To our knowledge this study represents the first report on the functional reconstitution of a Pi–coupled PiT family member

  5. Author index

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
    1. You have free access to this content
      Author index (page 976)

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08763.x

  6. Table of Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Articles
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
    1. You have free access to this content
      Table of Contents (page 977)

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12139

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