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FEBS Journal

Cover image for FEBS Journal

February 2013

Volume 280, Issue 4

Pages i–iii, 979–1168

  1. Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
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      Front Cover (page i)

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08766.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A topology map (top) and homology model, lacking TMD0 and CL3 overlaid to EM density (bottom), of SUR2B by C. Fotinou et al. (pp. 1051–1063).

  2. Editorial Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
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      Editorial Information (pages ii–iii)

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08766_1.x

  3. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
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      Vacuolar protein sorting mechanisms in plants (pages 979–993)

      Li Xiang, Ed Etxeberria and Wim Van den Ende

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12092

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Plant vacuoles are unique, multifunctional organelles among eukaryotes. This review summarizes the new insights in plant vacuolar protein sorting pathways. Although these pathways greatly resemble those observed in animals, some plant-specific entities exist. A unique Golgi-independent route provides plants, as sedentary organisms, with extra flexibility to cope with ever changing environmental conditions

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  4. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
    1. You have free access to this content
      Accelerated maturation of Tk-subtilisin by a Leu[RIGHTWARDS ARROW]Promutation at the C-terminus of the propeptide, which reduces the binding of the propeptide to Tk-subtilisin (pages 994–1006)

      Ryo Uehara, Yasunori Ueda, Dong-Ju You, Yuichi Koga and Shigenori Kanaya

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12091

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Pro-Tk-subtilisin is autoprocessed at Leu69-Gly70. The mutation of Leu69 to Pro decelerates this autoprocessing but accelerates the degradation of the propeptide, and thereby accelerates the maturation of Pro-Tk-subtilisin to Tk-subtilisin. The mutation affects the conformation of the propeptide. The mutation accelerates the degradation of the propeptide by decreasing the binding ability and inhibitory potency of the propeptide

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      The six amino acid antimicrobial peptide bLFcin6 penetrates cells and delivers siRNA (pages 1007–1017)

      Bing Fang, Hui Y Guo, Ming Zhang, Lu Jiang and Fa Z Ren

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12093

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      bLFcin6, a six-amino acid peptide derived from bovine lactoferricin, was characterized as a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). bLFcin6 exhibited concentration-dependent uptake and intracellular distribution. The penetrating property of bLFcin6 was similar to that of TAT and better than other short CPPs. bLFcin6 delivered siRNA into cells by forming stable electrostatic complexes, inducing significant knockout activity at both the mRNA and protein level

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Understanding pathogenic single-nucleotide polymorphisms in multidomain proteins – studies of isolated domains are not enough (pages 1018–1027)

      Lucy G. Randles, Gwen J. S. Dawes, Beth G. Wensley, Annette Steward, Adrian A. Nickson and Jane Clarke

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12094

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      We investigate pathogenic and non-pathogenic mutations occurring at the boundaries of human spectrin repeats. We show that mutations in isolated domains do not correlate with disease; however, in a tandem model system, pathogenic mutations disrupt stabilizing interactions between domains. This causes a much larger destabilisation than expected and demonstrates the importance of studying such mutations in the correct protein context

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      X-ray crystallography and NMR studies of domain-swapped canecystatin-1 (pages 1028–1038)

      Napoleão F. Valadares, Rodrigo de Oliveira-Silva, Italo A. Cavini, Ivo de Almeida Marques, Humberto D'Muniz Pereira, Andrea Soares-Costa, Flavio Henrique-Silva, Hans R. Kalbitzer, Claudia E. Munte and Richard C. Garratt

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12095

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      The three dimensional structure of canecystatin-1, a potent inhibitor of cysteine proteases from sugar cane, has been solved in two different crystal forms. In both cases it is seen to exist as a domain-swapped dimer, the first such observation is for a cystatin of plant origin. Size exclusion chromatography and multi-dimensional NMR spectroscopy show the dimer to be the dominant species in solution

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      Mitochondrial dysfunction leads to impairment of insulin sensitivity and adiponectin secretion in adipocytes (pages 1039–1050)

      Chih-Hao Wang, Ching-Chu Wang, Hsin-Chang Huang and Yau-Huei Wei

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12096

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      We propose a molecular mechanism underlying the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in adipocytes in the pathogenesis of type 2 DM. The increase of intracellular H2O2 induced by mitochondrial dysfunction may result in insulin insensitivity through attenuation of the activation of insulin signaling, blockade of the gene expression and translocation of glucose transporter 4 (Glut4), and insufficient adiponectin secretion by adipocytes

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Tetrameric structure of SUR2B revealed by electron microscopy of oriented single particles (pages 1051–1063)

      Constantina Fotinou, Jussi Aittoniemi, Heidi de Wet, Ange Polidori, Bernard Pucci, Mark S. P. Sansom, Catherine Vénien-Bryan and Frances M. Ashcroft

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12097

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      ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are hetero-octameric complexes that link cell metabolism to membrane electrical activity. It consists of four pore-forming Kir6.2 and four regulatory sulphonylurea receptor (SUR) subunits. Single particle electron microscopy of purified SUR2B shows that SUR2B can form tetramers independently of Kir6.2. Our results provide a first glimpse of how the different domains of SUR may be arranged

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      Occurrence of glycerol uptake in Dunaliella tertiolecta under hyperosmotic stress (pages 1064–1072)

      Huixin Lin, Lei Fang, Chin Seng Low, Yvonne Chow and Yuan Kun Lee

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12100

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In response to hyperosmotic shock, the alga Dunaliella tertiolecta rapidly takes in exogenous glycerol to maintain osmoregularity. This activity is associated to Dunaliella tertiolecta Glycerol Uptake Protein 1 (DtGUP1), which belongs to the membrane-bound O-acyltransferase (MBOAT) family. A transgenic alga, with the DtGUP1 gene silenced, was unable to take in glycerol from the medium and hyperosmotic shock resulted in cell death

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      Structural and biochemical characterization of the N-terminal domain of flocculin Lg-Flo1p from Saccharomyces pastorianus reveals a unique specificity for phosphorylated mannose (pages 1073–1083)

      Lyann Sim, Magnus Groes, Kjeld Olesen and Anette Henriksen

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12102

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The crystal structure of the 25 kDa lectin domain of Lg–Flo1p flocculin from brewer's yeast was solved and its binding specificity towards oligosaccharides investigated. Lg-Flo1p has a 14-fold higher affinity for mannose-1-phosphate and glucose-1-phosphate, compared to their unphosphorylated counterparts. We propose that this higher affinity is due to charge interaction in a carbohydrate binding region unique to NewFlo type flocculins

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      Self-trimerization of ExsD limits inhibition of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa transcriptional activator ExsA in vitro (pages 1084–1094)

      Robert C. Bernhards, Anne E. Marsden, Shannon K. Esher, Timothy L. Yahr and Florian D. Schubot

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12103

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      Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes a type III secretion system (T3SS) to cause human infection. The T3SS is activated by the transcription factor ExsA which is inhibited by the antiactivator ExsD. Here we demonstrate that ExsD alone is sufficient to inhibit ExsA-dependent transcription in vitro, and a monomeric ExsD variant (ExsDM59R) reveals that the ExsD trimer is involved in thermoregulation

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      Intact rough- and smooth-form lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli separated by preparative gel electrophoresis exhibit differential biologic activity in human macrophages (pages 1095–1111)

      Elder Pupo, Buko Lindner, Helmut Brade and Andra B. Schromm

      Article first published online: 7 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12104

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bacterial lipopolysaccharides are natural mixtures of bioactive molecules which can activate different pathways of innate immunity. We have established a preparative separation of LPS into distinct LPS fractions by DOC-slab-PAGE. Biological analysis of these fractions showed that smooth- and rough-form LPS-species take different pathways to activate human macrophages. This method enables the investigation of the molecular basis of LPS immune recognition

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      Evaluation of cell-free protein synthesis for the crystallization of membrane proteins – a case study on a member of the glutamate transporter family from Staphylothermus marinus (pages 1112–1125)

      Michael Jaehme and Hartmut Michel

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12105

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We present a systematic study comparing structural and functional properties of a prokaryotic glutamate transporter homolog produced using E. coli-derived in vitro and in vivo expression systems. The protein synthesized in vitro is stable and monodisperse but misfolded. This reveals intrinsic problems of in vitro systems to produce large amounts of natively folded and homogenous membrane proteins required for crystallography

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      Unraveling the function of the two Entner–Doudoroff branches in the thermoacidophilic Crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 (pages 1126–1138)

      Theresa Kouril, Patricia Wieloch, Julia Reimann, Michaela Wagner, Melanie Zaparty, Sonja-Verena Albers, Dietmar Schomburg, Peter Ruoff and Bettina Siebers

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12106

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sulfolobus solfataricus is a thermoacidophilic archaeon that uses an unusual branched Entner-Doudoroff pathway for sugar catabolism. The physiological significance of the branches is unknown. The two kinases of the pathway were investigated using kinetic characterization and metabolomic fingerprinting. The results indicate that the semiphosphorylative branch has additional anabolic function and that the nonphosphorylative branch can substitute for it in catabolism

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      A peptide derived from the C-terminus of PB1 inhibits influenza virus replication by interfering with viral polymerase assembly (pages 1139–1149)

      Chunfeng Li, Qi Ba, Aiping Wu, Hong Zhang, Tao Deng and Taijiao Jiang

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12107

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Interfering with assembly of the Influenza virus polymerase complex could offer novel and effective anti-flu therapeutics. We identified a novel peptide PB1731-757 that can potentially inhibit influenza virus replication by interfering with assembly between PB1c and PB2n. Interestingly, in-depth analyses show that the PB1731-757 interacts with PB1c and hydrophobic residues of PB1c play an essential role in the PB1c-PB1731-757 interaction

    14. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Kinetic mechanism and inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis d-alanine:d-alanine ligase by the antibiotic d-cycloserine (pages 1150–1166)

      Gareth A. Prosser and Luiz Pedro S. de Carvalho

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12108

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mycobacterium tuberculosisD-Ala–D-Ala ligase inhibition by D-cycloserinewas studied by enzyme kinetics and ligand binding. D-cycloserine inhibits both sites with equal affinity, but cannot bind simultaneously to both. Only one site can be saturated with D-cycloserine at a time. D-cycloserine inhibition requires ATP. pH-rate studies indicate that the zwitterionic form of D-cycloserineis the best inhibitor of the mycobacterial enzyme

  5. Author index

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
    1. You have free access to this content
      Author index (page 1167)

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08765

  6. Table of Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
    1. You have free access to this content
      Table of Contents (page 1168)

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12167

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