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The FEBS Journal

Cover image for Vol. 280 Issue 7

April 2013

Volume 280, Issue 7

Pages i–iii, 1579–1732

  1. Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
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      Front Cover (page i)

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08772.x

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      Structure of E. coli rhomboid protease GIpG by K. Strisovsky (pp. 1579–1603).

  2. Editorial Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
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      Editorial Information (pages ii–iii)

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08772_1.x

  3. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
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      Structural and mechanistic principles of intramembrane proteolysis – lessons from rhomboids (pages 1579–1603)

      Kvido Strisovsky

      Version of Record online: 20 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12199

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      Intramembrane proteases regulate a wide range of biological processes, but their mechanisms are unclear. In this review I discuss the available crystal structures of prokaryotic homologs of all three classes of intramembrane proteases: the rhomboids, the intramembrane aspartyl proteases and metalloproteases, and review our current understanding of their catalytic properties.

  4. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
    1. You have free access to this content
      Heavy metal-associated isoprenylated plant protein (HIPP): characterization of a family of proteins exclusive to plants (pages 1604–1616)

      João Braga de Abreu-Neto, Andreia C. Turchetto-Zolet, Luiz Felipe Valter de Oliveira, Maria Helena Bodanese Zanettini and Marcia Margis-Pinheiro

      Version of Record online: 28 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12159

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      Metallochaperones are key proteins for the safe transport of metallic ions inside the cell. HIPPs are metallochaperones that contain a metal binding domain (HMA) and an isoprenylation motif. They are found only in vascular plants and can be separated into five clusters. HIPPs may be involved in: heavy metal homeostasis mechanisms; transcriptional responses to cold and drought, and plant-pathogen interactions

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      Intracellular accumulation of advanced glycation end products induces apoptosis via endoplasmic reticulum stress in chondrocytes (pages 1617–1629)

      Soichiro Yamabe, Jun Hirose, Yusuke Uehara, Tatsuya Okada, Nobukazu Okamoto, Kiyoshi Oka, Takuya Taniwaki and Hiroshi Mizuta

      Version of Record online: 1 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12170

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      This study investigated the effect of intracellular AGE accumulation on ER stress, apoptosis, and cartilage degradation in chondrocytes by in vivo and in vitro analysis. Our data indicates that intracellular accumulation of AGEs in chondrocytes is involved in the occurrence and progression of osteoarthritis through generation of ER stress

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      Protective action of erythropoietin on neuronal damage induced by activated microglia (pages 1630–1642)

      Shirley D. Wenker, María E. Chamorro, Daniela C. Vittori and Alcira B. Nesse

      Version of Record online: 1 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12172

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      Neuronal cells (SH-SY5Y) cultured in the presence of conditioned media from activated microglia (EOC-2) or macrophages (RAW 264.7) developed significant apoptosis, induced by high levels of NO, TNF-α, and ROS. This effect was prevented by erythropoietin (Epo) via Epo receptor activation. In addition to its antiapoptotic ability, the Epo antioxidant effect might account for an indirect influence on neuronal survival

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      The salicylate 1,2-dioxygenase as a model for a conventional gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase: crystal structures of the G106A mutant and its adducts with gentisate and salicylate (pages 1643–1652)

      Marta Ferraroni, Irene Matera, Sibylle Bürger, Sabrina Reichert, Lenz Steimer, Andrea Scozzafava, Andreas Stolz and Fabrizio Briganti

      Version of Record online: 28 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12173

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      Salicylate 1,2-dioxygenase (SDO) from Pseudaminobacter salicylatoxidans BN12, an iron(II) class (III) ring-cleaving dioxygenase, is an unusual gentisate dioxygenase which converts in addition to gentisate also various monohydroxylated substrates. The structural characterization of the G106A SDO mutant, that converts only gentisate behaving like a ‘conventional’ gentisate dioxygenase, showed that salicylate bind to the mutant in an unproductive conformation

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      The transferrin receptor-1 membrane stub undergoes intramembrane proteolysis by signal peptide peptidase-like 2b (pages 1653–1663)

      Claudia Zahn, Matthias Kaup, Regina Fluhrer and Hendrik Fuchs

      Version of Record online: 1 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12176

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      Shedding and regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) are fundamental biological processes of membrane proteins. The resulting fragments are involved in important intra- and extracellular signaling events. We demonstrate that the transferrin receptor is subject to RIP and identified the protease SPPL2b being responsible for cleavage at Gly-84. The resulting C-peptide is extracellularly released as a monomer with an internal disulfide bridge

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      Marine Rhodobacteraceae l-haloacid dehalogenase contains a novel His/Glu dyad that could activate the catalytic water (pages 1664–1680)

      Halina R. Novak, Christopher Sayer, Michail N. Isupov, Konrad Paszkiewicz, Dorothee Gotz, Andrew Mearns Spragg and Jennifer A. Littlechild

      Version of Record online: 8 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12177

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      The structures of the native, reaction intermediate and substrate-bound forms of a marine Rhodobacteraceae L-haloacid dehalogenase have been determined. The enzyme active site has significant differences from previously studied L-haloacid dehalogenases. It has a His/Glu dyad positioned for deprotonation of the catalytic water similar to that found in the haloalkane dehalogenases thereby representing a new type of L-haloacid dehalogenase

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      Effects of the KIF2C neck peptide on microtubules: lateral disintegration of microtubules and β-structure formation (pages 1681–1692)

      Youské Shimizu, Takashi Shimizu, Masayuki Nara, Mahito Kikumoto, Hiroaki Kojima and Hisayuki Morii

      Version of Record online: 7 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12182

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      KIF2C, a kinesin-13 subfamily member, depolymerizes microtubules. Synthetic peptides derived from KIF2C neck region induced microtubule bundling and lateral disintegration of microtubules into protofilaments, in the form of rings twining around intact microtubules and free straight filaments, revealed by EM observations. Results of physicochemical analyses and their interpretations will be presented

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      The silicatein propeptide acts as inhibitor/modulator of self-organization during spicule axial filament formation (pages 1693–1708)

      Werner E. G. Müller, Heinz C. Schröder, Sandra Muth, Sabine Gietzen, Michael Korzhev, Vlad A. Grebenjuk, Matthias Wiens, Ute Schloßmacher and Xiaohong Wang

      Version of Record online: 7 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12183

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      Silicateins are the crucial enzymes involved in the formation of the inorganic biosilica scaffold of the spicular skeleton in siliceous sponges. It is now described that the functions of silicatein, to act as a structural template for its biosilica product as well as to act as an enzyme, are modulated and controlled by its propeptide.

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      Upregulated H19 contributes to bladder cancer cell proliferation by regulating ID2 expression (pages 1709–1716)

      Ming Luo, Zuowei Li, Wei Wang, Yigang Zeng, Zhihong Liu and Jianxin Qiu

      Version of Record online: 6 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12185

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      H19 levels are remarkably increased in bladder cancer tissues compared with adjacent control, and forced expression of H19 promotes bladder cancer cell proliferation. Overexpression of H19 significantly increases inhibitor of DNA binding/differentiation 2 (ID2) expression level, whereas H19-knockdown decreases ID2 expression in vitro. Upregulated H19 increases bladder cancer cell proliferation by increasing ID2 expression.

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      Evolution of variety-specific regulatory schema for expression of osa-miR408 in indica rice varieties under drought stress (pages 1717–1730)

      Roseeta D. Mutum, Sonia C. Balyan, Shivani Kansal, Preeti Agarwal, Santosh Kumar, Mukesh Kumar and Saurabh Raghuvanshi

      Version of Record online: 6 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12186

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      Here, we report that drought tolerant indica rice varieties maintain high levels of evolutionarily conserved miR408 vis-à-vis sensitive varieties during drought. This differential accumulation is problably due to a similar behaviour of transcription factor OsSPL9, that regulates miR408 expression. Accordingly, target plantacyanin genes accumulate at low levels in tolerant varieties. Further, [Ca2+]cyt levels appear to regulate miR408 abundance.

  5. Author index

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
    1. You have free access to this content
      Author index (page 1731)

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08771.x

  6. Table of Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Author index
    7. Table of Contents
    1. You have free access to this content
      Table of Contents (page 1732)

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12237

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