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FEBS Journal

Cover image for Vol. 280 Issue 8

April 2013

Volume 280, Issue 8

Pages i–iii, 1733–1871

  1. Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
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      Front Cover (page i)

      Article first published online: 11 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08774.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      BmABCC2 functions as a receptor for Cry1A toxins by S. Tanaka et al. (pp. 1782–1794)

  2. Editorial Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
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      Editorial Information (pages ii–iii)

      Article first published online: 11 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08774_1.x

  3. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
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      Protein–fatty acid complexes: biochemistry, biophysics and function (pages 1733–1749)

      Christel R. Brinkmann, Steffen Thiel and Daniel E. Otzen

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12204

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      α-lactalbumin can form a cytotoxic complex with oleic acid called HAMLET. HAMLET-like cytotoxic complexes have been formed with other proteins, usually in non-native conformations and variable lipid stoichiometries. Thus the ability to form stable complexes with lipids may be a generic feature of the polypeptide chain, though the precise structural and functional details may vary from protein to protein.

  4. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
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      Structural analysis of the Rhizoctonia solani agglutinin reveals a domain-swapping dimeric assembly (pages 1750–1763)

      Vassiliki T. Skamnaki, Willy J. Peumans, Anastassia L. Kantsadi, Marc A. Cubeta, Kirsten Plas, Suman Pakala, Spyridon E. Zographos, Guy Smagghe, William C. Nierman, Els J. M. Van Damme and Demetres D. Leonidas

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12190

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      The amino acid sequence and the crystal structures of the free form and in complex with GalNAc of Rhizoctonia solani agglutinin (RSA), a 15.5 kDa lectin accumulated in the mycelium and sclerotia of the soil born plant pathogenic fungus R. solani are presented. Each monomer accommodates two carbohydrate binding sites while their assembly involves an N-terminal swap, novel to R-type lectins.

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      Transient kinetic studies reveal isomerization steps along the kinetic pathway of Thermus thermophilus 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (pages 1764–1772)

      Éva Gráczer, Corinne Lionne, Péter Závodszky, Laurent Chaloin and Mária Vas

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12191

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      The time course of NADH production during the pre-steady state of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) catalysed reaction, followed by the fast kinetic method quenched flow (QF), is possibly limited by the occurrence of substrate-caused protein conformational change(s), e.g. domain closure, as reflected by formation of a FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) signal between protein tryptophan(s) and the bound NADH.

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      A convenient luminescence assay of ferroportin internalization to study its interaction with hepcidin (pages 1773–1781)

      Ge Song, Qian Jiang, Ting Xu, Ya-Li Liu, Zeng-Guang Xu and Zhan-Yun Guo

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12192

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      Ferroportin-hepcidin system plays a key role in iron homeostasis. A convenient luminescent assay of ferroportin internalization was established by fusing a small nanoluciferase at the ferroportin C-terminus, providing a novel quantitative assay for ferroportin-hepcidin interaction studies. Through coexpression of a nanoluciferase-tagged ferroportin and an EGFP-tagged ferroportin controlled by a bi-directional promoter, hepcidin-induced ferroportin internalization could be analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively.

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      The ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily C member 2 in Bombyx mori larvae is a functional receptor for Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (pages 1782–1794)

      Shiho Tanaka, Kazuhisa Miyamoto, Hiroaki Noda, Juan Luis Jurat-Fuentes, Yasutaka Yoshizawa, Haruka Endo and Ryoichi Sato

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12200

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      To demonstrate direct evidence of functional interactions between Bombyx mori ABCC2 (BmABCC2) and Cry toxins, we expressed BmABCC2 ectopically on Sf9 cells, it served as a functional receptor, and the single amino acid insertion found in BmABCC2 from Cry1Ab-resistant larvae resulted in lack of toxin binding and susceptibility to Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac.

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      Ca2+-calmodulin interacts with DdCAD-1 and promotes DdCAD-1 transport by contractile vacuoles in Dictyostelium cells (pages 1795–1806)

      Shrivani Sriskanthadevan, Simuran K. Brar, Kumararaaj Manoharan and Chi-Hung Siu

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12203

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      The Ca2+-dependent cell-cell adhesion molecule DdCAD-1 in Dictyostelium discoideum is synthesized as soluble protein and transported to the plasma membrane via contractile vacuoles. Calmodulin binds DdCAD-1 in a Ca2+-dependent manner to form a complex which promotes the docking of DdCAD-1 onto the vacuole membrane. Calmodulin also facilitates the translocation of DdCAD-1 into the vacuole lumen.

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      Benzimidazole analogs of l-tryptophan are substrates and inhibitors of tryptophan indole lyase from Escherichia coli (pages 1807–1817)

      Austin P. Harris and Robert S. Phillips

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12205

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      β-(Benzimidazol-1-yl)-l-alanine (BZI-Ala), 2-amino-4-(benzimidazol-1-yl)butyric acid (homo-BZI-Ala), and 2-amino-5-(benzimidazol-1-yl)pentanoic acid (bishomo-BZI-Ala) were synthesized and tested as substrates and inhibitors of tryptophan indole-lyase (TIL), an enzyme found in Escherichia coli and related enterobacteria. BZI-Ala is a good substrate of TIL, homo-BZI-Ala is a potent competitive inhibitor of TIL, with Ki of 13.4 μM, but bishomo-BZI-Ala, was inactive as an inhibitor of TIL.

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      Structure of the extracellular domains of human and Xenopus Fn14: implications in the evolution of TWEAK and Fn14 interactions (pages 1818–1829)

      Maria Pellegrini, Laure Willen, Mai Perroud, Dennis Krushinskie, Kathy Strauch, Hernan Cuervo, Eric S. Day, Pascal Schneider and Timothy S. Zheng

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12206

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      TWEAK and Fn14 are members of the TNF ligand and receptor super-families. Here we report how human and Xenopus Fn14 share a common tertiary fold and binding interface to TWEAK, despite the low sequence homology. We characterize the determinants for Fn14 binding to human TWEAK and discuss how cysteine-rich domains of TNF receptor superfamily have evolved over time.

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      Communication between L–galactono–1,4–lactone dehydrogenase and cytochrome c (pages 1830–1840)

      Manuel Hervás, Qamar Bashir, Nicole G. H. Leferink, Patricia Ferreira, Blas Moreno-Beltrán, Adrie H. Westphal, Irene Dίaz–Moreno, Milagros Medina, Miguel A. de la Rosa, Marcellus Ubbink, José A. Navarro and Willem J. H. van Berkel

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12207

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      l-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GALDH) catalyzes the terminal step of vitamin C biosynthesis in plant mitochondria. GALDH communicates with its natural electron acceptor cytochrome c (Cc) via a low-affinity interaction, similar for all partner redox states, involving protein-protein dynamic motions. Evidence is also provided that Cc utilizes a conserved surface surrounding the heme edge for interaction with GALDH and other redox partners.

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      Evidence for the role of Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecG helicase in DNA repair and recombination (pages 1841–1860)

      Roshan S. Thakur, Shivakumar Basavaraju, Kumar Somyajit, Akshatha Jain, Shreelakshmi Subramanya, Kalappa Muniyappa and Ganesh Nagaraju

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12208

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      The precise function of RecG helicase is unclear. Here, we show that Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mt) recG rescues DNA damage sensitivity of E. coli ΔrecG cells (A) and purified MtRecG binds and unwinds variety of branched DNA molecules including Holliday junctions (B and C). Our data provide evidence for the role of MtRecG in maintaining genome integrity.

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      The corepressor activity of Alien is controlled by CREB-binding protein/p300 (pages 1861–1868)

      Maren Eckey, Florian Kraft, Robert Kob, Niko Escher, Mohammad Asim, Heike Fischer, Marie K. Fritsche, Christian Melle and Aria Baniahmad

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12211

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      Gene silencing by transcriptional repressors is mediated in part by corepressors. Here, we show that the corepressor Alien binds in vivo and in vitro to the coactivator CBP/p300. The interaction with these histone acetyltransferases leads to acetylation of Alien and functionally to reduced Alien-mediated transcriptional silencing. The data indicate how silencing function is modulated by post-translational modification.

  5. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
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      Corrigendum (page 1869)

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12232

      This article corrects:

      The tandemly repeated domains of a β-propeller phytase act synergistically to increase catalytic efficiency

      Vol. 278, Issue 17, 3032–3040, Article first published online: 26 JUL 2011

  6. Author index

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
    1. You have free access to this content
      Author index (page 1870)

      Article first published online: 11 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08773.x

  7. Table of Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Review Article
    5. Original Articles
    6. Corrigendum
    7. Author index
    8. Table of Contents
    1. You have free access to this content
      Table of Contents (page 1871)

      Article first published online: 11 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12259

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