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The FEBS Journal

Cover image for Vol. 280 Issue 9

May 2013

Volume 280, Issue 9

Pages i–iii, 1873–2118

  1. Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Minireview Series
    5. Minireview
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Author index
    9. Table of Contents
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      Front Cover (page i)

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08776.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Schematic representation of events inducing down-regulation of type-1cannabinoid receptor (CB1) transcription, through hypermethylation of its gene (cnr1) promoter. Possible epigenetic mechanisms evoked by endocannabinoids are also shown in the right-hand panel by C. D'Addario et al. (pp. 1905–1917).

  2. Editorial Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Minireview Series
    5. Minireview
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Author index
    9. Table of Contents
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      Editorial Information (pages ii–iii)

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08776_1.x

  3. Minireview Series

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Minireview Series
    5. Minireview
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Author index
    9. Table of Contents
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      Surfing the (endo)cannabinoids wave (page 1873)

      Alessandro Finazzi Agrò and Mauro Maccarrone

      Version of Record online: 9 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12254

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The discovery of the receptors for the most active compound of cannabis/marihuana opened the chase for the intrinsic, physiological ligands, which are collectively termed endocannabinoids. In just a few years, it has become difficult even for the followers of this field to keep up with the endocannabinoids literature, thus we thought it useful to offer the reader at least a compass to navigate such a mare magnum.

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  4. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Minireview Series
    5. Minireview
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Author index
    9. Table of Contents
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      Metabolism of endocannabinoids and related N-acylethanolamines: Canonical and alternative pathways (pages 1874–1894)

      Natsuo Ueda, Kazuhito Tsuboi and Toru Uyama

      Version of Record online: 21 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12152

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      In mammals bioactive N-acylethanolamines, including the endocannabinoid anandamide, are enzymatically biosynthesized from glycerophospholipids and degraded to fatty acids and ethanolamine. We first introduce the canonical pathways for N-acylethanolamine metabolism and then focus on its alternate pathways as well as newly discovered enzymes, such as HRASLS family proteins and N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase. The metabolism of 2-arachidonoylglycerol, another endocannabinoid, is also discussed.

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      Transport of endocannabinoids across the plasma membrane and within the cell (pages 1895–1904)

      Christopher J. Fowler

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12212

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      The mechanisms whereby the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol are accumulated in cells are reviewed. In the author's view, anandamide uptake can be adequately described as a diffusion process across the plasma membrane followed by intracellular carrier-mediated transport to effector molecules, catabolic enzymes and sequestration sites, although different cells are likely to utilise different mechanisms of endocannabinoid transport.

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      Epigenetic mechanisms and endocannabinoid signalling (pages 1905–1917)

      Claudio D'Addario, Andrea Di Francesco, Mariangela Pucci, Alessandro Finazzi Agrò and Mauro Maccarrone

      Version of Record online: 11 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12125

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      The key-role of epigenetics in multiple biological processes in health and disease has been well-documented. Among the many signalling pathways regulated by epigenetics, more attention has been focused on the endocannabinoid system searching for new clinical strategies that fall in the field of ‘epigenetic therapy’. Current knowledge of epigenetics and endocannabinoid signalling interactions under physiological and pathological conditions is here reviewed.

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      Modulating the endocannabinoid system in human health and disease – successes and failures (pages 1918–1943)

      Pál Pacher and George Kunos

      Version of Record online: 22 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12260

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      Modulating the endocannabinoid system (ECS) holds therapeutic potential in a broad range of diseases affecting humans. However, the successful translation of preclinical findings to clinical practice depends on finding the right balance between desirable and undesirable consequences of targeting this system, and on precise understanding the pathological role of the ECS in various diseases and of endocannabinoid pharmacology.

  5. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Minireview Series
    5. Minireview
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Author index
    9. Table of Contents
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      Redox regulation of protein kinases (pages 1944–1965)

      Aoife Corcoran and Thomas G. Cotter

      Version of Record online: 21 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12224

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      The recognition of ROS as mediators of cellular communications has led to their re-classification as signalling molecules. Identification of redox-sensitive kinases such as Src has prompted the emergence of a role for redox regulation of kinases. This review assesses the evidence for kinase regulation by direct oxidation, and proposes future directions for this crucial aspect of redox biology.

  6. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Minireview Series
    5. Minireview
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Author index
    9. Table of Contents
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      Reversibly acetylated lysine residues play important roles in the enzymatic activity of Escherichia coli N-hydroxyarylamine O-acetyltransferase (pages 1966–1979)

      Qunfang Zhang, Jing Gu, Peng Gong, Xude Wang, Shun Tu, Lijun Bi, Ziniu Yu, Zhiping Zhang, Zongqiang Cui, Hongping Wei, Shengce Tao and Xianen Zhang

      Version of Record online: 21 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12216

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Potential substrates of Escherichia coli CobB were screened by proteome microarray and nine proteins were identified, including N-hydroxyarylamine O-acetyltransferase. In vitro acetylation/deacetylation of NhoA was verified and two acetylated lysine residues were identified. Variant NhoA proteins carrying substitutions at the two acetylated lysine residues are involved in both the O-acetyltransferase (OAT) activity and the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity of NhoA.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Corrigendum

      Vol. 280, Issue 14, 3480, Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2013

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      Age-dependent modification of proteins: N-terminal racemization (pages 1980–1990)

      Brian Lyons, Ann H. Kwan, Joanne Jamie and Roger J. W. Truscott

      Version of Record online: 20 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12217

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      Age-dependent deterioration of long-lived proteins in humans can affect fitness and diseases of the elderly. Denaturation of old proteins results from the intrinsic instability of certain amino acids. Incubating peptides at physiological pH resulted in racemization of the N-terminal amino acid. A long-lived protein, aquaporin 0, in aged human lenses contained approximately one third N-terminal D-methionine.

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      Interplay between BDF1 and BDF2 and their roles in regulating the yeast salt stress response (pages 1991–2001)

      Jiafang Fu, Jin Hou, Liangyu Liu, Lei Chen, Mingpeng Wang, Yu Shen, Zhaojie Zhang and Xiaoming Bao

      Version of Record online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12219

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      BDF1 and BDF2 respectively encode a bromodomain-containing transcription factor. BDF2 exhibits dosage compensation in suppressing the salt sensitivity of bdf1∆, and it can restore the mitochondrial functions of bdf1∆ upon salt stress. Bdf2p interacts with Bdf1p and this interaction increases salt tolerance. In addition, Bdf1p negatively regulates BDF2 by binding its promoter at loci −387 to −48.

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      Autoprocessing mechanism of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 3C-like protease (SARS-CoV 3CLpro) from its polyproteins (pages 2002–2013)

      Tomonari Muramatsu, Yong-Tae Kim, Wataru Nishii, Takaho Terada, Mikako Shirouzu and Shigeyuki Yokoyama

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12222

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      The use of a newly developed method for measuring the activities of the mature and pro-forms of the main protease (Mpro; or 3C-like protease, 3CLpro) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) revealed important aspects of its autoprocessing mechanism, allowing a numerical simulation of the maturation pathway.

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      Signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 directly regulates human ORMDL3 expression (pages 2014–2026)

      Rongfang Qiu, Yang Yang, Hailing Zhao, Jiangxia Li, Qian Xin, Shan Shan, Yongchao Liu, Jie Dang, Xiao Yu, Yaoqin Gong and Qiji Liu

      Version of Record online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12225

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      To elucidate the mechanisms of ORMDL3 transcriptional regulation, we cloned the 1.5-kb genomic DNA fragment and identified a 68 bp region that functions as a minimal promoter. EMSA, ChIP and ChIP/Re-ChIP assays revealed that STAT6 and p300 exist in the same protein complex binding to the ORMDL3 promoter. Our study confirmed that STAT6 plays a role in regulating human ORMDL3.

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      Cancer stem-like cell properties are regulated by EGFR/AKT/β–catenin signaling and preferentially inhibited by gefitinib in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (pages 2027–2041)

      Lei Ma, Gong Zhang, Xiao-Bo Miao, Xu-Bin Deng, Yue Wu, Ying Liu, Zhi-Ru Jin, Xi-Qing Li, Qiu-Zhen Liu, Du-Xin Sun, Joseph R. Testa, Kai-Tai Yao and Guang-Hui Xiao

      Version of Record online: 8 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12226

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      EGFR pathway is involved in regulating cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Effects of EGFR on CSCs are mediated by AKT, and β-catenin is responsible for governing CSC properties in response to EGFR/AKT activation. CSCs are enriched by cisplatin and decreased by gefitinib in NPC xenograft models. Expression of EGFR correlates with expression of β-catenin and Nanog in primary tumors.

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      Sodium butyrate inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-induced proliferation and migration in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells through Akt inhibition (pages 2042–2055)

      Silvia Cantoni, Margherita Galletti, Filippo Zambelli, Sabrina Valente, Francesca Ponti, Riccardo Tassinari, Gianandrea Pasquinelli, Nazzareno Galiè and Carlo Ventura

      Version of Record online: 28 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12227

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Unbalance of proliferation and migration in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) is essential in the onset and progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Compared to its antineoplastic/antiproliferative effects, little is known on the sodium butyrate (BU) action on vascular cell dynamics. Here, we show that BU counteracted PDGF-induced PASMCs proliferation and migration. BU strongly inhibited PDGF-induced Akt-phosphorylation through phosphatase activation.

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      Burkholderia oklahomensis agglutinin is a canonical two-domain OAA-family lectin: structures, carbohydrate binding and anti-HIV activity (pages 2056–2067)

      Matthew J. Whitley, William Furey, Sireesha Kollipara and Angela M. Gronenborn

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12229

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      Burkholderia oklahomensis EO147 agglutinin (BOA) is a two-domain member of the OAA family of anti-HIV lectins. In this work, we present the x-ray crystal structures of BOA in the ligand-free state and bound to four molecules of 3α,6α-mannopentaose. Additionally, we characterize sugar binding via NMR spectroscopy and assay BOA's ability to block HIV entry into target cells.

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      NMR mapping of RANTES surfaces interacting with CCR5 using linked extracellular domains (pages 2068–2084)

      Einat Schnur, Naama Kessler, Yuri Zherdev, Eran Noah, Tali Scherf, Fa-Xiang Ding, Svetlana Rabinovich, Boris Arshava, Victoria Kurbatska, Ainars Leonciks, Alexander Tsimanis, Osnat Rosen, Fred Naider and Jacob Anglister

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12230

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      CCR5 extracellular domains were linked by either biosynthesis in Escherichia coli or by chemical synthesis to overcome the low affinity of ECL peptides to the receptors. Using these chimeras, Nt-CCR5 and ECL2 were found to be the major contributors to CCR5 binding to RANTES, creating a nearly closed ring around this protein by interacting with opposing faces of the chemokine.

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      How a host cell signalling molecule modifies carbon metabolism in symbionts of the coral Plesiastrea versipora (pages 2085–2096)

      Adrienne Grant, Julie People, Marc Rémond, Sarah Frankland and Rosalind Hinde

      Version of Record online: 8 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12233

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      All animals and plants use cell signals to regulate nutrition, reproduction and growth. A cell signal produced by the long-lived coral Plesiastrea versipora, regulates the metabolism of algal carbon produced during photosynthesis, reducing starch and triacylglycerol synthesis. This cell signal is produced by animal cells that lack algae, suggesting it may have a role in both animal and plant biochemistry.

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      Assembly in vitro of Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 encapsulin and peroxidase DypB to form a nanocompartment (pages 2097–2104)

      Rahman Rahmanpour and Timothy D. H. Bugg

      Version of Record online: 8 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12234

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 peroxidase DypB, which has lignin peroxidase activity, assembles in vitro with a 29 kDa encapsulin protein to form a 60-subunit nanocompartment. The assembled complex shows enhanced lignin degradation activity per mg DypB present, compared with native DypB, using a nitrated lignin UV-visible assay method.

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      The proto-oncogene ERG is a target of microRNA miR-145 in prostate cancer (pages 2105–2116)

      Martin Hart, Sven Wach, Elke Nolte, Jaroslaw Szczyrba, Roopika Menon, Helge Taubert, Arndt Hartmann, Robert Stoehr, Wolf Wieland, Friedrich A. Grässer and Bernd Wullich

      Version of Record online: 8 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12236

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      One hallmark of prostate cancer is the overexpression of the ERG proto-oncogene. The 3’ untranslated region of the ERG mRNA is a target of miR-145, which is down-regulated in tumor samples. Ectopic expression of miR-145 causes a reduced ERG protein expression. This observation indicates that down-regulation of miR-145 might contribute to the increased expression ERG in prostate cancer.

  7. Author index

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Minireview Series
    5. Minireview
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Author index
    9. Table of Contents
    1. You have free access to this content
      Author index (page 2117)

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-4658.2013.08775.x

  8. Table of Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Front Cover
    3. Editorial Information
    4. Minireview Series
    5. Minireview
    6. Review Article
    7. Original Articles
    8. Author index
    9. Table of Contents
    1. You have free access to this content
      Table of Contents (page 2118)

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/febs.12284

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