Pathogens and Disease

Cover image for Vol. 68 Issue 1

June 2013

Volume 68, Issue 1

Pages i–ii, 1–38

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Virulence Factors
    4. Microbial Communities in Infection and Disease
    5. Host Responses to Infection
    6. Translational Research
    1. Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-695X.2013.01018.x

  2. Virulence Factors

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Virulence Factors
    4. Microbial Communities in Infection and Disease
    5. Host Responses to Infection
    6. Translational Research
    1. Research Article

      The long polar fimbriae operon and its flanking regions in bovine Escherichia coli O157:H43 and STEC O136:H12 strains (pages 1–7)

      Domonkos Sváb, Lucia Galli, Balázs Horváth, Gergely Maróti, Ulrich Dobrindt, Alfredo G. Torres, Marta Rivas and István Tóth

      Version of Record online: 11 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12038

      This paper highlights the diversity of the Escherichia coli species and one of the virulence factors of these pathogens of animals and man.

  3. Microbial Communities in Infection and Disease

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Virulence Factors
    4. Microbial Communities in Infection and Disease
    5. Host Responses to Infection
    6. Translational Research
    1. Short Communication

      Resistance to the quorum-quenching compounds brominated furanone C-30 and 5-fluorouracil in Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates (pages 8–11)

      Rodolfo García-Contreras, Mariano Martínez-Vázquez, Norma Velázquez Guadarrama, Alejandra Guadalupe Villegas Pañeda, Takahiro Hashimoto, Toshinari Maeda, Héctor Quezada and Thomas K. Wood

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12039

      In this work the effect of 2 quorum sensing inhibitors on different clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was examined and some of the isolates were found to be resistant the inhibitors. The results are potentially useful for the clinic and for treatment of P. aeruginosa infections.

  4. Host Responses to Infection

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Virulence Factors
    4. Microbial Communities in Infection and Disease
    5. Host Responses to Infection
    6. Translational Research
    1. Research Articles

      Serum antibody response to group II chaperonin from Methanobrevibacter oralis and human chaperonin CCT (pages 12–19)

      Kimito Hirai, Hiroshi Maeda, Kazuhiro Omori, Tadashi Yamamoto, Susumu Kokeguchi and Shogo Takashiba

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12041

      Methanobrevibacter oralis is a suspected periodontal pathogen and in this study the serum responses to human CCT and the M.oralis group II chaperonin were studied in patients with periodontitis and autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, both diseased groups showed elevated responses to one or more CCT subunits, suggesting the potential importance of cross-reactivity in autoimmune diseases.

    2. Irradiated wild-type and Spa mutant Staphylococcus aureus induce anti-S. aureus immune responses in mice which do not protect against subsequent intravenous challenge (pages 20–26)

      Pauline M. van Diemen, Yuko Yamaguchi, Gavin K. Paterson, Christine S. Rollier, Adrian V.S. Hill and David H. Wyllie

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12042

      This is a clear and concise account of a failed Staphylococcus aureus vaccine trial in mice, which contributes to the knowledge in the field. The readers will benefit from a discussion on the mouse strains used in the different vaccine trails, since susceptibility to S. aureus infection is mouse strain-dependent.

  5. Translational Research

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Virulence Factors
    4. Microbial Communities in Infection and Disease
    5. Host Responses to Infection
    6. Translational Research
    1. Short Communication

      Codon optimisation to improve expression of a Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis-specific membrane-associated antigen by Lactobacillus salivarius (pages 27–38)

      Christopher Johnston, Pierre E. Douarre, Tewfik Soulimane, Daniel Pletzer, Helge Weingart, John MacSharry, Aidan Coffey, Roy D. Sleator and Jim O'Mahony

      Version of Record online: 18 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12040

      The manuscript clearly demonstrates that codon optimization improves expression and hence provides a simple but effective way to increase expression levels of the target antigen in a host organism. The underlying approach of expressing Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP) genes in Lactobacillus strains is also an interesting idea which has the potential to help immunize cattle against Johne's disease. As this was the first direct assessment of the impact of MAP codon bias on expression in a heterologous host, this study is of importance to the field.

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