Pathogens and Disease

Cover image for Vol. 68 Issue 3

August 2013

Volume 68, Issue 3

Pages 65–124

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Cellular Pathogenesis
    4. Microbial Communities in Infection and Disease
    5. Host responses to Infection
    6. Translational Research
    1. Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-695X.2013.01020.x

  2. Cellular Pathogenesis

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Cellular Pathogenesis
    4. Microbial Communities in Infection and Disease
    5. Host responses to Infection
    6. Translational Research
    1. Research Article

      Differences in recognition of wild-type and lipoprotein-deficient strains of oral Streptococci in vitro and in vivo (pages 65–77)

      Taku Segawa, Ayumi Saeki, Akira Hasebe, Takafumi Arimoto, Hideo Kataoka, Atsuro Yokoyama, Masamitsu Kawanami and Ken-ichiro Shibata

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12049

      Oral streptococci, major members of the oral microflora, can cause bacteremia and infective endocarditis; endocarditis is lethal if not aggressively treated. By creating lipoprotein-deficient strains of streptococci, this paper establishes that lipoproteins are crucial in activation of the key instigators of innate immunity – TLR2 and NOD2 – and initiation of protective immunity.

  3. Microbial Communities in Infection and Disease

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Cellular Pathogenesis
    4. Microbial Communities in Infection and Disease
    5. Host responses to Infection
    6. Translational Research
    1. Short Communication

      Detection of intracellular bacterial communities in a child with Escherichia coli recurrent urinary tract infections (pages 78–81)

      Luciana Robino, Paola Scavone, Lucia Araujo, Gabriela Algorta, Pablo Zunino and Rafael Vignoli

      Version of Record online: 26 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12047

      This work verifies that E. coli can be intracellular in cases of severe recurrent urinary tract infections.

  4. Host responses to Infection

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Cellular Pathogenesis
    4. Microbial Communities in Infection and Disease
    5. Host responses to Infection
    6. Translational Research
    1. Research Articles

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Salivary IgA response to probiotic bacteria and mutans streptococci after the use of chewing gum containing Lactobacillus reuteri (pages 82–87)

      Dan Ericson, Kristina Hamberg, Gunilla Bratthall, Gabriela Sinkiewicz-Enggren and Lennart Ljunggren

      Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12048

      In this small-scale random controlled trial, the authors have tested the effect of the probiotic bacterium, Lactobacillus reuteri, instilled into chewing gum versus a placebo. They found that the probiotic intervention did indeed affect salivary IgA concentration thus indicating an effect on local immunity, and providing yet another effective approach to the delivery of probiotics.

    2. Chlamydial infection of the gastrointestinal tract: a reservoir for persistent infection (pages 88–95)

      Laxmi Yeruva, Nicole Spencer, Anne K. Bowlin, Yin Wang and Roger G. Rank

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12052

      In this paradigm shifting study, the authors confirm that chlamydiae can efficiently infect the gastrointestinal tract (of mice in this case but potentially all hosts, including humans) and remain there as chronic infections for significant lengths of time. While the host might mount an initial immune response, this does not eliminate the infection. This “silent” GI tract infection by Chlamydia could result in subsequent reinfections, not only of the gastrointestinal tract but also the genital tract, altering the way we view host immune response to this pathogen.

    3. The role of Serpine-1 and Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase type-1 in early host responses to Staphylococcus aureus intracutaneous infection of mice (pages 96–104)

      Jakob Harslund, Dorte Frees, Páll S. Leifsson, Hanne Offenberg, Maria U. Rømer, Nils Brünner and John E. Olsen

      Version of Record online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12055

      Authors used knock-out mice in two important protease inhibitors to investigate their role in host responses in a mouse model of skin infection. Surprisingly they observed that despite previous reports of an important role in the control of other (Gram negative) bacteria, lack of these genes did not influence the ability of the mice to control S. aureus infection.

    4. Quantitative immunophenotypic analysis of antigen-presenting cells involved in ectromelia virus antigen presentation in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice (pages 105–115)

      Lidia Szulc-Dąbrowska, Małgorzata Gieryńska, Anna Boratyńska-Jasińska, Lech Martyniszyn, Anna Winnicka and Marek G. Niemiałtowski

      Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12054

      This paper analyzes antigen presentation in ectromelia infected susceptible and resistent mice, and explains the differences in T cell polarization between the strains. Presence of infected CD11c+, CD11b+ and CD19+ cells in draining lymph nodes and spleens of infected mice is analyzed over time and interactions between pAPC and ‘effector’ cells are analyzed.

  5. Translational Research

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Cellular Pathogenesis
    4. Microbial Communities in Infection and Disease
    5. Host responses to Infection
    6. Translational Research
    1. Research Article

      Hypericum hircinum L. components as new single-molecule inhibitors of both HIV-1 reverse transcriptase-associated DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H activities (pages 116–124)

      Francesca Esposito, Cinzia Sanna, Claudia Del Vecchio, Valeria Cannas, Alessandro Venditti, Angela Corona, Armandodoriano Bianco, Anna M. Serrilli, Laura Guarcini, Cristina Parolin, Mauro Ballero and Enzo Tramontano

      Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12051

      Combination antiretroviral therapy has forever changed the outcome of AIDS, transforming it from an untreatable, fatal syndrome into a manageable chronic condition. However, the search for new therapeutic targets is always on, because of the issue of mutation in the virus determining resistance to all drugs in use. Esposito et al. describe the activities of compounds that they tested against RNase H, a viral enzyme that has not been fully exploited as a target for antiretrovirals. Their results will be relevant to the development of new drugs to treat HIV infection.

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