Pathogens and Disease

Cover image for Vol. 67 Issue 3

April 2013

Volume 67, Issue 3

Pages i–ii, 159–224

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Molecular Pathogenesis
    4. Microbial Communities in Infection and Disease
    5. Host Responses to Infection and Disease
    1. Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-695X.2012.01017.x

  2. Molecular Pathogenesis

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Molecular Pathogenesis
    4. Microbial Communities in Infection and Disease
    5. Host Responses to Infection and Disease
    1. MiniReview

      Pseudomonas aeruginosa: new insights into pathogenesis and host defenses (pages 159–173)

      Shaan L. Gellatly and Robert E.W. Hancock

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12033

      This review about Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute and chronic virulence is timely and extremely well presented. It presents both the response of the host and the virulence factors produced by the bacterium.

    2. Research Article

      Contribution of fibronectin-binding protein to pathogenesis of Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus (pages 174–183)

      Li Yi, Yang Wang, Zhe Ma, Hui Zhang, Yue Li, Jun-xi Zheng, Yong-chun Yang, Cheng-ping Lu and Hong-jie Fan

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12029

      This paper reports the study of a fibronectin-binding protein to the pathogenesis of Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidermicus. The paper is well written and informative.

  3. Microbial Communities in Infection and Disease

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Molecular Pathogenesis
    4. Microbial Communities in Infection and Disease
    5. Host Responses to Infection and Disease
    1. Research Articles

      Protective effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG against human rotavirus-induced diarrhoea in a neonatal mouse model (pages 184–191)

      Zhen Zhang, Yun Xiang, Na Li, Baoxiang Wang, Hongwu Ai, Xiaomei Wang, Laiqiang Huang and Yi Zheng

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12030

      The manuscript deals with an important topic in mucosal immunology - the mechanism of activity by which probiotics protect against rotavirus (RV)-induced diarrhea. The data shows that in an animal model, administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) is associated with higher levels of soluble IgA, and modulation of production of cytokines IFN-[gamma] and TNF-α is observed. These findings may contribute to improve prevention and treatment of RV-induced diarrhea in humans.

    2. Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus epidermidis on peritoneal dialysis catheters and the effects of extracellular products from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (pages 192–198)

      Maria Pihl, Anna Arvidsson, Marie Skepö, Martin Nilsson, Michael Givskov, Tim Tolker-Nielsen, Gunnel Svensäter and Julia R. Davies

      Article first published online: 3 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12035

      This paper increases our understanding of the mechanisms by which bacteria colonise non-biological surfaces in the presence of host proteins and in addition shows that there are bacterial molecules with the potential to be used as anti-adhesive or anti-bacterial molecules in biofilm-related infections.

  4. Host Responses to Infection and Disease

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Molecular Pathogenesis
    4. Microbial Communities in Infection and Disease
    5. Host Responses to Infection and Disease
    1. Research Articles

      Lipid IVa incompletely activates MyD88-independent Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in mouse macrophage cell lines (pages 199–205)

      Norihiko Ogura, Masashi Muroi, Yuka Sugiura and Ken-ichi Tanamoto

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12031

      The manuscript contains interesting novel observation that lipid IVa preferentially stimulates MyD88-associated NFkB signaling in mouse macrophage cell-lines. This information will be useful to those who investigate mechanisms of differential signaling adapter usage by the TLR4/MD2 LPS receptor.

    2. IgG subclass profiles in normal human sera of antibodies specific to five kinds of microbial antigens (pages 206–213)

      Astrid Hjelholt, Gunna Christiansen, Uffe S. Sørensen and Svend Birkelund

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12034

      The authors show that both the nature of the antigen as well as the site of colonization affects the type of antibody response mounted to microorganisms. Viruses and intra - and extracellular bacteria entering the body via the respiratory tract elicited mainly an IgG1 response, whereas the mucosal STD pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis elicited mainly an IgG3 response. This confirms the complex interactions between the innate and adaptive immune responses.

    3. Retnla down-regulation and IL-13-rich environment correlate with inflammation severity in experimental actinomycetoma by Nocardia brasiliensis (pages 214–220)

      Irene Meester, Adrián G. Rosas-Taraco and Mario C. Salinas-Carmona

      Article first published online: 3 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12036

      Nocardia brasiliensis is responsible for an opportunistic skin infection that can be severe and chronic called actinomycetoma resulting in severe inflammation and tissue deformation. The basis of the pathology is unknown. N. brasiliensis does not contain a toxin but products that induce an aberrant immune response. This paper provides evidence that N. brasiliensis in a macrophage model induces both a pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory environment resulting in macrophage polarization that may be the basis of its pathology.

    4. Short Communication

      OT-1 mice display minimal upper genital tract pathology following primary intravaginal Chlamydia muridarum infection (pages 221–224)

      Srikanth Manam, Bruce J. Nicholson and Ashlesh K. Murthy

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12032

      In this straightforward study, Murthy et al. show that mice whose CD8 T cells that are ‘locked-in’ for the recognition of one antigen (OVA), do not show any deficiencies in the ability to clear chlamydia from infected oviducts. However, unlike wild type mice, these OVA-specific mice do not develop pathology, suggesting that Chlamydia-specific CD8 T cells contribute significantly to immune pathology despite a lack of a role for in vivo clearance of the pathogen.

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