Pathogens and Disease

Cover image for Vol. 70 Issue 3

Special Issue: Biofilms III

April 2014

Volume 70, Issue 3

Pages I–II, 203–448

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. MiniReviews
    5. Research Articles
    6. Short Communications
    1. Issue Information (pages I–II)

      Version of Record online: 10 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12089

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. MiniReviews
    5. Research Articles
    6. Short Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Microbial biofilms – the coming of age of a research field (pages 203–204)

      Tom Coenye, Patrick Van Dijck, Thomas Bjarnsholt and Ake Forsberg

      Version of Record online: 10 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12169

  3. MiniReviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. MiniReviews
    5. Research Articles
    6. Short Communications
    1. A personal history of research on microbial biofilms and biofilm infections (pages 205–211)

      Niels Høiby

      Version of Record online: 10 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12165

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      The words ‘biofilms’ and biofilm infections has only been used in medicine for 30 years, but the phenomenon was detected already by Leeuwenhoek and Pasteur and by environmental microbiologists in the 1920s and 30s.

    2. Biophysics of biofilm infection (pages 212–218)

      Philip S. Stewart

      Version of Record online: 16 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12118

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      Infections associated with microorganisms in biofilms persist in part due to the material properties and mechanical tenacity of the biofilm.

    3. Microbial cell surface proteins and secreted metabolites involved in multispecies biofilms (pages 219–230)

      Liesbeth Demuyser, Mary Ann Jabra-Rizk and Patrick Van Dijck

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12123

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      In this review, we describe the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the interaction between different species in a biofilm and some advanced methods to investigate this.

    4. Anti-biofilm agents: recent breakthrough against multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus (pages 231–239)

      Pooi Y. Chung and Yien S. Toh

      Version of Record online: 24 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12141

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      New approaches that target each important phases of biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus have been developed, and with clinical validation, these approaches will eventually lead to anti-biofilm therapies that could replace and complement current antibiotic treatment.

    5. Toxin–Antitoxin systems: their role in persistence, biofilm formation, and pathogenicity (pages 240–249)

      Yurong Wen, Ester Behiels and Bart Devreese

      Version of Record online: 24 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12145

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      The authors review how toxin/antitoxin systems are involved in regulation of bacterial metabolic activity and how they control the lifestyle of bacteria in relationship to infectious diseases.

    6. Minimum information about a biofilm experiment (MIABiE): standards for reporting experiments and data on sessile microbial communities living at interfaces (pages 250–256)

      Anália Lourenço, Tom Coenye, Darla M. Goeres, Gianfranco Donelli, Andreia S. Azevedo, Howard Ceri, Filipa L. Coelho, Hans-Curt Flemming, Talis Juhna, Susana P. Lopes, Rosário Oliveira, Antonio Oliver, Mark E. Shirtliff, Ana M. Sousa, Paul Stoodley, Maria Olivia Pereira and Nuno F. Azevedo

      Version of Record online: 24 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12146

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      MIABiE presents guidelines about the data to be recorded and published in order for the procedure and results of the biofilm experiments to be easily and unequivocally interpreted and reproduced.

    7. Treatment of microbial biofilms in the post-antibiotic era: prophylactic and therapeutic use of antimicrobial peptides and their design by bioinformatics tools (pages 257–270)

      Mariagrazia Di Luca, Giuseppe Maccari and Riccardo Nifosì

      Version of Record online: 7 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12151

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      Recent literature reports antimicrobial peptides as alternative to conventional drugs against biofilm-related infections. Development of biofilm-active molecules may benefit from computational approaches including AMPs design methods and biofilm modeling.

  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. MiniReviews
    5. Research Articles
    6. Short Communications
    1. Bacteria that inhibit quorum sensing decrease biofilm formation and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (pages 271–279)

      Steven E.A. Christiaen, Nele Matthijs, Xiao-Hua Zhang, Hans J. Nelis, Peter Bossier and Tom Coenye

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12124

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      Bacteria interfering with quorum sensing of other bacteria influence biofilm formation and virulence and may be a source of novel anti-infectious agents.

    2. Residence of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Moraxella catarrhalis within polymicrobial biofilm promotes antibiotic resistance and bacterial persistence in vivo (pages 280–288)

      Antonia C. Perez, Bing Pang, Lauren B. King, Li Tan, Kyle A. Murrah, Jennifer L. Reimche, John T. Wren, Stephen H. Richardson, Uma Ghandi and W. Edward Swords

      Version of Record online: 3 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12129

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      Polymicrobial biofilms promote bacterial resistance to antibiotics and host immune clearance.

    3. Efficacy of dental unit disinfectants against Candida spp. and Hartmannella vermiformis (pages 289–296)

      Vanessa Barbot, Damien Costa, Marie Deborde and Christine Imbert

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12127

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      Candida and Hartmannella growing in mixed biofilms would be less susceptible than single-species biofilms and than mixed planktonic cultivations to chemical treatments used for disinfection of dental unit waterlines.

    4. Thiophenone and furanone in control of Escherichia coli O103:H2 virulence (pages 297–306)

      Ingun L. Witsø, Tore Benneche, Lene K. Vestby, Live L. Nesse, Jessica Lönn-Stensrud and Anne A. Scheie

      Version of Record online: 3 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12128

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      This is the first study to explore the effect of thiophenone on Escherichia coli biofilm formation and virulence factors.

    5. The complex interplay of iron, biofilm formation, and mucoidy affecting antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (pages 307–320)

      Amanda G. Oglesby-Sherrouse, Louise Djapgne, Angela T. Nguyen, Adriana I. Vasil and Michael L. Vasil

      Version of Record online: 10 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12132

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      Iron supplementation increases the ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to resist certain antibiotics.

    6. Protease production by Staphylococcus epidermidis and its effect on Staphylococcus aureus biofilms (pages 321–331)

      Ilse Vandecandelaere, Pieter Depuydt, Hans J. Nelis and Tom Coenye

      Version of Record online: 5 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12133

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      Staphylococcus epidermidis strains secrete a mixture of proteases, and these proteases have an effect on biofilms formed by the nosocomial pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus.

    7. Biofilm models for the food industry: hot spots for plasmid transfer? (pages 332–338)

      Eva Van Meervenne, Rosemarie De Weirdt, Els Van Coillie, Frank Devlieghere, Lieve Herman and Nico Boon

      Version of Record online: 3 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12134

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      A multiresistance plasmid could easily be transferred in dual-species biofilms, which represents models for the food industry.

    8. Bacterial biofilm formation and treatment in soft tissue fillers (pages 339–346)

      Morten Alhede, Özge Er, Steffen Eickhardt, Kasper Kragh, Maria Alhede, Louise Dahl Christensen, Steen Seier Poulsen, Michael Givskov, Lise H. Christensen, Niels Høiby, Michael Tvede and Thomas Bjarnsholt

      Version of Record online: 18 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12139

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      Effect of prophylactic and late initiated treatment of infected tissue filler gels in mice.

    9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis pellicles express unique proteins recognized by the host humoral response (pages 347–358)

      Patrick W. Kerns, David F. Ackhart, Randall J. Basaraba, Jeff G. Leid and Mark E. Shirtliff

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12142

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      An investigation of host immune response to tuberculosis static culture proteins examining membrane proteins that stimulate an antibody response in guinea pigs infected with tuberculosis.

    10. Expression of antimicrobial drug tolerance by attached communities of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (pages 359–369)

      David F. Ackart, Laurel Hascall-Dove, Silvia M. Caceres, Natalie M. Kirk, Brendan K. Podell, Christian Melander, Ian M. Orme, Jeff G. Leid, Jerry A. Nick and Randall J. Basaraba

      Version of Record online: 24 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12144

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      Mycobacterium tuberculosis expresses in vitro drug tolerance by forming attached microbial communities.

    11. Reversal of Mycobacterium tuberculosis phenotypic drug resistance by 2-aminoimidazole-based small molecules (pages 370–378)

      David F. Ackart, Erick A. Lindsey, Brendan K. Podell, Roberta J. Melander, Randall J. Basaraba and Christian Melander

      Version of Record online: 24 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12143

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      A class of small molecular weight compounds known to inhibit bacterial biofilms was shown to reverse the in vitro expression of antimicrobial resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    12. Increased production of gliotoxin is related to the formation of biofilm by Aspergillus fumigatus: an immunological approach (pages 379–389)

      Francesca Bugli, Francesco Paroni Sterbini, Margherita Cacaci, Cecilia Martini, Stefano Lancellotti, Egidio Stigliano, Riccardo Torelli, Vincenzo Arena, Morena Caira, Patrizia Posteraro, Maurizio Sanguinetti and Brunella Posteraro

      Version of Record online: 1 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12152

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      Correlation between Aspergillus fumigatus biofilm formation and increased gliotoxin production makes biofilm-related infections particularly difficult to settle and suggests the use of gliotoxin as a diagnostic marker for these infections.

    13. Multiple effects of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 on growth, biofilm formation, and inflammation cytokines profile of Clostridium perfringens type A strain CP4 (pages 390–400)

      Yanlong Jiang, Qingke Kong, Kenneth L. Roland, Amanda Wolf and Roy Curtiss III

      Version of Record online: 11 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12153

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      New soldier: Presence of E. coli Nissle strain dramatically represses C. perfringens growth, toxins production, biofilm formation, as well as the release of inflammatory cytokines.

    14. Antifouling polyurethanes to fight device-related staphylococcal infections: synthesis, characterization, and antibiofilm efficacy (pages 401–407)

      Iolanda Francolini, Gianfranco Donelli, Claudia Vuotto, Fabrizio Alessandro Baroncini, Paul Stoodley, Vincenzo Taresco, Andrea Martinelli, Lucio D'Ilario and Antonella Piozzi

      Version of Record online: 17 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12155

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      The synthesized polyurethane exhibits an intrinsic ability to counteract biofilm formation without any specific surface functionalization or impregnation with antimicrobial agents.

    15. Importance of biofilm formation and dipeptidyl peptidase IV for the pathogenicity of clinical Porphyromonas gingivalis isolates (pages 408–413)

      Sofie Clais, Gaëlle Boulet, Monique Kerstens, Tessa Horemans, Wim Teughels, Marc Quirynen, Ellen Lanckacker, Ingrid De Meester, Anne-Marie Lambeir, Peter Delputte, Louis Maes and Paul Cos

      Version of Record online: 11 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12156

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      Evaluation of clinical Porphyromonas gingivalis isolates suggests that biofilm formation and DPPIV activity contribute to the pathogenic potential of P. gingivalis.

    16. Temporal expression of agrB, cidA, and alsS in the early development of Staphylococcus aureus UAMS-1 biofilm formation and the structural role of extracellular DNA and carbohydrates (pages 414–422)

      Rossella Grande, Laura Nistico, Karthik Sambanthamoorthy, Mark Longwell, Antonio Iannitelli, Luigina Cellini, Antonio Di Stefano, Luanne Hall Stoodley and Paul Stoodley

      Version of Record online: 11 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12158

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      Although gene expression suggested the importance of eDNA in early biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus UAMS-1, the lack of dispersal with DNase shows it is not necessarily essential for stability.

    17. High-content phenotypic screenings to identify inhibitors of Candida albicans biofilm formation and filamentation (pages 423–431)

      Christopher G. Pierce, Stephen. P. Saville and Jose L. Lopez-Ribot

      Version of Record online: 11 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12161

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      We have performed high-content screenings to identify inhibitors of Candida albicans biofilm formation and filamentation, two complex biological processes that are also intimately linked to the pathogenesis of candidiasis.

    18. Promising results of cranberry in the prevention of oral Candida biofilms (pages 432–439)

      Marion Girardot, Amandine Guerineau, Leslie Boudesocque, Damien Costa, Laurent Bazinet, Cécile Enguehard-Gueiffier and Christine Imbert

      Version of Record online: 10 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12168

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      This study investigated for the first time the interest of crude extracts of cranberry and cranberry juice fractions to prevent biofilms of different species of Candida spp.

  5. Short Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. MiniReviews
    5. Research Articles
    6. Short Communications
    1. Formation of hydroxyl radicals contributes to the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms (pages 440–443)

      Peter Ø. Jensen, Alejandra Briales, Rikke P. Brochmann, Hengzhuang Wang, Kasper N. Kragh, Mette Kolpen, Casper Hempel, Thomas Bjarnsholt, Niels Høiby and Oana Ciofu

      Version of Record online: 10 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12120

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      Our study shows that reactive oxygen species are formed during treatment with ciprofloxacin of biofilm-growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and this contributes to the killing of part of the biofilm.

    2. Alterations in the Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm transcriptome following interaction with whole human blood (pages 444–448)

      Angela França, Virgínia Carvalhais, Tomás Maira-Litrán, Manuel Vilanova, Nuno Cerca and Gerald Pier

      Version of Record online: 10 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12130

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      Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms survival in human blood is linked with the metabolism of essential molecules as well as iron acquisition rather than expression of aggressive virulence factors.

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