Pathogens and Disease

Cover image for Vol. 71 Issue 2

Special Issue: Biosecurity

July 2014

Volume 71, Issue 2

Pages i–ii, 93–285

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentary
    5. MiniReviews
    6. Research Articles
    7. Short Communication
    1. Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Article first published online: 14 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12091

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentary
    5. MiniReviews
    6. Research Articles
    7. Short Communication
    1. Emerging infections, biosecurity and public health (page 93)

      Gerald Byrne and Kelly Stefano Cole

      Article first published online: 14 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12198

  3. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentary
    5. MiniReviews
    6. Research Articles
    7. Short Communication
    1. Containing infectious disease (pages 94–95)

      Michael G. Kurilla

      Article first published online: 14 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12196

    2. Communication and computing technology in biocontainment laboratories using the NEIDL as a model (pages 96–101)

      John McCall and Kath Hardcastle

      Article first published online: 10 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12159

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      A flexible computing infrastructure and end user involvement will be a dynamic process that will help to advance science at the NEIDL.

  4. MiniReviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentary
    5. MiniReviews
    6. Research Articles
    7. Short Communication
    1. Biocontainment laboratory risk assessment: perspectives and considerations (pages 102–108)

      Amy Patterson, Kelly Fennington, Ryan Bayha, Diane Wax, Rona Hirschberg, Nancy Boyd and Michael Kurilla

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12162

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      NIH/NIAID's perspectives about biocontainment laboratory risk assessment are discussed.

    2. The carrying pigeons of the cell: exosomes and their role in infectious diseases caused by human pathogens (pages 109–120)

      Adam Fleming, Gavin Sampey, Myung-Chul Chung, Charles Bailey, Monique L. van Hoek, Fatah Kashanchi and Ramin M. Hakami

      Article first published online: 24 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12135

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      The past several years have witnessed an explosion of research into intercellular communication roles of exosomes. This review synthesizes the current understanding of their role in human infectious diseases.

    3. The emergence of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (pages 121–136)

      Shauna Milne-Price, Kerri L. Miazgowicz and Vincent J. Munster

      Article first published online: 9 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12166

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      Excellent review on timely and newly emerging infectious diseases.

    4. The role of viral persistence in flavivirus biology (pages 137–163)

      Luwanika Mlera, Wessam Melik and Marshall E. Bloom

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12178

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      Persistent infections by vector-borne flaviviruses are an important, but inadequately studied topic.

    5. The use of Nanotrap particles for biodefense and emerging infectious disease diagnostics (pages 164–176)

      Nazly Shafagati, Alexis Patanarut, Alessandra Luchini, Lindsay Lundberg, Charles Bailey, Emanuel Petricoin III, Lance Liotta, Aarthi Narayanan, Benjamin Lepene and Kylene Kehn-Hall

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12136

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      The Nanotrap particles are a versatile sample preparation technology that has far reaching implications for biomarker discovery and diagnostic assays.

    6. Proteomic strategies for the discovery of novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets for infectious diseases (pages 177–189)

      Moushimi Amaya, Alan Baer, Kelsey Voss, Catherine Campbell, Claudius Mueller, Charles Bailey, Kylene Kehn-Hall, Emanuel Petricoin III and Aarthi Narayanan

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12150

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      Reverse Phase protein MicroArray (RPMA) and Mass Spectrometry (MS) are quantitative proteomics strategies for understanding host–pathogen interactions in virus-infected cells.

    7. Systems kinomics for characterizing host responses to high-consequence pathogens at the NIH/NIAID Integrated Research Facility-Frederick (pages 190–198)

      Jason Kindrachuk, Shane Falcinelli, Jiro Wada, Jens H. Kuhn, Lisa E. Hensley and Peter B. Jahrling

      Article first published online: 10 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12163

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      Kinome analysis at the IRF-Frederick to identify novel information regarding the molecular pathogenesis of high-consequence pathogens and novel therapeutic targets.

    8. Recent developments in experimental animal models of Henipavirus infection (pages 199–206)

      Barry Rockx

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12149

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      Review of current animal models of henipaviruses available for studying disease and testing treatments.

    9. In vivo imaging in an ABSL-3 regional biocontainment laboratory (pages 207–212)

      Charles A. Scanga, Brian J. Lopresti, Jaime Tomko, Lonnie J. Frye, Teresa M. Coleman, Daniel Fillmore, Jonathan P. Carney, Philana L. Lin, JoAnne L. Flynn, Christina L. Gardner, Chengqun Sun, William B. Klimstra, Kate D. Ryman, Douglas S. Reed, Daniel J. Fisher and Kelly S. Cole

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12186

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      In vivo imaging of highly pathogenic viruses and bacteria allow for real-time evaluation of disease progression and treatment without the need for serial sacrifice, an advancement in the development of novel vaccines and therapeutics modalities.

    10. The NIAID Integrated Research Facility at Frederick, Maryland: a unique international resource to facilitate medical countermeasure development for BSL-4 pathogens (pages 213–218)

      Peter B. Jahrling, Lauren Keith, Marisa St. Claire, Reed F. Johnson, Laura Bollinger, Matthew G. Lackemeyer, Lisa E. Hensley, Jason Kindrachuk and Jens H. Kuhn

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12171

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      We present an overview of the unique infrastructure and capabilities of the Integrated Research Facility in the investigation of high-consequence pathogens.

  5. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentary
    5. MiniReviews
    6. Research Articles
    7. Short Communication
    1. Development of novel mechanisms for housing, handling, and remote monitoring of common marmosets at animal biosafety level 3 (pages 219–226)

      Diana S. Powell, Reagan C. Walker, Dennis T. Heflin, Dan Fisher, Joseph B. Kosky, Lesley C. Homer, Douglas S. Reed, Kelly Stefano-Cole, Anita M. Trichel and Amy L. Hartman

      Article first published online: 24 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12140

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      The authors review the caging, handling, and safety-related adaptations and modifications that were required to humanely utilize marmosets as a model for high-hazard BSL-3 viral diseases.

    2. Differences in aerosolization of Rift Valley fever virus resulting from choice of inhalation exposure chamber: implications for animal challenge studies (pages 227–233)

      Douglas S. Reed, Laura M. Bethel, Diana S. Powell, Amy L. Caroline and Amy L. Hartman

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12157

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      The aerosol characteristics of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) were evaluated to achieve reproducible infection of experimental animals with aerosolized RVFV suitable for animal efficacy studies.

    3. Mapping complex traits using families of recombinant inbred strains: an overview and example of mapping susceptibility to Candida albicans induced illness phenotypes (pages 234–248)

      Linda A. Toth, Rita A. Trammell and Robert W. Williams

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12160

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      To illustrate the use of the systems genetics approach to infectious disease, we designed a simple study using three complementary mouse families that are differentially susceptible to intravenous challenge with the yeast Candida albicans.

    4. Genetic control of weight loss during pneumonic Burkholderia pseudomallei infection (pages 249–264)

      Felicia D. Emery, Jyothi Parvathareddy, Ashutosh K. Pandey, Yan Cui, Robert W. Williams and Mark A. Miller

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12172

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      Genome-wide linkage analysis was used to identify host genetic loci that control variable weight loss kinetics of distinct inbred strains of mice following pneumonic Burkholderia pseudomallei infection.

    5. Remote monitoring of the progression of primary pneumonic plague in Brown Norway rats in high-capacity, high-containment housing (pages 265–275)

      Eric A. Coate, Andrew G. Kocsis, Kristen N. Peters, Paul E. Anderson, Mark R. Ellersieck, Deborah M. Fine and Deborah M. Anderson

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12176

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      Understanding pneumonic plague through biotelemetric monitoring of Brown Norway rats following challenge by inhalation exposure to Yersinia pestis.

    6. Efficient inactivation of Burkholderia pseudomallei or Francisella tularensis in infected cells for safe removal from biosafety level 3 containment laboratories (pages 276–281)

      Felicia D. Emery, Jennifer M. Stabenow and Mark A. Miller

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12138

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      This report establishes an SOP for chemical sterilization of cells infected with Burkholderia pseudomallei or Francisella tularensis, enabling removal of the samples from BSL-3 containment for downstream flow cytometric/cell sorting studies.

  6. Short Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Commentary
    5. MiniReviews
    6. Research Articles
    7. Short Communication
    1. Establishing protocols for tick containment at Biosafety Level 4 (pages 282–285)

      Saravanan Thangamani and Dennis Bente

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12187

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this report we describe the procedures and protocols to establish tick work in BSL4 laboratory.

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