You have free access to this content

FEMS Microbiology Reviews

Cover image for Vol. 35 Issue 5

Special Issue: Antibiotic Resistance

September 2011

Volume 35, Issue 5

Pages 705–991

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Review Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Multilevel population genetics in antibiotic resistance (pages 705–706)

      Fernando Baquero and Teresa M. Coque

      Version of Record online: 19 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2011.00293.x

  2. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Review Articles
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Lateral genetic transfer and the construction of genetic exchange communities (pages 707–735)

      Elizabeth Skippington and Mark A. Ragan

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2010.00261.x

      Differential opportunity and barriers to lateral genetic transfer create bacterial communities of exchange.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Multiresistant Gram-negative bacteria: the role of high-risk clones in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance (pages 736–755)

      Neil Woodford, Jane F. Turton and David M. Livermore

      Version of Record online: 1 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2011.00268.x

      We explore the spread of resistance in Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the importance of tenacious ‘high risk clones’ with flexible abilities to accumulate and switch resistance mechanisms.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Multilevel populations and the evolution of antibiotic resistance through horizontal gene transfer (pages 756–767)

      Cheryl P. Andam, Gregory P. Fournier and Johann Peter Gogarten

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2011.00274.x

      Resistance to naturally occurring antibiotics may lead to the maintenance of different types of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in Bacteria through gene transfer.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Metabolic regulation of antibiotic resistance (pages 768–789)

      José L. Martínez and Fernando Rojo

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2011.00282.x

      Global metabolic regulators are involved in modulating bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics and this kind of metabolic adaptation may trigger antibiotic resistance during infection.

    5. You have free access to this content
      Gene flow, mobile genetic elements and the recruitment of antibiotic resistance genes into Gram-negative pathogens (pages 790–819)

      Hatch W. Stokes and Michael R. Gillings

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2011.00273.x

      This review explores the evolutionary forces driving the spread of antibiotic resistance genes in microbial communities.

    6. You have free access to this content
      Analysis of antibiotic resistance regions in Gram-negative bacteria (pages 820–855)

      Sally R. Partridge

      Version of Record online: 16 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2011.00277.x

      Antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria is often mediated by complex conglomerations of multiple resistance genes and associated mobile elements that undergo combinatorial evolution by processes which can only be fully understood by detailed analysis of many such regions.

    7. You have free access to this content
      Tn916-like genetic elements: a diverse group of modular mobile elements conferring antibiotic resistance (pages 856–871)

      Adam P. Roberts and Peter Mullany

      Version of Record online: 4 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2011.00283.x

      In this review we explore the diversity of the Tn916 / Tn1545 family of mobile genetic elements in four major Gram positive pathogens and show that these elements are central to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among these pathogens.

    8. You have free access to this content
      Population biology of Gram-positive pathogens: high-risk clones for dissemination of antibiotic resistance (pages 872–900)

      Rob J.L. Willems, William P. Hanage, Debra E. Bessen and Edward J. Feil

      Version of Record online: 4 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2011.00284.x

      Multi locus sequence typing has improved world-wide tracking of clinically relevant (i.e particularly virulent or resistant) circulating enterococcal, pneumococcal, group A streptococcal and staphylococcal clones and provided a more detailed insight into the population structure and evolutionary history of these opportunistic pathogens.

    9. You have free access to this content
      Persistence of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations (pages 901–911)

      Dan I. Andersson and Diarmaid Hughes

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2011.00289.x

      Several mechanisms are contributing to the stability of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations and even if antibiotic use is reduced it is likely that most resistance mechanisms will persist for considerable times.

    10. You have free access to this content
      Combinatorial events of insertion sequences and ICE in Gram-negative bacteria (pages 912–935)

      Mark A. Toleman and Timothy R. Walsh

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2011.00294.x

      Antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria is dominated by unusual combinatorial mistakes of Insertion sequences and gene fusions which have been selected and amplified by antibiotic pressure enabling the formation of extended resistance islands.

    11. You have free access to this content
      Identification of bacterial plasmids based on mobility and plasmid population biology (pages 936–956)

      Maria Pilar Garcillán-Barcia, Andrés Alvarado and Fernando de la Cruz

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2011.00291.x

      We discuss in this review how the existing diversity in plasmid genetic structures gives rise to a large diversity in propagation strategies. We would like to propose that, by using an identification methodology based on plasmid mobility types, we can follow the propagation routes of most plasmids in ?-proteobacteria, as well as their cargo genes, in complex ecosystems.

    12. You have free access to this content
      Origins of bacterial diversity through horizontal genetic transfer and adaptation to new ecological niches (pages 957–976)

      Jane Wiedenbeck and Frederick M. Cohan

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2011.00292.x

      This paper reviews the features of bacterial genetics that allow HGT, the similarities between organisms that foster HGT between them, the limits to the kinds of adaptations that can be transferred, and amelioration of fitness costs associated with HGT; the paper also reviews approaches to discover the origins of new, ecologically distinct bacterial populations and the role that HGT plays in their founding.

    13. You have free access to this content
      Emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance following exposure to antibiotics (pages 977–991)

      Rafael Cantón and María-Isabel Morosini

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2011.00295.x

      Emergence of a resistant bacterial subpopulation within a susceptible wild-type population can be restricted with a regimen using an antibiotic dose that is sufficiently high to inhibit both susceptible and resistant bacteria.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION