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FEMS Microbiology Reviews

Cover image for Vol. 36 Issue 3

Special Issue: Intracellular Pathogens and Persistence

May 2012

Volume 36, Issue 3

Pages 513–760

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Review Articles
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      Persistent intracellular pathogens (page 513)

      Christoph Dehio, Colin Berry and Ralf Bartenschlager

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2012.00336.x

  2. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Review Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Mycobacterium tuberculosis: success through dormancy (pages 514–532)

      Martin Gengenbacher and Stefan H.E. Kaufmann

      Article first published online: 8 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2012.00331.x

      The shift from a state of metabolic and replicative activity to a state of dormancy as vital part of the survival stratagem of Mtb in the host is increasingly appreciated.

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      Internal affairs: investigating the Brucella intracellular lifestyle (pages 533–562)

      Kristine von Bargen, Jean-Pierre Gorvel and Suzana P. Salcedo

      Article first published online: 22 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2012.00334.x

      Recent advances in the understanding of the Brucella intracellular trafficking and bacterial factors required for a successful intracellular lifestyle

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      Persistence of Bartonella spp. stealth pathogens: from subclinical infections to vasoproliferative tumor formation (pages 563–599)

      Arto T. Pulliainen and Christoph Dehio

      Article first published online: 7 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2012.00324.x

      This review will outline the current molecular knowledge how members of the arthropod-borne genus Bartonella spp. efficiently persist in their mammalian hosts to cause the typical chronic and relapsing bacteremia, which in some immunosuppressive conditions such as in AIDS is manifested by the growth of tumor-like vascular deformations.

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      Salmonella's long-term relationship with its host (pages 600–615)

      Thomas Ruby, Laura McLaughlin, Smita Gopinath and Denise Monack

      Article first published online: 9 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2012.00332.x

      This review discusses current knowledge about mechanisms Salmonella uses to persist systemically for long period of time in its host.

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      Host–pathogen checkpoints and population bottlenecks in persistent and intracellular uropathogenic Escherichia coli bladder infection (pages 616–648)

      Thomas J. Hannan, Makrina Totsika, Kylie J. Mansfield, Kate H. Moore, Mark A. Schembri and Scott J. Hultgren

      Article first published online: 2 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2012.00339.x

      Urinary tract infections are an increasingly troublesome public health concern due to rapidly rising antibiotic resistance among uropathogenic bacteria worldwide. Here we highlight recent studies of intracellular and persistent uropathogenic E. coli during infections of the urinary bladder, focusing on the identification of host-pathogen checkpoints and bacterial population bottlenecks during acute and chronic cystitis that present opportunities for developing new therapeutic strategies.

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      Measles virus, immune control, and persistence (pages 649–662)

      Diane E. Griffin, Wen-Hsuan Lin and Chien-Hsiung Pan

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2012.00330.x

      Measles is an acute virus infection that is associated with prolonged virus clearance and risk of persistent infection.

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      Failure of innate and adaptive immune responses in controlling hepatitis C virus infection (pages 663–683)

      Robert Thimme, Marco Binder and Ralf Bartenschlager

      Article first published online: 4 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2011.00319.x

      Hepatitis C virus utilizes several different mechanisms to evade innate and adaptive immune responses and has thus a unique opportunity to establish viral persistence in the majority of acutely infected patients.

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      The molecular basis of herpes simplex virus latency (pages 684–705)

      Michael P. Nicoll, João T. Proença and Stacey Efstathiou

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2011.00320.x

      This review considers current knowledge and hypotheses relating to the mechanisms involved in the establishment, maintenance and reactivation herpes simplex virus latency.

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      HIV latency: experimental systems and molecular models (pages 706–716)

      Shweta Hakre, Leonard Chavez, Kotaro Shirakawa and Eric Verdin

      Article first published online: 2 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2012.00335.x

      The review focuses on documenting the experiments done in the field in studying the molecular mechanisms of HIV latency from a heterochromatic angle as well as reviewing the primary latency models reported thus far.

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      Mechanisms of Toxoplasma gondii persistence and latency (pages 717–733)

      William J. Sullivan Jr and Victoria Jeffers

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2011.00305.x

      This review describes the molecular mechanisms orchestrating the development of latent tissue cysts of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, a process that is critical to pathogenesis and transmission.

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      Host cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi: a unique strategy that promotes persistence (pages 734–747)

      Maria Cecilia Fernandes and Norma W. Andrews

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2012.00333.x

      Persistence of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi in its host is related to its remarkable ability to invade many different cell types, by taking advantage of the mechanism responsible for repairing membrane wounds.

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      T cell response and persistence of the microsporidia (pages 748–760)

      Kaya Ghosh and Louis M. Weiss

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-6976.2011.00318.x

      The T cell response to the microsporidia is reviewed and its role in immune evasion mechanisms and survival strategies of these pathogens is discussed.

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