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FEMS Yeast Research

Cover image for Vol. 14 Issue 1

Special Issue: Yeast Cell Aging and Death

February 2014

Volume 14, Issue 1

Pages i–iii, 1–212

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. MiniReviews
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      Issue Information (pages i–iii)

      Version of Record online: 7 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12077

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. MiniReviews
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      Yeast cell aging and death (page 1)

      Dina Petranovic and Austen Ganley

      Version of Record online: 2 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12130

  3. MiniReviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. MiniReviews
    1. You have free access to this content
      The expanding role of yeast in cancer research and diagnosis: insights into the function of the oncosuppressors p53 and BRCA1/2 (pages 2–16)

      Nicoletta Guaragnella, Vanessa Palermo, Alvaro Galli, Loredana Moro, Cristina Mazzoni and Sergio Giannattasio

      Version of Record online: 30 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12094

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      Use of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism to get new insights into p53 and BRCA1/2 function for cancer research and diagnosis.

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      Molecular mechanisms linking the evolutionary conserved TORC1–Sch9 nutrient signalling branch to lifespan regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (pages 17–32)

      Erwin Swinnen, Ruben Ghillebert, Tobias Wilms and Joris Winderickx

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12097

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      Many of the mechanisms linking the TORC1 – Sch9 signalling pathway to the regulation of yeast life span are evolutionary conserved in higher eukaryotes, highlighting the value of yeast as a model system for studying molecular events regulating cellular aging.

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      Reactive oxygen species, ageing and the hormesis police (pages 33–39)

      Paula Ludovico and William C. Burhans

      Version of Record online: 9 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12070

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      We review accumulating evidence pointing to hydrogen peroxide as a major inducer of hormesis effects that protect against oxidative stress and impact aging in a variety of eukaryotic organisms.

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      Protein quality control in time and space – links to cellular aging (pages 40–48)

      Thomas Nyström and Beidong Liu

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12095

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      Protein quality control in time and space and its links to cellular aging.

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      Ribosomal DNA and cellular senescence: new evidence supporting the connection between rDNA and aging (pages 49–59)

      Austen R. D. Ganley and Takehiko Kobayashi

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12133

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      This review discusses recent evidence that supports a fundamental role for instability of the ribosomal DNA repeats in yeast replicative aging and offers a revised model for this rDNA theory of aging.

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      Cellular redox homeostasis, reactive oxygen species and replicative ageing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (pages 60–72)

      Anita Ayer, Campbell W. Gourlay and Ian W. Dawes

      Version of Record online: 8 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12114

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      This review discusses the changes in reactive oxygen species and redox state in different cellular compartments that occur as cells undergo ageing.

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      Yeast sirtuins and the regulation of aging (pages 73–88)

      Margaret B. Wierman and Jeffrey S. Smith

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12115

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      This review discusses the roles of conserved NAD-dependent protein deacetylases, the sirtuins, in promoting longevity of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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      Actin – a biosensor that determines cell fate in yeasts (pages 89–95)

      Daniel G.J. Smethurst, Ian W. Dawes and Campbell W. Gourlay

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12119

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      The actin cystoskeleton is imbedded within a number of signalling pathways that connect environmental sensing to cell fate and in this way actin functionality can act as a rheostat that monitors cell health.

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      Aging and differentiation in yeast populations: elders with different properties and functions (pages 96–108)

      Zdena Palková, Derek Wilkinson and Libuše Váchová

      Version of Record online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12103

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      Although considered unicellular, cells of baker yeast are able to differentiate within multicellular populations and to form different types of non-dividing cells (elders) with different properties and functions.

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      Approaches to study yeast cell aging and death (pages 109–118)

      Mario G. Mirisola, Ralf J. Braun and Dina Petranovic

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12112

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      Yeast is a widely used model system that has come to be utilized as an important aging model and here we review some of the methodology used to study aging in yeast.

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      Aging and cell death in the other yeasts, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Candida albicans (pages 119–135)

      Su-Ju Lin and Nicanor Austriaco

      Version of Record online: 8 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12113

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      We survey the progress made in the study of both aging and programmed cell death in the other yeast models, the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and the human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans.

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      Rebels with a cause: molecular features and physiological consequences of yeast prions (pages 136–147)

      David M. Garcia and Daniel F. Jarosz

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12116

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      Long viewed as agents of disease, the self-perpetuating protein conformations of prions are emerging as common mechanism for inheritance of adaptive traits in fungi.

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      Yeast replicative aging: a paradigm for defining conserved longevity interventions (pages 148–159)

      Brian M. Wasko and Matt Kaeberlein

      Version of Record online: 30 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12104

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      A review of using the yeast replicative lifespan model of aging as a paradigm for determining conserved mechanisms to extend lifespan.

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      The yeast model system as a tool towards the understanding of apoptosis regulation by sphingolipids (pages 160–178)

      António Rego, Dário Trindade, Susana R. Chaves, Stéphen Manon, Vítor Costa, Maria João Sousa and Manuela Côrte-Real

      Version of Record online: 14 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12096

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      Bakers yeast can be used to understand how sphingolipids regulate cell death, with potential impact on novel therapies against human diseases associated with alterations of sphingolipid-dependent cell suicide processes.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: The yeast model system as a tool towards the understanding of apoptosis regulation by sphingolipids

      Vol. 14, Issue 6, 995, Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2014

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      Lipids and cell death in yeast (pages 179–197)

      Tobias Eisenberg and Sabrina Büttner

      Version of Record online: 30 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12105

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      This review summarizes recent advances in the field of lipotoxicity in yeast, including sphingolipid-modulated and fatty acid-induced cell death as well as the connection of general lipid metabolism to cell death and aging.

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      Mitochondria in ageing: there is metabolism beyond the ROS (pages 198–212)

      Michael Breitenbach, Mark Rinnerthaler, Johannes Hartl, Anna Stincone, Jakob Vowinckel, Hannelore Breitenbach-Koller and Markus Ralser

      Version of Record online: 16 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12134

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      We review the role of three mitochondrial metabolic functions that are often neglected in ageing research: biosynthesis of Fe/S clusters, central carbon metabolism and mitophagy.

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