Genotype modulates age-related alterations in sensitivity to the aversive effects of ethanol: an eight inbred strain analysis of conditioned taste aversion

Authors

  • E. M. Moore,

    1. Department of Psychology, Center for Development and Behavioral Neuroscience, Binghamton University – SUNY, Binghamton, NY, USA
    2. Department of Psychology, Purdue School of Science, Indiana Alcohol Research Center, Psychobiology of Addictions, Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), Indianapolis, IN, USA
    3. Present address: Center for Behavioral Teratology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA
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  • R. D. Forrest IV,

    1. Department of Psychology, Purdue School of Science, Indiana Alcohol Research Center, Psychobiology of Addictions, Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), Indianapolis, IN, USA
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  • S. L. Boehm II

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychology, Purdue School of Science, Indiana Alcohol Research Center, Psychobiology of Addictions, Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), Indianapolis, IN, USA
    • Department of Psychology, Center for Development and Behavioral Neuroscience, Binghamton University – SUNY, Binghamton, NY, USA
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Corresponding author: S. L. Boehm II, Psychobiology of Addictions, Department of Psychology, Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis, 402 N. Blackford St., LD 124, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. E-mail: slboehm@iupui.edu

Abstract

Adolescent individuals display altered behavioral sensitivity to ethanol, which may contribute to the increased ethanol consumption seen in this age-group. However, genetics also exert considerable influence on both ethanol intake and sensitivity. Currently there is little research assessing the combined influence of developmental and genetic alcohol sensitivities. Sensitivity to the aversive effects of ethanol using a conditioned taste aversion (CTA) procedure was measured during both adolescence (P30) and adulthood (P75) in eight inbred mouse strains (C57BL/6J, DBA/2J, 129S1/SvImJ, A/J, BALB/cByJ, BTBR T+tf/J, C3H/HeJ and FVB/NJ). Adolescent and adult mice were water deprived, and subsequently provided with access to 0.9% (v/v) NaCl solution for 1 h. Immediately following access mice were administered ethanol (0, 1.5, 2.25 and 3 g/kg, ip). This procedure was repeated in 72 h intervals for a total of five CTA trials. Sensitivity to the aversive effects of ethanol was highly dependent upon both strain and age. Within an inbred strain, adolescent animals were consistently less sensitive to the aversive effects of ethanol than their adult counterparts. However, the dose of ethanol required to produce an aversion response differed as a function of both age and strain.

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