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Genes, Brain and Behavior

Cover image for Vol. 11 Issue 8

November 2012

Volume 11, Issue 8

Pages 889–1033, ii–ii

  1. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Review
    3. Original Articles
    4. Referees
    5. IBANGS
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      The canid genome: behavioral geneticists' best friend? (pages 889–902)

      N. J. Hall and C. D. L. Wynne

      Article first published online: 12 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1601-183X.2012.00851.x

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      Current research on the genetic contributions to canid behavior is reviewed.

  2. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Review
    3. Original Articles
    4. Referees
    5. IBANGS
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      Positive selection on NIN, a gene involved in neurogenesis, and primate brain evolution (pages 903–910)

      S. H. Montgomery and N. I. Mundy

      Article first published online: 27 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1601-183X.2012.00844.x

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      NIN, a gene that functions in neurogenesis, evolved adaptively in primates and shows associations with brain size.

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      A novel QTL underlying early-onset, low-frequency hearing loss in BXD recombinant inbred strains (pages 911–920)

      A. P. Nagtegaal, S. Spijker, T. T. H. Crins, Neuro-Bsik Mouse Phenomics Consortium and J. G. G. Borst

      Article first published online: 8 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1601-183X.2012.00845.x

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      A novel QTL on chromosome 18, ahl9, underlying early-onset, low-frequency hearing loss in BXD recombinant inbred strains.

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      Family history interview of a broad phenotype in specific language impairment and matched controls (pages 921–927)

      N. Kalnak, M. Peyrard-Janvid, B. Sahlén and H. Forssberg

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1601-183X.2012.00841.x

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      Significantly higher prevalence rates of language, literacy, learning and social-communication problems in relatives of SLI probands.

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      Absence of deficits in social behaviors and ultrasonic vocalizations in later generations of mice lacking neuroligin4 (pages 928–941)

      E. Ey, M. Yang, A. M. Katz, L. Woldeyohannes, J. L. Silverman, C. S. Leblond, P. Faure, N. Torquet, A.-M. Le Sourd, T. Bourgeron and J. N. Crawley

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1601-183X.2012.00849.x

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      Our findings indicate an absence of autism-relevant behavioral phenotypes in later generations of Nlgn4 mice tested at two locations. Testing environment and methods differed from the original study in some aspects, although the presence of normal sociability was seen in all genotypes when methods taken from Jamain et al. (2008) were used. The divergent results obtained in the present studies indicate that phenotypes may not be replicable across breeding generations, and highlight the significant roles of environmental, generational and/or procedural factors on behavioral phenotypes.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Corrigendum

      Vol. 12, Issue 7, 748, Article first published online: 1 OCT 2013

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      Body mass index and depressive symptoms: instrumental-variables regression with genetic risk score (pages 942–948)

      M. Jokela, M. Elovainio, L. Keltikangas-Järvinen, G. D. Batty, M. Hintsanen, I. Seppälä, M. Kähönen, J. S. Viikari, O. T. Raitakari, T. Lehtimäki and M. Kivimäki

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1601-183X.2012.00846.x

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      Instrumental variables regression with genetic risk score suggests a causal association between high BMI and depressive symptoms.

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      Genetic load is associated with hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis dysregulation in macaques (pages 949–957)

      B. Ferguson, J. E. Hunter, J. Luty, S. L. Street, A. Woodall and K. A. Grant

      Article first published online: 13 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1601-183X.2012.00856.x

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      Significant association between genetic load in the CRH, TPH2 and SLC6A4 genes and level of dexamethasone suppression of ACTH in rhesus macaques

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      Interacting effect of BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and stressful life events on adolescent depression (pages 958–965)

      J. Chen, X. Li and M. McGue

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1601-183X.2012.00843.x

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      The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism interacts with recent stressful life events and has impact on adolescent depressive symptoms.

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      Hippocampal SPARC regulates depression-related behavior (pages 966–976)

      M. Campolongo, L. Benedetti, O. L. Podhajcer, F. Pitossi and A. M. Depino

      Article first published online: 27 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1601-183X.2012.00848.x

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      SPARC participates in the programming and expression of anxiety- and depression-related behaviors.

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      Genotype-dependent consequences of traumatic stress in four inbred mouse strains (pages 977–985)

      K. Szklarczyk, M. Korostynski, S. Golda, W. Solecki and R. Przewlocki

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1601-183X.2012.00850.x

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      The work indicates associations between the molecular and behavioural consequences of traumatic stress in different inbred mouse strains. C57BL/6J mice exhibited up-regulation in the expression of Tsc22d3, Nfkbia, Plat and Crhr1 genes in the amygdala and hippocampus as well as the broadest spectrum of behavioural symptoms. Whereas, SWR/J mice displayed increase only in Pdyn expression in the amygdala and had the lowest conditioned fear. These two strains can serve as models of stress susceptibility and stress resilience, respectively. We found potential links between the alterations in expression of Tsc22d3, Nfkbia and Pdyn, and different aspects of vulnerability to stress.

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      COMT val158met predicts reward responsiveness in humans (pages 986–992)

      T. M. Lancaster, D. E. Linden and E. A. Heerey

      Article first published online: 7 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1601-183X.2012.00838.x

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      Met /met participants showed significantly greater response bias than val/met or val/val groups. Error bars span 3 Ã IQR (interquartile range).

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      Acute behavioral effects of nicotine in male and female HINT1 knockout mice (pages 993–1000)

      K. J. Jackson, J. B. Wang, E. Barbier, X. Chen and M. I. Damaj

      Article first published online: 4 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1601-183X.2012.00827.x

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      HINT1 is associated with acute nicotine behaviors and a general anxiety phenotype. These associations are sex specific.

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      Modifying the role of serotonergic 5-HTTLPR and TPH2 variants on disulfiram treatment of cocaine addiction: a preliminary study (pages 1001–1008)

      D. A. Nielsen, M. J. Harding, S. C. Hamon, W. Huang and T. R. Kosten

      Article first published online: 27 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1601-183X.2012.00839.x

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      Disulfiram is a cocaine pharmacotherapy that may act through increasing serotonin, benefiting patients with genetically low serotonin transporter levels and low serotonin synthesis. The role of variants in SLC6A4 5-HTTLPR and TPH2 (1125A>T) in cocaine and opioid co-dependent patients were evaluated for their role in moderating disulfiram treatment for cocaine dependence (Fig. 1. Interaction of the 5-HTTLPR S′S′/L′L′S′ genotype, the TPH2 AA/AT genotype, and the 5-HTTLPR S′S′/L′S′: TPH2 AA/TT genotype pattern with percentage of cocaine-positive urines.). Cocaine-positive urines dropped for the disulfiram group among the 5-HTTLPR S′ allele carriers, the TPH2 A allele carriers, and in patients with both an S′ allele and a TPH2 AA allele, with no change in the placebo groups.

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      LPA5 receptor plays a role in pain sensitivity, emotional exploration and reversal learning (pages 1009–1019)

      Z. Callaerts-Vegh, S. Leo, B. Vermaercke, T. Meert and Rudi D'Hooge

      Article first published online: 8 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1601-183X.2012.00840.x

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      Deficiency in LPA5 has no effect on cognition, but alters motivational and anxiety-related behavior.

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      Loss of EphA4 impairs short-term spatial recognition memory performance and locomotor habituation (pages 1020–1031)

      R. Willi, C. Winter, F. Wieske, A. Kempf, B. K. Yee, M. E. Schwab and P. Singer

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1601-183X.2012.00842.x

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      Homozygous EphA4 deletion impairs spatial recognition memory (a & b), and attenuates locomotor habituation (b).

  3. Referees

    1. Top of page
    2. Review
    3. Original Articles
    4. Referees
    5. IBANGS
    1. You have free access to this content
      Referees for Volume 11 (pages 1032–1033)

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1601-183X.2012.00869.x

  4. IBANGS

    1. Top of page
    2. Review
    3. Original Articles
    4. Referees
    5. IBANGS
    1. You have free access to this content

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