Genes, Brain and Behavior

Cover image for Vol. 13 Issue 5

June 2014

Volume 13, Issue 5

Pages i–iii, 451–517

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Articles
    4. Book Review
  2. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Articles
    4. Book Review
    1. Extinction of an instrumental response: a cognitive behavioral assay in Fmr1 knockout mice (pages 451–458)

      M. S. Sidorov, D. D. Krueger, M. Taylor, E. Gisin, E. K. Osterweil and M. F. Bear

      Article first published online: 30 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/gbb.12137

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Instrumental extinction is exaggerated in Fmr1 KO mice. (a) Schematic shows a test with one acquisition phase, followed by 5 days of extinction. (b) Days to acquisition and (c) performance during acquisition are normal in Fmr1 KO mice. (d) Extinction of correct responding is significantly exaggerated in Fmr1 KO mice (***P = 0.001, repeated measures two-way anova) and post hoc tests show significant exaggeration at days 1–4 (*P < 0.05). (e) Normalization shows significantly exaggerated extinction in Fmr1 KO mice (***P = 0.001), and post hoc tests show a significant exaggeration at day 1 (**P < 0.01). There is no effect of Fmr1 genotype on incorrect responses (f,g) or on the rate of correct responses (h,i).

    2. Social cognition and underlying cognitive mechanisms in children with an extra X chromosome: a comparison with autism spectrum disorder (pages 459–467)

      S. van Rijn, L. Stockmann, G. van Buggenhout, C. van Ravenswaaij-Arts and H. Swaab

      Article first published online: 7 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/gbb.12134

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      Individuals with an extra X chromosome are at increased risk for autism symptoms. This study showed that, similar to children with ASD, boys and girls with an extra X chromosome have significant impairments in theory of mind and facial affect recognition. Social cognitive deficits were not limited to children with a ‘typical autism phenotype’, and thus not specific for ASD but also observed in children with mild or late presenting autism symptoms. Based on regression analyses showing that different cognitive functions predicted social cognitive skills in the extra X and ASD groups, we speculate that there are various pathways to social dysfuntion. Studying individuals with an extra X chromosome may help gain insight in these pathways.

    3. NCAM deficiency in the mouse forebrain impairs innate and learned avoidance behaviours (pages 468–477)

      J. Brandewiede, O. Stork and M. Schachner

      Article first published online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/gbb.12138

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      Passive avoidance learning is disturbed in conditional NCAM null mutant mice.

    4. A transgenic zebrafish model for monitoring glucocorticoid receptor activity (pages 478–487)

      R. G. Krug II, T. L. Poshusta, K. J. Skuster, M. R. Berg, S. L. Gardner and K. J. Clark

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/gbb.12135

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      Glucocorticoid signaling induces tissue-specific, glucocorticoid receptor-dependent transgene activation.

    5. Abnormal vibrissa-related behavior and loss of barrel field inhibitory neurons in 5xFAD transgenics (pages 488–500)

      T. J. Flanigan, Y. Xue, S. Kishan Rao, A. Dhanushkodi and M. P. McDonald

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/gbb.12133

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      Whiskerless 5xFAD transgenics behave normally in the first 90 seconds of the plus-maze session. The whiskers of 5xFAD transgenic and wild-type mice were snipped at 14 months of age. A small group of age-matched mice with a full complement of whiskers served as controls. (a,c) Whiskered wild-type mice spent more time on the closed arms and tended to habituate to the closed arms as the session progressed, whereas the whiskered transgenics persisted in avoiding the closed arms. (b,d) The behavior of whiskerless 5xFAD transgenics in the first 90 seconds of the session was indistinguishable from that of wild-type mice, and genotype differences were attributable to behavior later in the session when wild-type mice habituated to the closed arms.

    6. Genetic effects on information processing speed are moderated by age – converging results from three samples (pages 501–507)

      M. Ising, K. A. Mather, P. Zimmermann, T. Brückl, N. Höhne, A. Heck, L. A. Schenk, D. Rujescu, N. J. Armstrong, P. S. Sachdev and S. Reppermund

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/gbb.12132

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      Our GWAS findings demonstrate opposing effects of DSG1 variants on information processing speed depending on the age of the individual.

    7. Association between genes, stressful childhood events and processing bias in depression vulnerable individuals (pages 508–516)

      J. N. Vrijsen, I. van Oostrom, A. Arias-Vásquez, B. Franke, E. S. Becker and A. Speckens

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/gbb.12129

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      Our findings endorse the association of BDNF and COMT with childhood stress and depression and provide a possible intermediate, i.e. biased processing of positive information.

  3. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Articles
    4. Book Review

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