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Genes, Brain and Behavior

Cover image for Vol. 13 Issue 6

July 2014

Volume 13, Issue 6

Pages i–iii, 519–577

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Articles
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      Issue Information (pages i–iii)

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/gbb.12077

  2. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Hidden in plain sight: spike-wave discharges in mouse inbred strains (pages 519–526)

      V. A. Letts, B. J. Beyer and W. N. Frankel

      Version of Record online: 16 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/gbb.12142

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      8 out of 27 inbred strains had reproducible, frequent spike-wave discharges, including 5 previously undiagnosed strains.

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      Sex chromosome complement influences operant responding for a palatable food in mice (pages 527–534)

      E. Seu, S. M. Groman, A. P. Arnold and J. D. Jentsch

      Version of Record online: 16 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/gbb.12143

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      Sex chromosome complement influences motivation and reward sensitivity in mice

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      Association of the KCNJ5 gene with Tourette Syndrome and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (pages 535–542)

      L. Gomez, K. Wigg, K. Zhang, L. Lopez, P. Sandor, M. Malone and C. L. Barr

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/gbb.12141

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      Linkage and association of Tourette Syndrome (TS) and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has previously been reported for chromosome 11q24. We tested for association of the KCNJ5 gene in TS and ADHD and observed biased transmission of haplotypes from parents to probands for both disorders. We screened the gene and promoter and did not identify variants that could explain the association. We also tested for co-expression of KCNJ5 and a small intronic antisense transcript in brain tissues and found that the antisense transcript and the short KCNJ5 isoform are co-expressed in three brain regions indicating that this transcript may regulate KCNJ5 expression.

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      The interactive effect of MAOA-LPR genotype and childhood physical neglect on aggressive behaviors in Italian male prisoners (pages 543–549)

      E. Gorodetsky, L. Bevilacqua, V. Carli, M. Sarchiapone, A. Roy, D. Goldman and M.-A. Enoch

      Version of Record online: 31 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/gbb.12140

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      We investigated the interactive effect of MAOA-LPR genotype high (H) and low (L) activity variant and a history of childhood trauma in predicting aggressive behaviors in a prisoner population. About 692 male prisoners were genotyped for MAOA-LPR and evaluate for aggression (BGHA), and childhood trauma (CTQ). MAOA-LPR interacted with CTQ physical neglect (PN) to predict aggression. Within the group not exposed to PN, carriers of the MAOA-LPR-H were more aggressive. We observed a crossover effect in that the increase in aggression scores with PN was greater in MAOA-L than in MAOA-H activity individuals. These findings suggest that childhood trauma and the functional MAOA-LPR polymorphism may interact to specifically increase the risk of over aggressive behavior.

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      Enkephalin knockout male mice are resistant to chronic mild stress (pages 550–558)

      I. Melo, E. Drews, A. Zimmer and A. Bilkei-Gorzo

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/gbb.12139

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      PENK KO mice are resilent to chronic mild stress: CMS elicited anhedonia and despair-like behaviour in wild-type but not in PENK KO mice.

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      A variant in ANKK1 modulates acute subjective effects of cocaine: a preliminary study (pages 559–564)

      C. J. Spellicy, M. J. Harding, S. C. Hamon, J. J. Mahoney III, J. A. Reyes, T. R. Kosten, T. F. Newton, R. De La Garza II and D. A. Nielsen

      Version of Record online: 17 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/gbb.12121

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      This preliminary study found that a variant in the ANKK1 gene may modulate subjective response to cocaine administration in the laboratory. Specifically, individuals with a T allele of ANKK1 rs1800497 experienced greater subjective ‘high’, ‘any drug effect’ and ‘like’ after cocaine administration than the other genotype group did. Therefore, a participant's ANKK1 genotype may identify individuals who are likely to experience greater positive subjective effects following cocaine exposure, and these individuals may have increased vulnerability to continue using cocaine or they may be at greater risk to relapse during periods of abstinence.

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      Laboratory evolution of adenylyl cyclase independent learning in Drosophila and missing heritability (pages 565–577)

      M. Cressy, D. Valente, A. Altick, E. Kockenmeister, K. Honegger, H. Qin, P. P. Mitra and J. Dubnau

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/gbb.12146

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      Missing heritability is prevalent in a laboratory selection with just 23 segregating loci and full genotyping.

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