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geb12158-sup-0001-as1.pdf1066K

Appendix S1 Diversity–area relationship model list.

geb12158-sup-0002-as2.pdf466K

Appendix S2 Proof of rank invariance after standardization.

geb12158-sup-0003-as3.pdf156K

Appendix S3 Variance explained by the diversity–area relationships.

geb12158-sup-0004-as4.pdf875K

Appendix S4 Species–area relationship, phylogenetic diversity–area relationship and functional diversity-area relationship model selection patterns.

geb12158-sup-0005-as5.pdf664K

Appendix S5 Analysing model shape by plotting differences in diversity–area relationships.

geb12158-sup-0006-as6.pdf24092K

Appendix S6 Maps of taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional mammal hotspots.

geb12158-sup-0007-as7.pdf83K

Appendix S7 Correlation of ranks between facets.

geb12158-sup-0008-as8.pdf629K

Appendix S8 Relationships between the threshold used to define hotspots and the congruence between hotspots.

geb12158-sup-0009-as9.pdf466K

Appendix S9 Robustness of the hotspots lists to choice of diversity–area relationship model.

geb12158-sup-0010-as10.pdf355K

Appendix S10 Congruence between functional diversity hotspots defined with different sets of functional traits.

geb12158-sup-0011-as11.pdf390K

Appendix S11 Importance of diversity–area relationship construction for defining multifaceted hotspots.

geb12158-sup-0012-as12.pdf274K

Appendix S12 Comparing model averaging and the power model alone to define hotpots.

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