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Abstract

Geographical studies of international aid have been scarce. In this article we make the case for geographies of aid, arguing not only that aid would be better understood if a geographical lens were applied, but also that many of the core questions and concepts that concern geographers could be approached and better understood through research on the geographies of aid. We consider that while the global politics of aid is well understood the way local, national and regional scale geographies interact with this is not. Ultimately, we posit that a geographical approach – pursued through a focus on scale, place, networks and space – would allow us to construct a new political agenda for aid that unites critical geographical concerns across the globe.