Chemical composition and in vitro total gas and methane production of forage species from the Mid Rift Valley grasslands of Ethiopia

Authors

  • M. Bezabih,

    Corresponding author
    1. Animal Nutrition Group, Department of Animal Sciences, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands
    2. Department of Animal and Range Sciences, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia
    • Correspondence to: M. Bezabih, Animal Nutrition Group, Department of Animal Sciences, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 338, 6700 AH Wageningen, The Netherlands.

      E-mail: derseh7@yahoo.com

    Search for more papers by this author
  • W. F. Pellikaan,

    1. Animal Nutrition Group, Department of Animal Sciences, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author
  • A. Tolera,

    1. Department of Animal and Range Sciences, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • N. A. Khan,

    1. Animal Nutrition Group, Department of Animal Sciences, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author
  • W. H. Hendriks

    1. Animal Nutrition Group, Department of Animal Sciences, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands
    2. Animal Nutrition Division, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

There is increasing interest in sustainable land use in the tropics to optimize animal production while also reducing methane (CH4) emissions, but information on nutritive value and CH4-emission potential of tropical forage species is limited. Samples of 24 grasses and five other forages were collected during the main rainy season on randomly positioned quadrats in semi-arid grassland in the Mid Rift Valley of Ethiopia. Samples were pooled by species, analysed for chemical composition and incubated with rumen fluid to determine total gas and CH4-emission potentials using a fully automated in vitro gas production apparatus. Organic matter digestibility (OMD) and metabolizable energy (ME) contents were calculated from chemical composition and gas production data. Large variability was observed among forages for all nutritional variables considered. The grasses Eleusine multiflora, Pennisetum stramineum, Dactyloctenium aegyptium, Eragrostis aspera, Cenchrus ciliaris and Eragrostis cilianensis showed relatively high OMD (68–72%) and ME values (9·1–10·2 MJ kg−1 dry matter). Melinis repens, E. multiflora and the non-legume forb Zaleya pentandra showed relatively low CH4 to total gas ratios; these species may have potential for use in low CH4-emission forage diets. Acacia tortilis fruits had high content of crude protein and moderate ME values, and may be an ideal feed supplement for the grazing ruminant. Sodium content was below the recommended level for ruminants in all the forage species. Overall, the pasture stand during the main growing season was evaluated as having moderate nutritional quality.

Ancillary