Using two different algorithms to determine the prevalence of sarcopenia

Authors

  • Daisuke Yoshida,

    Corresponding author
    1. Section for Health Promotion, Department for Research and Development to Support Independent Life of Elderly, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan
    2. Japan Foundation for Aging and Health, Aichi, Japan
    • Correspondence: Dr Daisuke Yoshida PhD, Section for Health Promotion, Department for Research and Development to Support Independent Life of Elderly, Center for Gerontology and Social Science, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, 35 Gengo, Morioka-machi, Obu, Aichi 474-8511, Japan. Email: yoshida@ncgg.go.jp

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  • Takao Suzuki,

    1. Research Institute, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan
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  • Hiroyuki Shimada,

    1. Section for Health Promotion, Department for Research and Development to Support Independent Life of Elderly, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan
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  • Hyuntae Park,

    1. Section for Physical Functioning Activation, Department of Functioning Activation, Center for Gerontology and Social Science, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan
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  • Hyuma Makizako,

    1. Section for Health Promotion, Department for Research and Development to Support Independent Life of Elderly, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan
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  • Takehiko Doi,

    1. Section for Health Promotion, Department for Research and Development to Support Independent Life of Elderly, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan
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  • Yuya Anan,

    1. Section for Health Promotion, Department for Research and Development to Support Independent Life of Elderly, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan
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  • Kota Tsutsumimoto,

    1. Section for Health Promotion, Department for Research and Development to Support Independent Life of Elderly, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan
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  • Kazuki Uemura,

    1. Section for Health Promotion, Department for Research and Development to Support Independent Life of Elderly, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan
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  • Tadashi Ito,

    1. Section for Health Promotion, Department for Research and Development to Support Independent Life of Elderly, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan
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  • Sangyoon Lee

    1. Section for Physical Functioning Activation, Department of Functioning Activation, Center for Gerontology and Social Science, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi, Japan
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Abstract

Aim

Several operative definitions and screening methods for sarcopenia have been proposed in previous studies; however, the opinions of researchers still differ. We compared the prevalence of sarcopenia using two different algorithms: (i) the European working group on sarcopenia in older people (EWGSOP)-suggested algorithm using gait speed as the first step; and (ii) the muscle mass and strength algorithm.

Methods

A population-based, cross-sectional survey of adults aged over 65 years was carried out. Data on a total of 4811 participants were available for analysis. Gait speed, grip strength and appendicular skeletal muscle mass were assessed to determine sarcopenia. Appendicular skeletal muscle mass was estimated from bioimpedance analysis measurements and expressed as skeletal muscle mass index. Grip strength and skeletal muscle mass index were considered to be low if they fell below the threshold of the lowest 20% of values measured in a subset of healthy subjects. We compared the prevalence rates of sarcopenia determined by the two algorithms.

Results

The prevalence rate of sarcopenia in a representative sample of older Japanese adults was 8.2% for men and 6.8% for women based on the EWGSOP algorithm. The two algorithms identified the same participants as sarcopenic, the only difference being the EWGSOP algorithm classified an additional seven participants (0.15%) into sarcopenia compared with the muscle mass and strength algorithm.

Conclusion

It is debatable whether inclusion of gait speed is necessary when screening for sarcopenia in community-dwelling older adults. Future research should examine the necessity of including gait speed in algorithms and the validity of cut-off values. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2014; 14 (Suppl. 1): 46–51.

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