Global Policy

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 1

February 2013

Volume 4, Issue 1

Pages 1–127

  1. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Special Section - Contemporary Maritime Piracy: responding to a Wicked Problem, edited by Christian Bueger
    4. Survey Article
    5. Special Section - Export Credit Availability and Global Trade, edited by Andreas Klasen
    6. Practitioner’s Commentary
    7. Response to Article
    8. Review Essay
    1. Global Health and the New Bottom Billion: What do Shifts in Global Poverty and Disease Burden Mean for Donor Agencies? (pages 1–14)

      Amanda Glassman, Denizhan Duran and Andy Sumner

      Article first published online: 8 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1758-5899.2012.00176.x

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      ‘In 1990, 93 per cent of the world’s poor lived in low income countries (LICs). Now, more than 70 per cent – up to a billion of the world’s poorest people or a ‘new bottom billion’– live in middle income countries, and most of them in stable, non fragile middle income countries.’ The authors of this article examine how the distribution of global poverty and disease has changed, arguing that global health agencies will need to adjust their outlook to remain effective, looking at their approaches to eligibility, partnerships and staffing.

    2. Existential Risk Prevention as Global Priority (pages 15–31)

      Nick Bostrom

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12002

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      In this article Nick Bostrom claims that issues surrounding human-extinction risks and related hazards remain poorly understood. He clarifies the concept of existential risk and develops an improved classification scheme, showing how the notion of existential risk suggests a new way of thinking about the ideal of sustainability.

    3. Climate Disruption: Are We Beyond the Worst Case Scenario? (pages 32–42)

      Michael Jennings

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1758-5899.2012.00193.x

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      Are we are living at or beyond the worst case scenario for greenhouse gas emissions projected by the IPCC in 2007? The author maintains we are and exhorts policy makers to acknowledge and work with the conditions projected by the A1FI scenario. It is time to focus all out on strategies for adapting to a largely different and probably more difficult future.

    4. Debating the International Legitimacy of the G20: Global Policymaking and Contemporary International Society (pages 43–52)

      Steven Slaughter

      Article first published online: 8 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1758-5899.2012.00175.x

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      While the G20 is going to be an important forum for timely agenda setting and decision making at an executive level which also draws all states into a common framework of rules for global capitalism, this article also argues that the existence of selective forums such as the G20 raises a range of challenges in attempting to develop and sustain legitimacy.

    5. Harmony with Diversity: China’s Preferred World Order and Weakening Western Influence in the Developing World (pages 53–62)

      Frans-Paul van der Putten

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1758-5899.2012.00196.x

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      Frans van der Putten looks ahead to a China that will be more influential at the multilateral level, and is likely to promote political-economic diversity as a major norm in international relations. This will pose serious limits to the ability of the West to promote liberal democracy and economic liberalism through multilateral institutions.

  2. Special Section - Contemporary Maritime Piracy: responding to a Wicked Problem, edited by Christian Bueger

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Special Section - Contemporary Maritime Piracy: responding to a Wicked Problem, edited by Christian Bueger
    4. Survey Article
    5. Special Section - Export Credit Availability and Global Trade, edited by Andreas Klasen
    6. Practitioner’s Commentary
    7. Response to Article
    8. Review Essay
    1. The Global Fight against Piracy (pages 63–64)

      Christian Bueger

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12028

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      Christian Bueger, guest editor of this special section, introduces the many challenges faced by the international community in the face of maritime piracy. He outlines the contributions of the authors to this special section, which document that much of the current efforts move in the right direction and concludes that there is ‘some justifiable hope that large-scale piracy will be contained to a reasonable degree’.

    2. Contemporary Maritime Piracy: Five Obstacles to Ending Somali Piracy (pages 65–72)

      Sarah Percy and Anja Shortland

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12043

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      ‘This article argues that five main obstacles stand in the way of effective control of Somali piracy: lack of alternate employment; local corruption; the nature of the victims of piracy; the practices of some shipping companies and insurers; and the fact that enforcement efforts push pirates to innovate, which in turn worsens the problem.’Sarah Percy considers the time for dealing with the root causes of piracy has long since passed. Instead we must now consider how to overcome these specific obstacles.

    3. Prosecuting Pirates: The Contact Group on Piracy off the Coast of Somalia, Governance and International Law (pages 73–79)

      Douglas Guilfoyle

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1758-5899.2012.00190.x

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      This article examines the criticisms levelled at the international community for the low rate of piracy prosecutions, the lack of centralised solutions, and the failure to create an international piracy court. Douglas Guilfoyle explores the role of the Contact Group on Piracy off the Coast of Somalia’s Working Group as a tool for bringing prosecutions against those involved in piracy.

    4. The European Union at the Horn of Africa: The Contribution of Critical Geopolitics to Piracy Studies (pages 80–85)

      Basil Germond

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1758-5899.2012.00191.x

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      ‘Critical geopolitics highlights the construction of threats, space and identities’. In the context of piracy studies, Basil Germond explores how geopolitics plays a role in the EU’s response to piracy at the Horn of Africa. He questions the benign image the Union often seeks to portray, highlighting the role of power politics behind the global governance principles it articulates in this field.

    5. Orchestrating the Response: Somali Piracy and Ontological Complexity (pages 86–93)

      Christian Bueger

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1758-5899.2012.00194.x

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      Why is piracy actually considered to be problematic? This is the question Christian Bueger seeks to answer to understand the nature of ontological complexity in the case of piracy. He presents the various paradigms different answers to this question can lead to, each with their own pre-assumptions, conclusions and policy recommendations. These paradigms are often in tension with one another and this article seeks to find a way to navigate through these tensions.

    6. The Moral Economy of Somali Piracy – Organised Criminal Business or Subsistence Activity? (pages 94–100)

      Axel Klein

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1758-5899.2012.00192.x

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      Axel Klein argues that piracy should not be compared to organized crime. Instead, he uses the concept of ‘moral economy’ to explain how piracy activities are legitimized. In taking this approach, solutions should focus on regenerating coastline livelihoods rather than turning to the criminal justice system and security sector.

  3. Survey Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Special Section - Contemporary Maritime Piracy: responding to a Wicked Problem, edited by Christian Bueger
    4. Survey Article
    5. Special Section - Export Credit Availability and Global Trade, edited by Andreas Klasen
    6. Practitioner’s Commentary
    7. Response to Article
    8. Review Essay
    1. The Challenges of Nanotechnology Policy Making PART 2. Discussing Voluntary Frameworks and Options (pages 101–107)

      Claire A. Auplat

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1758-5899.2011.00160.x

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      In the second instalment of Claire Auplat’s discussion of nanogovernance, she surveys a range of coexisting frameworks and the way stakeholders use them in constructing nano policy. Two major directions for the future of nano policy making are outlined, and this article debates the merits of each.

  4. Special Section - Export Credit Availability and Global Trade, edited by Andreas Klasen

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Special Section - Contemporary Maritime Piracy: responding to a Wicked Problem, edited by Christian Bueger
    4. Survey Article
    5. Special Section - Export Credit Availability and Global Trade, edited by Andreas Klasen
    6. Practitioner’s Commentary
    7. Response to Article
    8. Review Essay
    1. Export Credit Availability and Global Trade (pages 108–109)

      Andreas Klasen

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12025

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      ‘Export Credit Agencies play a crucial role in the promotion of exports in both highly industrialised and developing economies.’ Andreas Klasen, guest editor of this special section and Head of Economics and Policy at PricewaterhouseCoopers, discusses the role of ECAs in global trade and in particular how ECAs have strengthened economy recovery since the 2008-9 recession.

    2. Why Exporters Need Export Credit (pages 110–111)

      Jon Coleman

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12024

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      Jon Coleman, Chairman of the British Exporters Association, discusses the importance of credit insurance to export trade. It acts as an ‘enabler’ of trade and mitigates against some of the risks companies must take to trade across borders.

    3. The Role of Export Credit Agencies in a Fast-growing BRIC Economy (pages 112–113)

      Geetha Muralidhar

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12023

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      ‘The role of ECAs is indispensable in fostering export growth across nations.’ Geetha Muralidhar examines the impact of export credit agencies in facilitating growth and export trade in the fast-growing BRIC economies, focusing on their role in India specifically.

    4. Export Credit Availability and the Euro Debt Crisis (pages 114–115)

      Peter Luketa

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12022

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      Peter Luketa, Global Head of Export Credit and Global Specialized Finance at HSBC, discusses the importance of the ECA product in overcoming the Euro Debt Crisis.

    5. Export Financing in Brazil: Challenges and Opportunities (pages 116–117)

      Pedro Carriço

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12021

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      Pedro Carrico, head of Country Risk and International Relations at SBCE, argues that it is the role of export credit agencies, like SBCE, to ‘assist export growth in a more competitive world’.

  5. Practitioner’s Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Special Section - Contemporary Maritime Piracy: responding to a Wicked Problem, edited by Christian Bueger
    4. Survey Article
    5. Special Section - Export Credit Availability and Global Trade, edited by Andreas Klasen
    6. Practitioner’s Commentary
    7. Response to Article
    8. Review Essay
    1. Controlling Munitions Stockpiles: How to Stop the Inadvertent Arming of Insurgencies (pages 118–121)

      Geoffrey D. Stevens

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1758-5899.2012.00189.x

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      ‘Failure to quickly control large weapons stockpiles in Afghanistan and Iraq have been costly’, acknowledges Geoffrey D. Stevens, a Colonel in the US army. He suggests a four-part solution: reduce the size of stockpiles; secure remaining stockpiles; recover munitions lost in situations with inadequate security; and dispose of recovered and abandoned stockpiles.

  6. Response to Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Special Section - Contemporary Maritime Piracy: responding to a Wicked Problem, edited by Christian Bueger
    4. Survey Article
    5. Special Section - Export Credit Availability and Global Trade, edited by Andreas Klasen
    6. Practitioner’s Commentary
    7. Response to Article
    8. Review Essay
    1. ‘Information Aid’ and the Dissemination of Innovation (pages 122–124)

      Djims Milius

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1758-5899.2012.00178.x

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      Djims Milius responds to the article ‘Intellectual Property, Dissemination of Innovation and Sustainable Development’ by Claude Henry and Joseph Stiglitz, published by Global Policy in 2010. Milius emphasises the international legislative reforms proposed by the original paper to clarify the terms of intellectual property. But he remains dissatisfied with the authors’ approach to dissemination and recommends a policy of ‘information aid’ as a remedial tool for this purpose.

  7. Review Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Special Section - Contemporary Maritime Piracy: responding to a Wicked Problem, edited by Christian Bueger
    4. Survey Article
    5. Special Section - Export Credit Availability and Global Trade, edited by Andreas Klasen
    6. Practitioner’s Commentary
    7. Response to Article
    8. Review Essay
    1. The Rule of Law Abroad: Learning from Experience and Listening to Locals (pages 125–127)

      Thomas Kirk

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12031

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      Thomas Kirk explores the role of the rule of law abroad in this sweeping review essay. Dealing with the works of Carothers, Armytage, Isser and Kleinfeld, Kirk examines the critiques offered to the traditional rule of law approaches. He concludes that practitioners increasingly have fewer excuses to limit reform programmes to a traditional, narrow focus on formal institutions, the judiciary and lawyers.

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