Global Policy

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 2

May 2013

Volume 4, Issue 2

Pages 129–222

  1. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Special Section - Global Companies and Emerging Market Economies Edited by John Mikler
    4. Special Section - Global Companies and Emerging Market Economies Edited by John Mikler
    5. Special Section - Global Companies and Emerging Market Economies Edited by John Mikler
    6. Special Section - Globalising Justice: A Multidimensional Approach Edited by Valentina Gentile and Marcello di Paola
    7. Practitioner Commentaries
    1. The G20 and Food Security: a Mismatch in Global Governance? (pages 129–138)

      Jennifer Clapp and Sophia Murphy

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12039

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      When the G20 took up food security in 2010, many were optimistic that it could bring about positive change by addressing structural problems in commodity markets that were contributing to high and volatile food prices and exacerbating hunger. Its members could tighten the regulation of agricultural commodity futures markets, support multilateral trade rules that would better reflect both importer and exporter needs, end renewable fuel targets that diverted land to biofuels production, and coordinate food reserves.

    2. Forum Shopping in Global Governance: Understanding States, Business and NGOs in Multiple Arenas (pages 139–149)

      Hannah Murphy and Aynsley Kellow

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1758-5899.2012.00195.x

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      Forum shopping involves actors seeking to realise their policy objectives within preferred policy arenas on the basis of an arena's particular governing characteristics. We examine the forum shopping behaviour of the key states, business and non-governmental groups in regard to three policy issues: labour standards, intellectual property rights, and chemicals regulation.

    3. Social Investment According to the OECD/DELSA: A Discourse in the Making (pages 150–159)

      Rianne Mahon

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1758-5899.2012.00182.x

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      While the idea of Social Investment may have opened anew a positive role for social policy, it is insufficient for such policies to focus narrowly on improving the human capital of the poor. Rather it is important to develop the human capital of all.

  2. Special Section - Global Companies and Emerging Market Economies Edited by John Mikler

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Special Section - Global Companies and Emerging Market Economies Edited by John Mikler
    4. Special Section - Global Companies and Emerging Market Economies Edited by John Mikler
    5. Special Section - Global Companies and Emerging Market Economies Edited by John Mikler
    6. Special Section - Globalising Justice: A Multidimensional Approach Edited by Valentina Gentile and Marcello di Paola
    7. Practitioner Commentaries
    1. Global Companies and Emerging Market Economies (pages 160–161)

      John MiklerUniversity of Sydney

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12050

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      John Mikler introduces this special section on Global Companies and Emerging Market Economies. Drawing together experts in the field, these articles examine the institutional context of state-corporate relations in the modern world. Given that ‘global companies are central actors in global policy and governance, and therefore central to conceptualizing the economic, social and political transformations in world affairs that are encapsulated in the term ‘globalization’, the contributors show how this is important for understanding the way in which 'states and their corporations are emerging, and will continue to emerge, together'.

    2. The Political Economy of Global Business: the Case of the BRICs (pages 162–172)

      Andrea Goldstein

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12062

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      ‘Gaining greater knowledge of the characteristics of large firms that dominate the global economy is inherently an important endeavour.’ In this article, Andrea Goldstein examines the emerging BRIC countries’ position in the global economy, their similarities and differences in dealing with business, and the implications this has for the rest of the world.

    3. Varieties of the Regulatory State and Global Companies: the Case of China (pages 173–183)

      Shiufai Wong

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12051

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      ‘China is emerging as a market economy institutionally, as well as economically and politically.’ In this article, Shiufai Wong examines the role of global companies in the evolution of China's institutional structure, the role of the regulatory state in this evolution and how China deviates from the traditional regulatory state model described in the literature.

    4. The Rise of East Asia's Global Companies (pages 184–193)

      Sung-Young Kim

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12052

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      ‘The impressive economic transformation of states throughout East Asia over the past fifty years cannot be explained without understanding the role and relationship between governments and firms.’ In this article, Sung-Young Kim examines the case of Korea and the ways in which the state effectively supports global companies to globalize Korean technologies.

  3. Special Section - Globalising Justice: A Multidimensional Approach Edited by Valentina Gentile and Marcello di Paola

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Special Section - Global Companies and Emerging Market Economies Edited by John Mikler
    4. Special Section - Global Companies and Emerging Market Economies Edited by John Mikler
    5. Special Section - Global Companies and Emerging Market Economies Edited by John Mikler
    6. Special Section - Globalising Justice: A Multidimensional Approach Edited by Valentina Gentile and Marcello di Paola
    7. Practitioner Commentaries
    1. Debating Global Justice: an Introduction (pages 194–195)

      Sebastiano Maffettone

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12036

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      From the conceptual point of view, the notion of global justice coincides primarily with the notion of fair consideration of interests and equal treatment of people the world over. From the historical point of view, the priority of distributive justice at a global level is explained by the struggle between capitalism and communism that characterized international political theory and practice during the second part of 20th century.

    2. Globalising Justice: a Multidimensional Approach. 1. Economics (pages 196–197)

      Marcello Di Paola and Valentina Gentile

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12035

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      In the last two decades, the academic debate on justice has undergone an important change: its scope of application has enlarged; from the national to the global.

    3. Global Income Inequality in Numbers: in History and Now (pages 198–208)

      Branko Milanovic

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12032

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      Development is about people: either poor people have ways to become richer where they are now, or they can become rich by moving somewhere else. Looked at from above, there is no real difference between the two options. But from the point of view of real politics, there is a whole world of difference.

    4. Milanovic on Global Inequality and Poverty (pages 209–210)

      Michele Bocchiola

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12034

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      At the global level, the idea of moving goods and resources away from rich states towards poorer societies might seem appealing. But, one might ask, is this the solution to the problem of inequality in the world?

    5. On Milanovic's Idea of World Inequality (pages 211–212)

      Pietro Reichlin

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12033

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      A common perception is that the world is experiencing a period of growing inequality since the intensification of the globalisation process, labour migration and rising competition from emerging countries. Is this perception real?

  4. Practitioner Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Special Section - Global Companies and Emerging Market Economies Edited by John Mikler
    4. Special Section - Global Companies and Emerging Market Economies Edited by John Mikler
    5. Special Section - Global Companies and Emerging Market Economies Edited by John Mikler
    6. Special Section - Globalising Justice: A Multidimensional Approach Edited by Valentina Gentile and Marcello di Paola
    7. Practitioner Commentaries
    1. Future Warfare: Men and Machines at War (pages 213–215)

      Rahul Bhonsle

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12029

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      Nation states and non-state entities that can draw upon the past and adapt to the future in terms of the overall environment for warfare – including the human, political, social and technological – are more likely to succeed in attaining their aims and objectives and retain a unique identity in the global order of tomorrow.

    2. Sustainable Infrastructure Fund: Attracting Institutional Investment to Drive Sustainable Development (pages 216–219)

      André Schneider and Daniel Wiener

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12042

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      How does one acquire the massive financial investment needed for a fundamental re-configuration of the core infrastructure to confront the challenges posed by climate change mitigation and adaptation and by resource scarcity and energy security? Andŕ Schneider and Daniel Wiener, CEOs of Global Energy Basel, outline their plans for the creation of a private debt fund in order for institutional investors to able to invest in graded sustainable infrastructure, bringing together private investors, development banks and other interested parties.

    3. ‘Walking the Walk’: a Snapshot of Germany's Energiewende (pages 220–222)

      Dr Norbert Röttgen

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12026

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      The key to a successful Energiewende will be to find the ‘right’ balance between technological feasibility, economic common sense and legitimate public participation.

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