Global Policy

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 4

November 2013

Volume 4, Issue 4

Pages 325–451

  1. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Special Section - International Animal Protection, edited by Alasdair Cochrane
    4. Special Section - Globalising Justice: A Multidimensional Approach, edited by Valentina Gentile
    5. Survey Articles
    6. Practitioner Commentaries
    7. Review Essay
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      Trojan Multilateralism: Global Cooperation in Health (pages 325–335)

      Devi Sridhar and Ngaire Woods

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12066

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      In this article, Ngaire Woods and Devi Sridhar examine the implications of two major recent trends in global health: an increase in vertical funding to specific diseases which has coincided with an increase in funding to international organisations. They observe, however, that this increase in funding has not lead to increased multilateralism in the interests of long term global health objectives. ‘The positive lessons to be drawn from vertical initiatives need to be balanced by the risks posed from a convergence of vertical initiatives and Trojan multilateralism.’

    2. Identity and War (pages 336–346)

      Mary Kaldor

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12084

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      War should be interpreted less as an external contest of will between two sides but rather as a one-sided and/or parallel effort to construct uni-dimensional political identities as a basis for power. Power derived from identity so constructed is likely to be authoritarian and repressive.

    3. Keeping the Arctic ‘Cold’: The Rise of Plurilateral Diplomacy? (pages 347–358)

      Corneliu Bjola

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12075

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      At the time when the Arctic region faces significant climatic transformations, a triple governance gap threatens to fuel major diplomatic tensions among regional actors over natural resources, navigation rights, and fishery management.

    4. Islamic Feminism: Roots, Development and Policies (pages 359–368)

      Zaid Eyadat

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12057

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      ‘This paper explores the emergence and impact of Islamic feminism in the Arab world.’ In this paper, Zait Eyadat explores the diverse categories of Islamic feminism, how they are similar and different from the Western traditions, and the role of Islamic feminism in the shaping of politics and culture in the Islamic world, especially the Arab Spring.

  2. Special Section - International Animal Protection, edited by Alasdair Cochrane

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Special Section - International Animal Protection, edited by Alasdair Cochrane
    4. Special Section - Globalising Justice: A Multidimensional Approach, edited by Valentina Gentile
    5. Survey Articles
    6. Practitioner Commentaries
    7. Review Essay
    1. International Animal Protection: An Introduction (pages 369–370)

      Alasdair Cochrane

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12082

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      For if the conviction that animals have some independent value of their own is sound, as surely it must be, then it is absolutely vital that we deliberate carefully upon the types of international policies that are necessary to make that conviction meaningful for animals themselves.

    2. Expanding Global Justice: The Case for the International Protection of Animals (pages 371–380)

      Oscar Horta

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12085

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      This paper examines and rejects the view that nonhuman animals cannot be recipients of justice, and argues that the main reasons in favor of universal human rights and global justice also apply in the case of the international protection of the interests of nonhuman animals.

    3. Wild Animal Welfare in International Law: The Present Position and the Scope for Development (pages 381–390)

      Stuart R. Harrop

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12086

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      This article recommends a way in which international policy may overcome the challenges of polarised debate and the gulf between moral relativism and moral universalism to develop the foundations of a comprehensive welfare regime at the international level.

    4. Into the Void: International Law and the Protection of Animal Welfare (pages 391–398)

      Steven White

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12076

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      Emerging frameworks which might fill the gap in global animal welfare protection include a Universal Declaration on Animal Welfare, the entrenchment of World Animal Health Organisation (OIE) animal health standards and an International Convention for the Protection of Animal Welfare. While the prospects of any of these models succeeding in the short term are uncertain at best, the challenge now is to be thinking carefully about what legal form an international framework for animal protection might take.

  3. Special Section - Globalising Justice: A Multidimensional Approach, edited by Valentina Gentile

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Special Section - International Animal Protection, edited by Alasdair Cochrane
    4. Special Section - Globalising Justice: A Multidimensional Approach, edited by Valentina Gentile
    5. Survey Articles
    6. Practitioner Commentaries
    7. Review Essay
    1. Global Justice as Recognition: Dealing with Diversity in a Pluralised World (pages 399–400)

      Valentina Gentile

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12090

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      Global institutions, including human rights standards, should acknowledge and incorporate the tension existing between universalism and moral or cultural relativism.

    2. Human Rights, Universality and Sovereignty: The Irrelevance and Relevance of Sharia (pages 401–408)

      Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12088

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      Muslims must continue to exercise their freedom to freely think, study, debate with others, and decide for themselves, even under the most oppressive conditions. Here is the fusion of the ends and means of human rights in the act of exercising our rights.

    3. ‘Ijtihad’ and ‘Relevance of Sharia’ to Contextualize Universal Human Rights Discourse (pages 409–410)

      Francesca M. Corrao

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12094

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      In spite of this promising theoretical background, the acceptance and implementation of the human rights regime in Islamic societies is still controversial. One major issue in the conceptualization as well as in the practice of human rights in Islamic countries is surely related to the tension between the alleged universal validity of these standards and the limits of internal state sovereignty.

    4. Sharia and Human Rights: Hemeneutics and the Risks of State-centrism (pages 411–412)

      Domenico Melidoro

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12087

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      Written texts, and Islamic scriptures are no exception, can be read in almost infinite ways if, beyond the context, there are no moral and political principles guiding and constraining the interpretation. An-Na'im adds that ‘the proponents of each interpretation will seek to win the support of the community through the use of what they believe to be Islamic concepts and arguments that are most convincing in the community they seek to transform’.

    5. Overcoming the Epistemic Injustice of Colonialism (pages 413–417)

      Rajeev Bhargava

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12093

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      A deep problem today for the sufferers of epistemic injustice is that Western categories have both an undeniable universal potential and that they are fully intermingled with the specificity of Western practices, and worse, possess a deep imprint of Western domination and hegemony.

    6. Deparochializing the Global Justice Debate, Starting with Indian Political Theory (pages 418–419)

      Aakash Singh

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12092

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      In political theory, which posits normative principles or frameworks with ostensibly universal application, a comparativist orientation is emerging, which looks beyond mainstream categories of the discipline to find conceptualizations more apt to reflect the social or political practices and experiences of minorities.

    7. The Great Global Poverty Debate: Is Something Missing? (pages 420–424)

      Neera Chandhoke

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12091

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      Unless the right not to be poor is located in a strong version of equality as a good which has intrinsic value, as well as a good that enables access to other goods such as the ability to equally profit from structures of opportunity, the right not to be poor might prove no more compelling than other pious wishes for the human condition, which remain on the lips of philosophers, activists or policy makers.

    8. ‘Epistemic Injustice’ and the ‘Right Not to Be Poor’: Bringing Recognition into the Debate on Global Justice (pages 425–427)

      Valentina Gentile

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12089

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      Poverty and inequality are not the sole sources of (global) injustices. And the latter are not only a matter of fair distribution. Identity and cultural asymmetries, often articulated along political and economic lines, relocate and reshape the struggle against subordination to include new areas of contestation, such as gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, culture, religion and nationality.

  4. Survey Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Special Section - International Animal Protection, edited by Alasdair Cochrane
    4. Special Section - Globalising Justice: A Multidimensional Approach, edited by Valentina Gentile
    5. Survey Articles
    6. Practitioner Commentaries
    7. Review Essay
    1. BRICS and the Privileging of Informality in Global Governance (pages 428–433)

      Andrew F. Cooper and Asif B. Farooq

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12077

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      Within the G20 the BRICS have played a “wait and see” or “hedging” game. They have moved into the ‘premier’ forum of economic governance without pre-conditions or material quid pro quos.

    2. Soil Security: Solving the Global Soil Crisis (pages 434–441)

      Andrea Koch, Alex McBratney, Mark Adams, Damien Field, Robert Hill, John Crawford, Budiman Minasny, Rattan Lal, Lynette Abbott, Anthony O'Donnell, Denis Angers, Jeffrey Baldock, Edward Barbier, Dan Binkley, William Parton, Diana H. Wall, Michael Bird, Johan Bouma, Claire Chenu, Cornelia Butler Flora, Keith Goulding, Sabine Grunwald, Jon Hempel, Julie Jastrow, Johannes Lehmann, Klaus Lorenz, Cristine L. Morgan, Charles W. Rice, David Whitehead, Iain Young and Michael Zimmermann

      Article first published online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12096

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      Soil degradation is a critical and growing global problem. As the world population increases, pressure on soil also increases and the natural capital of soil faces continuing decline.

  5. Practitioner Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Special Section - International Animal Protection, edited by Alasdair Cochrane
    4. Special Section - Globalising Justice: A Multidimensional Approach, edited by Valentina Gentile
    5. Survey Articles
    6. Practitioner Commentaries
    7. Review Essay
    1. Towards a Balanced and Sustainable Global Health Innovation and Access Policy (pages 442–444)

      Lenias Hwenda

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12040

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      Policy practices that encourage LMICs dependency on health-development aid, besides humanitarian aid, also stifle their voice in policy decision-making.

    2. The Renewed Hope of Multilateralism in South Asia: Applying the MFN Principle to Pakistan–India Trade (pages 445–448)

      Sasidaran Gopalan, Ammar A. Malik and Kenneth A. Reinert

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12080

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      The multilateral trading principle of nondiscrimination and the WTO commitment of most-favoured nation (MFN) treatment have been missing in the Pakistan-India trading relationship. This practitioner commentary addresses recent moves toward multilateral principles between these two countries, namely Pakistan's decision to grant MFN status to India.

  6. Review Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Special Section - International Animal Protection, edited by Alasdair Cochrane
    4. Special Section - Globalising Justice: A Multidimensional Approach, edited by Valentina Gentile
    5. Survey Articles
    6. Practitioner Commentaries
    7. Review Essay
    1. Digging Deeper: the Politics of ‘Conflict Minerals’ in the Eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (pages 449–451)

      Jeroen Cuvelier, Jose Diemel and Koen Vlassenroot

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12079

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      But the dominant understanding of the reasons behind Congo's war is not without critique. Different experts have raised their concerns about the too narrow scope on conflict dynamics in the DRC.

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