Global Policy

Cover image for Vol. 5 Issue 4

November 2014

Volume 5, Issue 4

Pages 391–509

  1. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Survey Article
    4. Special Section
    5. Practitioner Commentaries
    6. Practitioners' Special Section
    7. Response to Articles
    8. Review Essay
    1. The State of Human Rights (pages 391–400)

      Conor Gearty

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12159

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      Can human rights law stay on a credible route, one that respects human rights values while delivering substantive outcomes in the way that law is supposed to do? The answer to this question determines our human rights (law) future.

    2. Criminalising LGBT Persons Under National Criminal Law and Article 7(1)(h) and (3) of the ICC Statute (pages 401–414)

      Michael Bohlander

      Article first published online: 29 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12136

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      The main religion in the majority of the states criminalising LGBT persons is not Islam but Christianity, if only by a small margin.

    3. Bringing the ‘New Wars’ Debate Back on Track: Building on Critiques, Identifying Opportunities, and Moving Forward (pages 415–424)

      J. Juan Masullo and Bajo Jone Lauzurika

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12130

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      Within a broadened global security agenda, the protection of civilians is today one of the central responsibilities of the international community, becoming almost a norm: any intervention must be accompanied by a robust mandate to protect civilians.

  2. Survey Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Survey Article
    4. Special Section
    5. Practitioner Commentaries
    6. Practitioners' Special Section
    7. Response to Articles
    8. Review Essay
    1. Global Norms on Arms: The Significance of the Arms Trade Treaty for Global Security in World Politics (pages 425–432)

      Denise Garcia

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12182

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      The Treaty, the culmination of an extraordinary process and concerted efforts by both states and activists alike, represents a major step toward ending the irresponsible arms trade as a prevailing norm of conduct and driver of violence around the world.

  3. Special Section

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Survey Article
    4. Special Section
    5. Practitioner Commentaries
    6. Practitioners' Special Section
    7. Response to Articles
    8. Review Essay
    1. The Arms Trade Treaty and Global Civil Society, edited by Matthew Bolton

      The Arms Trade Treaty from a Global Civil Society Perspective: Introducing Global Policy's Special Section (pages 433–438)

      Matthew Bolton, Helena Whall, Allison Pytlak, Hector Guerra and Katelyn E. James

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12171

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      Evaluating the success of the treaty will require understanding of its economic, political, social, cultural and military impact at local, national, regional and global levels.

    2. Nascent Spirit of New York or Ghost of Arms Control Past?: The Normative Implications of the Arms Trade Treaty for Global Policymaking (pages 439–452)

      Matthew Bolton and Katelyn E. James

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12174

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      Ultimately the strength of the ATT will come from its interpretation and implementation. This is something civil society and maximalist states can influence, through monitoring, discursive framing and naming and shaming.

    3. The Role of Civil Society in the International Negotiations on the Arms Trade Treaty (pages 453–468)

      Helena Whall and Allison Pytlak

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12173

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      In the final analysis, the influence of civil society on the ATT negotiation process is perhaps best measured by the main players themselves. On the adoption of the treaty on 2 April 2013, the UN Secretary General took the opportunity to ‘commend the members of civil society for the critical role they played from the inception of this process, through their expert contributions and enthusiastic support’

    4. The Road Forward for the Arms Trade Treaty: A Civil Society Practitioner Commentary (pages 469–473)

      Matthew Bolton, Héctor Guerra, Ray Acheson and Oliver Sprague

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12172

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      Ultimately, effective implementation will require political will, commitment and learning from other processes

  4. Practitioner Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Survey Article
    4. Special Section
    5. Practitioner Commentaries
    6. Practitioners' Special Section
    7. Response to Articles
    8. Review Essay
    1. The Right to Food Beyond De-Mythification: Time to Shed the Inferiority Complex of Socio-Economic Rights (pages 474–476)

      Ioana Cismas

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12176

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      Human rights are expensive, and at times the action required of states is intrusive.

    2. Globalization and International Business as Interdependent Phenomena (pages 477–479)

      Michael Chibba

      Article first published online: 29 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12141

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      I define IB as any business with a significant international dimension that views the world as its business territory.

    3. Brands Weigh Up Their Social Role (pages 480–482)

      Anna Simpson

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12177

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      The right strategy has to span short, mid, and long-term goals – and the overarching ambition needs to be expressed simply enough, and yet with charisma.

  5. Practitioners' Special Section

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Survey Article
    4. Special Section
    5. Practitioner Commentaries
    6. Practitioners' Special Section
    7. Response to Articles
    8. Review Essay
    1. International Education - Students and Domestic Policy Challenges, edited by Brian Stoddart and Tom Kirk

      International Education: The Hard Edge of Soft Power (pages 483–484)

      Brian Stoddart

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12100

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      This paper sets out some current dimensions of the political evolution of international education which has become one of the world's great export commodity. The focus is on the emerging gap between recruitment and immigration policies, on the one hand, and the impact of those contradictions on source countries of students and the increasingly international nature of the academic workforce.

    2. International University Campuses and the Knowledge Economy: The University City Project in Adelaide (pages 485–493)

      Dean Forbes

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12099

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      The article examines how the steady growth in international education in the 1990s, particularly in the mobile cohort of international fee-paying students, contributed to the gradual re-formulation of the relationships between cities and universities.

    3. The Role for Technical and Vocational Education and Training and Donor Agencies in Developing Economies (pages 494–502)

      Simon Fraser

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12134

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      Vocational and technical education and training (TVET) has the potential to improve national economies by reducing skills gaps and unemployment.

  6. Response to Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Survey Article
    4. Special Section
    5. Practitioner Commentaries
    6. Practitioners' Special Section
    7. Response to Articles
    8. Review Essay
    1. Capital Controls: Economic Models and Contingency Strategies (pages 503–504)

      Zhonglu Zeng

      Article first published online: 29 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12144

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      While pursuing high economic growth, policy makers must be ready to bear the high economic risk accompanying that growth. The best policy is to find a realistic combination where the needed economic growth is pursued with controllable financial fluctuation.

    2. Is There an Alternative to the Present Model of Economic Governance of the Eurozone? (pages 505–507)

      Dražen Derado

      Article first published online: 29 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12145

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      The potential of the SGP in preventing future economic crises should not be underestimated.

  7. Review Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    3. Survey Article
    4. Special Section
    5. Practitioner Commentaries
    6. Practitioners' Special Section
    7. Response to Articles
    8. Review Essay
    1. Whither Global Governance? (pages 508–509)

      Richard Beardsworth

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12175

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      Is our era of globalization one of a transition of (hegemonic) power eastwards or is it one of a (post-hegemonic) pluralization of power centers (horizontal and vertical)?

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