Global Policy

Cover image for Vol. 5 Issue s1

Special Issue: Changing the European Debate: Focus on Climate Change Guest Editors: Helmut K. Anheier, Marie Julie Chenard and O. Arne Westad

October 2014

Volume 5, Issue Supplement s1

Pages 1–96

  1. Introduction

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction
    3. Climate Change and Economics
    4. Climate Change and Governance
    5. Special Section - Europe and the World
    1. You have free access to this content
      Executive Summary: Changing the European Debate–Focus on Climate Change (pages 1–2)

      Helmut K. Anheier, Marie Julie Chenard and O. Arne Westad

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12163

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Central to the Dahrendorf Symposium series is the aim to create an interface between excellent, state-of-the art academic research and policy-making.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Secure our Future: Towards a European Energy Strategy (pages 3–5)

      Günther H. Oettinger

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12150

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We should no longer tolerate barriers which impede energy flow within the EU. National borders can threaten the benefits of the Single Market, the competitiveness of our industry and the supply of basic needs to all our citizens. Fair competition, quality of service and free access must be guaranteed. The full and proper application of EU legislation is a must.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Challenging the European Climate Debate: Can Universal Climate Justice and Economics be Reconciled with Particularistic Politics? (pages 6–14)

      Felix Creutzig, Marcus Hedahl, James Rydge and Kacper Szulecki

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12156

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Climate justice demonstrates that action on climate change is a moral imperative.

  2. Climate Change and Economics

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction
    3. Climate Change and Economics
    4. Climate Change and Governance
    5. Special Section - Europe and the World
    1. You have free access to this content
      Does Environmental Sustainability Contradict Prosperity? (pages 15–20)

      Ottmar Edenhofer, Jan Christoph Steckel and Michael Jakob

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12164

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It is always a risk for decision makers to neglect short-term benefits and costs. Therefore, a smart design of climate policy has to reconcile the short-term and long-term perspective.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Overcoming the Mikado Situation (pages 21–23)

      Ernst Ulrich von Weizsäcker

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12165

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Our estimates of energy demand are built upon false beliefs in physics.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Possible ‘Contributions’ of European Energy Intensive Industries to the Global Climate Agreement (pages 24–34)

      Andrzej Ancygier and Anna Serzysko

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12157

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ambitious, inclusive, legally binding and foremost global climate change agreement might be one of the basic elements in creating an enabling environment for low-carbon growth and industry development.

  3. Climate Change and Governance

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction
    3. Climate Change and Economics
    4. Climate Change and Governance
    5. Special Section - Europe and the World
    1. You have free access to this content
      Governing Climate Change: A Case for Europe (pages 35–37)

      Norbert Röttgen

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12155

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The European Union needs to close ranks in order to stand its ground in our globalised world.

    2. You have free access to this content
      The Cardinal Sins of European Energy Policy: Nongovernance in an Uncertain Global Landscape (pages 38–51)

      Kacper Szulecki and Kirsten Westphal

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12153

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      European states lack a shared vision regarding the future of energy policy. What seems even more important, though, is that EU member states even lack a common understanding of their position in the international energy landscape.

    3. You have free access to this content
      The Need for Momentum in Europe's Climate Change Policies: Experiences from Germany's Energiewende (pages 52–54)

      Cem Özdemir

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12154

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Germany and Great Britain together emit one third of all EU emissions. Achieving the overall EU targets will thus require a transformation particularly in these two countries. There is no effective climate protection without addressing the biggest emitters.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Why Germany's Energiewende Reminds Us of the Virtues of Cooperation (pages 55–57)

      Markus Steigenberger and Lars Grotewold

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12158

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      More cooperation on the European level on support schemes for renewable technologies could leverage efficiency gains and help to optimise the use of resources.

  4. Special Section - Europe and the World

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction
    3. Climate Change and Economics
    4. Climate Change and Governance
    5. Special Section - Europe and the World
    1. You have free access to this content
      The EU's Future Role on the Global Stage (pages 58–67)

      Alexander Ruser and Helmut K. Anheier

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12146

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Growth potential among member states is unequally distributed. Nations least likely to be able to follow the European recovery strategy are most likely to have their political leeway reduced by policy recommendations related to the new economic governance.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Single Representative, Single Voice: Magical Thinking and the Representation of the EU on the World Stage (pages 68–75)

      Stéphanie Novak

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12147

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recent history has shown that the EU can lead effective civilian action even if such action is not supported by all the member states.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Eastern Partnership vs Eurasian Union? The EU–Russia Competition in the Shared Neighbourhood and the Ukraine Crisis (pages 76–85)

      David Cadier

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12152

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The protest movements in Ukraine demonstrated that the EU's norms and values are its greatest asset and thus it ought to stay true to them.

    4. You have free access to this content
      The EU's Engagement with Asia (pages 86–93)

      Marie Julie Chenard and O. Arne Westad

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12151

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On a bilateral level, the EU's engagement with China is paramount because China is the biggest polluter in absolute terms not only in Asia, but also in the world.

    5. You have free access to this content
      Europe's Role in Global Governance: Changing the European Debate (pages 94–96)

      Lord William Wallace of Saltaire

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12148

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sadly we are still a way long way from a transnational democracy. European governments are still stuck in a security paradigm which is out of date; with military investments which still reflect the situation of the cold war.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION