Global Policy

Cover image for Vol. 6 Issue 4

November 2015

Volume 6, Issue 4

Pages 329–530

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Research Articles
    4. Special Section
    5. Survey Article
    6. Practitioners' Special Section
    7. Practitioner Commentaries
    1. Frontiers Ahead (page 329)

      David Held and Eva-Maria Nag

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12296

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      In its first five years Global Policy has become a unique hub generating research and cutting edge analysis. It has brought together world class academics and practitioners and is read by academics, experts and a wider general public.

  2. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Research Articles
    4. Special Section
    5. Survey Article
    6. Practitioners' Special Section
    7. Practitioner Commentaries
    1. Financial Stability and the Trans-Pacific Partnership: Lessons from Chile and Malaysia (pages 330–342)

      Ricardo Ffrench-Davis, Kevin P. Gallagher, Mah-Hui Lim and Katherine Soverel

      Article first published online: 6 OCT 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12249

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      What can often put a developing country at a disadvantage is that when negotiating an FTA or a BIT there is a ‘negative list’ approach whereby a nation is expected to liberalize all sectors except a handful where they still want to regulate. Thus if a nation wanted to regulate a new financial ‘innovation’ in the future such as a new form of derivative, that nation would not be permitted to regulate the related investments because it hadn't anticipated the innovation and reserved the right to regulate during the negotiation.

    2. The Median is the Message: A Good Enough Measure of Material Wellbeing and Shared Development Progress (pages 343–357)

      Nancy Birdsall and Christian J. Meyer

      Article first published online: 14 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12239

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      We propose a simple and easily understood measure of material well-being, and of change in material well-being of the ‘typical’ person in developing countries, i.e. of the person or household who is at the median of the distribution of per capita consumption expenditure. We argue that this measure has three advantages: simplicity and accessibility, durability, and relevance as a broad reflection of the development as a modernization process.

    3. Is there a Future for ‘Jus ex Bello’? (pages 358–368)

      Ariel Colonomos

      Article first published online: 14 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12244

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      In order to start a war, one should make the case for the war to come to an end within a reasonable space of time. This would rule out wars that are pursued for the sake of unrealistic goals such as making the world safe for democracy or fighting terror.

    4. Responsibility Shirking at the United Nations Security Council: Constraints, Frustrations, Remedies (pages 369–378)

      Kjell Engelbrekt

      Article first published online: 14 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12259

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      Responsibility shirking at the UNSC is a problem that lacks a comprehensive solution, especially in a short- to mid-term perspective. A ‘major reform’ option that would entail UN Charter amendments and the enlargement of the Council, in particular by extending the veto to additional permanent member states, remains an unlikely prospect with unclear implications for Council procedure and practice.

    5. Wildlife NGOs: From Adversaries to Collaborators (pages 379–388)

      Margi Prideaux

      Article first published online: 14 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12253

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      Moving to a situation where the NGO community is able to contribute more systematically, consistently and transparently to the work of CMS will require the right dynamic to be created. Active dialogue, trust building (which includes mutual transparency and accountability) and a commitment and shared understanding will all need to be developed. Importantly, NGO contributions need to be formally recognised as implementation delivery. NGOs should be able to represent their work in their own stead.

    6. The Process of Macroprudential Oversight in Europe (pages 389–407)

      Peter Sarlin and Henrik J. Nyman

      Article first published online: 17 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12255

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      In terms of process metrics, despite wide agreement on the need for them, there are currently no measures of well-functioning macroprudential oversight.

    7. Expatriation: A Last Refuge for the Wealthy? (pages 408–417)

      Robert T. Kudrle

      Article first published online: 18 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12218

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      The right to tax is an essential element of sovereignty, and growing international cooperation combined with information technology is starting to effectively combat the tax evasion that globalization has increasingly abetted.

    8. What Shapes Abortion Law? – A Global Perspective (pages 418–428)

      Achim Hildebrandt

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12208

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      Advocates of liberalization should not succumb to the common dichotomy of pro-life and pro-choice. Anti-legal abortion is not pro-life, prohibitions do not work, they only cause harm.

  3. Special Section

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Research Articles
    4. Special Section
    5. Survey Article
    6. Practitioners' Special Section
    7. Practitioner Commentaries
    1. Accountability in International Development Finance, edited by Kate Macdonald and May Miller-Dawkins

      Accountability in Public International Development Finance (pages 429–434)

      Kate Macdonald and May Miller-Dawkins

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12273

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      As the contributions to this collection highlight, the capacities and limits of formal mechanisms of accountability to promote their intended normative purposes depend in important ways on the political and institutional contexts in which accountability mechanisms operate.

    2. ProSAVANA and the Expanding Scope of Accountability in Brazil's Development Cooperation (pages 435–445)

      Lídia Cabral and Iara Leite

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12274

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      Though hardly neutral actors, public institutions within both provider and recipient countries have a potential role to play in fostering wider representation and brokering competing domestic interests

    3. The Depoliticisation of Accountability Processes for Land-Based Grievances, and the IFC CAO (pages 446–454)

      Samantha Balaton-Chrimes and Fiona Haines

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12275

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      The insights from the case study examined here underscore the importance of context-specific analysis of accountability processes.

    4. Assessing Accountability in Practice: The Asian Development Bank's Accountability Mechanism (pages 455–465)

      Susan Park

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12276

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      Powerful member states demanded the ADB create an external accountability mechanism. This mechanism provides recourse to people that are or might be ‘directly materially and adversely affected’ by a development project financed by the ADB.

  4. Survey Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Research Articles
    4. Special Section
    5. Survey Article
    6. Practitioners' Special Section
    7. Practitioner Commentaries
    1. Reinvigorating International Climate Policy: A Comprehensive Framework for Effective Nonstate Action (pages 466–473)

      Sander Chan, Harro van Asselt, Thomas Hale, Kenneth W. Abbott, Marianne Beisheim, Matthew Hoffmann, Brendan Guy, Niklas Höhne, Angel Hsu, Philipp Pattberg, Pieter Pauw, Céline Ramstein and Oscar Widerberg

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12294

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      Through technical consultations with national governments, the framework will drive national climate aspirations, and will demonstrate proven approaches that allow for more ambitious national mitigation and adaptation commitments, particularly in subsequent rounds of nationally determined contributions and national adaptation plans and strategies.

  5. Practitioners' Special Section

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Research Articles
    4. Special Section
    5. Survey Article
    6. Practitioners' Special Section
    7. Practitioner Commentaries
    1. Sustainable Business in the Stakeholder Era, edited by Arved Lüth and Marcel Stierl

      Power and Purpose: Harnessing Stakeholder Partnerships for the Great Transformation (pages 474–476)

      Arved Lüth

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12214

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      The first purpose is to build or maintain a successful business, which means your aim is to strengthen relational capabilities. The second purpose is to use your successful business to achieve a truly sustainable development of our societies, so you need to strengthen additional transformational capabilities.

    2. The Role of Integrated Thinking in Changing Corporate Behaviour (page 477)

      Mervyn E. King

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12205

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      Inclusive governance involves the board identifying the company's key stakeholders and taking account of their legitimate and reasonable needs, interests and expectations of the company, but making a decision always in the best interests of the company for the maximisation of total value.

    3. Empowered by Transparency: Shaping Business for the Future (pages 478–480)

      Nelmara Arbex

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12207

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      Stakeholder engagement can be understood in different ways: as a compliance task, as a sophisticated public relations exercise, as a management tool, or to unlock the power to transform companies into the organizations they will have to become if they are to survive in the future.

    4. The Sustainability Code – A New Approach Linking Economy and Society towards Sustainability (pages 481–482)

      Yvonne Zwick

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12206

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      The Sustainability Code is repeatedly acknowledged by the EU Commission as good practice for modern CSR concepts and fulfilment of the requirements of the Directive on non-financial reporting. The Code should be adopted by Europe as a whole.

    5. Stakeholder-centricity a Precondition to Managing Sustainability Successfully (pages 483–485)

      CB Bhattacharya

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12197

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      Sustainability is better thought of as a journey than as a destination.

    6. Stakeholder Relations Matter: You Need to Count on Them – But it's Hard to Count Them (pages 486–488)

      Nadine-Lan Hönighaus and Thorsten Pinkepank

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12237

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      There are some approaches to value the value of stakeholder relations, but still there is no simple, ‘metric answer’ in sight – and we are afraid to say: A simple answer might not be even helpful. Not everything that counts can be counted.

    7. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Licence to Operate – Ingredients for Successful and Sustainable Stakeholder Management (pages 489–491)

      Anne Wolf and Ronny Kaufmann

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12200

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      The way in which corporations interact with stakeholders plays a decisive role in their public perception. Today, each organisation must consciously define its position in societal discourse and in the interplay of business, politics and society.

    8. If Stakeholders Ruled the World: Stakeholder Relations in the 21st Century (pages 492–494)

      Dietlind Freiberg

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12236

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      Customers are the most important external stakeholder group, because they make the buying decision. This is the reason why stakeholder management should be acknowledged as a vital part of the sustainability business case.

    9. When Listening Improves Corporate Success (pages 495–497)

      Emilio Galli Zugaro

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12202

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      One of the most effective ways to learn and practice empathy is to put yourself into the shoes of another.

    10. ‘Communicative Equations’: Towards a More Agile PR Practice in the Network Society (pages 498–500)

      João Duarte

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12204

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      Agile PR therefore explores the benefits of a coordinated teamwork, consistently focused on deliverables and always ensuring relevant information is shared at all times, driving better and more informed decision making, and more resilient research, planning, execution and evaluation of PR work.

    11. How Much Attention to Stakeholder Interests? A Practitioner's View of the Need to Take Account of Stakeholder Interests (pages 501–503)

      Jon White

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12254

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      Addressing stakeholder interests, without being overwhelmed by them, requires improvement to approaches to high level decision-making and changes in leadership and management. From an examination of obstacles to improved decision-making some obvious next steps suggest themselves. These are easier to identify than to take.

    12. Take Your Time…And Listen (pages 504–506)

      Toni Muzi Falconi

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12196

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      An increased effort to listen to key stakeholder expectations on a relevant issue before making any relevant decision, improves the quality of the decision.

    13. Creating Shared Value by Fostering Regional Development: The ‘Partners in Responsibility‘ Method for SME (pages 507–509)

      Arved Lüth and Marcel Stierl

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12238

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      By networking activities with other businesses and pooling resources to address pressing social issues, companies can greatly increase the impact of their efforts.

  6. Practitioner Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Research Articles
    4. Special Section
    5. Survey Article
    6. Practitioners' Special Section
    7. Practitioner Commentaries
    1. The UN at 70: Confronting the Crisis of Global Governance (pages 510–516)

      Madeleine K. Albright and Ibrahim A. Gambari

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12292

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      Guaranteeing security and justice for all peoples and nations is the practical and moral imperative of our time. Therefore, the recommendations of the Commission are intended, in this seventieth anniversary year of the United Nations, as a roadmap for broad-based policy dialogue and an ambitious institutional reform agenda aimed at 2020, the seventy-fifth anniversary of the United Nations.

    2. China and India and The New Climate Regime: The Emergence of a New Paradigm (pages 517–521)

      Mukul Sanwal and Bo Wang

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12297

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      This emerging consensus reflects international cooperation goals rather than burden sharing obligations.

    3. Financing Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Projects in Egypt (pages 522–525)

      Mohamed Mansour

      Article first published online: 6 APR 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12217

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      The need for considerable investment finance comes at a time when government resources will be tight. As such, it is necessary to have a well-designed and coordinated approach in order to tap international financial and technical resources.

    4. The European Court Of Human Rights: A ‘Culture of Bad Faith’? (pages 526–530)

      Noemi Manco

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12191

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      If the European Court of Human Rights were to set out clear standards through consistent case law, it might play a more active role in setting progressive human rights standards in Europe, as it was first intended to do on its creation.

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