Global Policy

Cover image for Vol. 6 Issue S1

Special Issue: “Changing the European Debate: A Rollback of Democracy”

June 2015

Volume 6, Issue Supplement S1

Pages 1–129

Issue edited by: Helmut K. Anheier

  1. Introduction

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction
    3. A rollback of democracy: approaches
    4. A rollback of democracy: regional perspectives
    5. A rollback of democracy: issues
    6. Conclusion
    1. Current Trajectories of Democracy – Diagnosis, Implications, Proposals (pages 1–3)

      Helmut K. Anheier

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12219

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      There is agreement across the various contributions to the special issue that the state of democratic systems has deteriorated – not only in Europe but also in the United States. Of course, attention must be paid to the different contexts, reasons and the degrees to which democracies are experiences a period of unease. There is also agreement as to the necessity of national democracies - and the EU as a supranational political actor - to re-think current practices and to allow for a new democratic ethos that gives greater room for contestation.

  2. A rollback of democracy: approaches

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction
    3. A rollback of democracy: approaches
    4. A rollback of democracy: regional perspectives
    5. A rollback of democracy: issues
    6. Conclusion
    1. Rollback of Democracy? A Tocquevillean Perspective (pages 4–7)

      Ewa Atanassow

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12222

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      In order to judge the state of democracy today, we need to clarify what we mean by democracy. Simply assuming that we know what democracy is would be to ignore a long and tragic history, and its enduring effects on the social and political imaginaries.

    2. Trajectories and Transformations of the Democratic Representative System (pages 8–16)

      Dario Castiglione

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12223

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      The centrality of parliament, or of the legislative power in general, was the key institutional way in which representation could be made to work democratically. Although never fully resolved in theory or in practice, the reconciliation of the interests of the parts (citizens, groups, factions) with that of the whole (community, public interest) was possible through the existence of a unitary moment of decision making. Can modern democratic representation do away with such a moment?

    3. Direct Democracy in Europe: Potentials and Pitfalls (pages 17–27)

      Arndt Leininger

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12224

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      The moderate use of referendums can indeed serve to increase turnout, particularly when elections and referendums are held simultaneously.

  3. A rollback of democracy: regional perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction
    3. A rollback of democracy: approaches
    4. A rollback of democracy: regional perspectives
    5. A rollback of democracy: issues
    6. Conclusion
    1. The Hollowing and Backsliding of Democracy in East Central Europe (pages 28–37)

      Béla Greskovits

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12225

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      At the grass-roots level of civil organization, the difficult task seems to be to penetrate nationalistic and other potentially exclusive communities with more inclusive sentiments of (local) patriotism, which are compatible with being European.

    2. Regional Normalization and National Deviations: EU Integration and Transformations in Europe's Eastern Periphery (pages 38–45)

      László Bruszt

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12226

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      EU has to build Europe-wide capacities to manage economic interdependence, invent new policies of furthering catch-up growth in its peripheries and help extending the range of the beneficiaries of integration.

    3. External Democracy Promotion and Protection: the EU Approach (pages 46–48)

      Elisabeth Kotthaus

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12227

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      Shifting powers between institutions is much less important than getting our culture and our attitude right. The existing Treaties provide a framework that allows for changing priorities and the need to go further on some areas of integration, such as the necessary further development of our economic and monetary union to underpin the reality of our single currency.

    4. Democracy in America, 2015 (pages 49–55)

      Didi Kuo and Nolan McCarty

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12228

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      While it may be too early to claim a rollback of democracy, recent trends indicate that polarization and inequality will continue to erode governance and accountability in the United States.

    5. Arduous Learning or New Uncertainties? The Emergence of German Diplomacy in the Ukrainian Crisis (pages 56–72)

      Wolfgang Seibel

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12229

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      German foreign policy did adapt its principled beliefs as far as German-Russian relationship is concerned and was successful in integrating EU and NATO over the crisis, but did not manage to adapt decisively causal beliefs at the tactical level.

  4. A rollback of democracy: issues

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction
    3. A rollback of democracy: approaches
    4. A rollback of democracy: regional perspectives
    5. A rollback of democracy: issues
    6. Conclusion
    1. European Democracy Promotion in Crisis: Conflicts of Objectives, Neglected External–Domestic Interactions and the Authoritarian Backlash (pages 73–82)

      Sonja Grimm

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12230

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      The more democratically empowered domestic actors get, they more they will emancipate themselves from external reform demands.

    2. By the Markets, of the Markets, for the Markets? Technocratic Decision Making and the Hollowing Out of Democracy (pages 83–92)

      Alexander Ruser

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12231

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      Governance innovation at the European level and the inherent pressure on national governments to follow the political agenda to recover from the Euro crisis have put emphasize on ‘necessary’ actions to calm the markets and restore the functioning of the financial system.

    3. Political Culture, Political Satisfaction and the Rollback of Democracy (pages 93–105)

      Bernhard Weßels

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12232

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      The idea of democracy, its norms, and rules are so highly relevant to the people and constitutionally so strongly protected that for the time being any rollback of the normative dimension of democracy seems rather unlikely. This is, however, no reason for a false sense of security. Democracy is a fragile public good; its legitimacy and support cannot persist if it does not perform well.

    4. When Parties Make Peoples (pages 106–114)

      Jonathan White

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12233

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      The challenge for democratic design, and for partisan practice itself, is to channel these currents so they augment rather than detract from the political process.

    5. Fixing Europe Is About Performance, Not Democracy (pages 115–126)

      Alina Mungiu-Pippidi

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12234

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      A ‘European Public Prosecutor‘ should be created to investigate, prosecute and bring to justice those who commit criminal offences which affect the Union's financial interests.

  5. Conclusion

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction
    3. A rollback of democracy: approaches
    4. A rollback of democracy: regional perspectives
    5. A rollback of democracy: issues
    6. Conclusion
    1. Conclusion: How to Rule the Void? Policy Responses to a ‘Hollowing Out’ of Democracy (pages 127–129)

      Helmut K. Anheier

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12235

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Democracy requires the critical engagement of practitioners and experts alike.

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