Global Policy

Cover image for Vol. 7 Issue 2

May 2016

Volume 7, Issue 2

Pages 131–300

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    4. Survey Articles
    5. Special Section Articles
    6. Practitioner Commentaries
    1. Issue Information (pages 131–133)

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12281

    2. Affiliated Partners Page (page 134)

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12337

  2. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    4. Survey Articles
    5. Special Section Articles
    6. Practitioner Commentaries
    1. Ethical Quandaries in War Zones, When Mass Atrocity Prevention Fails (pages 135–145)

      Thomas G. Weiss

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12315

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      Politicization no less than militarization calls into question the independence, neutrality, and impartiality that previously guided humanitarian judgments and action.

    2. How Peace Agreements Undermine the Rule of Law in New War Settings (pages 146–155)

      Mary Kaldor

      Version of Record online: 1 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12312

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      Given the persistent character of new wars, ending impunity is the only way to achieve sustainable peace.

    3. Human Security and the New Global Threats: Discourse, Taxonomy and Implications (pages 156–173)

      Rogelio Madrueño-Aguilar

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12290

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      The fact that relevant international agreements in the field of development are far from a reality for many developing countries, and that these nations are further hampered by institutional constraints – to strengthen their institutional capacities at the national and local levels –, both represent divergent trends in effective human security and individual liberty.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Military Expenditure Trends for 1960–2014 and What They Reveal (pages 174–184)

      Todd Sandler and Justin George

      Version of Record online: 7 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12328

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      China still has a long ways to go to match US military might. Nevertheless, the United States needs to increase its military assets in the Far East. NATO allies, in general, must foster great economic and military ties to East Asian and Pacific countries.

    5. You have free access to this content
      Networks and Power: Why Networks are Hierarchical Not Flat and What Can Be Done About It (pages 185–197)

      Moira V. Faul

      Version of Record online: 12 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12270

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      Concerted action to rewire networks towards partnership requires agency from network-central (not peripheral) actors to restructure their networks.

    6. What Role Can the G20 Play in Global Energy Governance? Implications for China's Presidency (pages 198–206)

      Philip Andrews-Speed and Xunpeng Shi

      Version of Record online: 12 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12288

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      China's ever-increasing integration into international markets for energy commodities, investment and equipment provides the incentive to use its 2016 Presidency of the G20 to demonstrate definitive leadership on the issue of global energy governance, possibly in cooperation with the USA.

    7. Frustrated Leadership: Russia's Economic Alternative to the West (pages 207–216)

      Juliet Johnson and Seçkin Köstem

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12301

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      Ultimately, the sanctions jeopardize Russia's hard-won integration in the international financial system, integration that is vital for sustained Russian economic development. The resulting situation challenges not only Russia and its neighbors, but also the United States and the European Union.

    8. A Global Trend EU-style: Democracy Promotion in ‘Fragile’ and Conflict-Affected South Caucasus (pages 217–226)

      Nelli Babayan

      Version of Record online: 5 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12305

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      The establishment of the EED has not only marked a grand turn of the EU to civil society but also indicated the long-awaited willingness to reform its approach for potentially enhanced effectiveness.

    9. Financial Innovation, Derivatives and the UK and US Interest Rate Swap Scandals: Drawing New Boundaries for the Regulation of Financial Innovation (pages 227–236)

      Vincenzo Bavoso

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12300

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      A paradigmatic shift is needed in order to regulate behaviour in financial institutions and recalibrate their role in a socially desirable dimension.

  3. Survey Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    4. Survey Articles
    5. Special Section Articles
    6. Practitioner Commentaries
    1. You have free access to this content
      Climate Change, Migration and the Cosmopolitan Dilemma (pages 237–246)

      David Held

      Version of Record online: 9 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12309

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      Citizenship is not built on exclusive membership in a single community, but on a set of principles and legal arrangements which link people together in diverse communities which significantly affect them.

    2. The WTO in Nairobi: The Demise of the Doha Development Agenda and the Future of the Multilateral Trading System (pages 247–255)

      Rorden Wilkinson, Erin Hannah and James Scott

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12339

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      The great irony here is that the new negotiating mode delivered a ministerial outcome that was more inclusive and participatory than ever before.

  4. Special Section Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    4. Survey Articles
    5. Special Section Articles
    6. Practitioner Commentaries
    1. Law and Negotiation in Conflict, edited by Catherine Turner

      Editorial Comment: Law and Negotiation in Conflict: Theory, Policy and Practice (pages 256–260)

      Catherine Turner

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12336

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      We need to move beyond the question of whether law should constrain political negotiation, or whether law can be subordinated to political expediency. Both law and negotiation have a role to play in peace negotiation. What is important, and to date underexplored, is the interplay between the two of them.

    2. Normative Limits of Peace Negotiations: Questions, Guidance and Prospects (pages 261–266)

      Martin Wählisch

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12325

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      Providing guidance is about walking a tightrope between being too dogmatically prescriptive or too amenable to exceptions. Eventually, advice needs to be concrete, accessible and balanced based on practice and aspirations.

    3. Women, Peace and Security – Negotiating in Women's Best Interests (pages 267–271)

      Rashida Manjoo

      Version of Record online: 8 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12313

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      The political rhetoric on women, peace and security, is challenged by the minimal or lack of practical realisation of laudable goals on gender equality; inclusion and participation of women in peace and security negotiations and processes; and the need to change the reality on the ground, as reflected in numerous standard-setting documents, including the Security Council resolutions

    4. How Does International Law Condition Responses to Conflict and Negotiation? (pages 272–277)

      Aoife O'Donoghue

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12335

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      This is not a call to abandon law but rather a recognition that law, in looking forward and backward from a single temporal point, can only provide partial solutions and truths and that over reliance on law's framing of conflict may lead to conflict's perpetuation rather than its successful negotiation.

    5. Transitional Justice as Elite Justice? Compromise Justice and Transition in Tunisia (pages 278–281)

      Christopher K. Lamont and Hannah Pannwitz

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12291

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      How Tunisia's new government under Essebsi and Essid addresses outstanding socio-economic grievances and a broader legacy of structural violence inherited from Bourguiba and Ben Ali, will serve as a test as to whether or not transitional justice in Tunisia will move beyond an elite discourse and give voice to the marginalized.

    6. Law and Negotiation: A Role for a Transformative Approach? (pages 282–287)

      Aisling Swaine

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12277

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      The concept of ‘transformation’ offers a window for examining the synergies between how we utilize law and the difference it can make in the lives of men and women.

  5. Practitioner Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    4. Survey Articles
    5. Special Section Articles
    6. Practitioner Commentaries
    1. Insights to Great Powers' Desire to Establish Institutions: Comparison of ADB, AMF, AMRO and AIIB (pages 288–292)

      Shintaro Hamanaka

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12304

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      What is unique about AIIB compared against past cases is not the behavior of regional dominant power (Japan in the past and China now), but the reaction of the US.

    2. How to Foster Sustainability (pages 293–295)

      Jindra Cekan

      Version of Record online: 12 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12284

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      Not only do we need to learn about what was self-sustained afterwards, we need to know more than whether those participants’ situations are improving while a program is in full swing, and learn what it takes for things to continue to improve after the funding goes away. What programs and policies need to be in place to support sustainability?

    3. Administering and Governing with Technology: The Question of Information Communication Technology and E-Governance (pages 296–300)

      Jean-Marc Coicaud

      Version of Record online: 22 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1758-5899.12311

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      We need to be aware that ICT and e-governance can truly contribute to strengthening administration and government/governance only if administration and government/governance remains a meaningful possibility, committed to and able to produce public goods and services.

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