SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

References

  • Acker, J. (1990) Hierarchies, jobs, bodies: a theory of gendered organizations. Gender & Society, 4,2, 139158.
  • Acker, J. (1992) From sex roles to gendered institutions. Contemporary Sociology, 21,5, 565569.
  • Alvesson, M. and Due Billing, Y. (1997) Understanding Gender and Organisations. London: Sage Publications.
  • Aston, J., Clegg, M., Diplock, E., Ritchie, H. and Willison, R. (2005) Key Interim Update of Key Indicators of Women's Position in Britain. URN 04/191, Women and Equality Unit, Department of Trade and Industry.
  • Becker, G.S. (1991) A Treatise on the Family (Enlarged Edition). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
  • Borrill, C. and Kidd, J.M. (1994) New parents at work: jobs, families and the psychological contract. British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 22,2, 219231.
  • Budig, M.J. and England, P. (2001) The wage penalty for motherhood. American Sociological Review, 66,2, 204225.
  • Buzzanell, P.M. and Liu, M. (2007) It's ‘give and take’: maternity leave as a conflict management process. Human Relations, 60,3, 463495.
  • Chevalier, A. and Viitanen, T. (2002) The causality between female labour force participation and the supply of childcare. Applied Economics Letters, 9, 915918.
  • Cockburn, C. (1991) In the Way of Women, Men's Resistance to Sex Equality in Organizations. London: Macmillan.
  • Collinson, D. and Hearn, J. (1994) Naming men as men: implications for work, organization and management. Gender, Work & Organization, 1, 222.
  • Connell, R.W. (1998) Masculinities and globalization. Men and Masculinities, 1,1, 323.
  • Connell, R.W. and Messerschmidt, J.W. (2005) Hegemonic masculinity: rethinking the concept. Gender & Society, 19,6, 131.
  • Connolly, S. and Gregory, M. (2008) Moving down: women's part-time work and occupational change in Britain 1991–2001. Economic Journal, 118,526, F52F76.
  • Cooper, M. (2000) Being the go-to guy: fatherhood, masculinity, and the organization of work in Silicon Valley. Qualitative Sociology, 23,4, 397402.
  • Correll, S., Bernard, S. and Paik, I. (2007) Getting a job: is there a motherhood penalty? American Journal of Sociology, 5, 12971338.
  • Crittenden, A. (2001) The Price of Motherhood. New York: Metropolitan Books.
  • Crosby, F., Williams, J. and Biernat, M. (2004) The maternal wall. Journal of Social Issues, 60,4, 675682.
  • Damaske, S. (2011) For the Family? How Class and Gender Shape Women's Work. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Dambrin, C. and Lambert, C. (2008) Mothering or auditing? The case of two big four in France. Accounting, Auditing and Accountability Journal, 21,4, 474506.
  • de Laat, J. and Sevilla-Sanz, A. (2011) The fertility and women's labor force participation puzzle in OECD countries: the role of men's home production. Feminist Economics, 17,2, 87119.
  • Dex, S., Joshi, H. and Macran, S. (1996) A widening gulf among Britain's mothers. Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 12,1, 6575.
  • Dex, S., Joshi, H., Macran, S. and McCulloch, A. (1998) Women's employment transitions around childbearing. Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, 60, 97115.
  • Donaldson, M. (1993) What is hegemonic masculinity? Theory and Society, Special Issue: Masculinities, 22,5, 643657.
  • Duncan, S. and Edwards, R. (1999) Lone Mothers, Paid Work and Gendered Moral Rationalities. London: Macmillan.
  • Ford, J. and Collinson, D. (2011) In search of the perfect manager? Work-life balance and managerial work. Work, Employment & Society, 25,2, 257273.
  • Gatrell, C. (2007) A fractional commitment? Part-time work and the maternal body. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 18,3, 462475.
  • Gatrell, C. (2011) Policy and the pregnant body at work: strategies of secrecy, silence and supra-performance. Gender, Work & Organization, 18,2, 158181.
  • Glass, J. and Riley, L. (1998) Family responsive policies and employee retention following childbirth. Social Forces, 76,4, 14011435.
  • Green, F. (2001) It's been a hard day's night: the concentration and intensification of work in late 20th century Britain. British Journal of Industrial Relations, 39,1, 5380.
  • Hakim, C. (2002) Lifestyle preferences as determinants of women's differentiated labor market careers. Work and Occupations, 29, 428459.
  • Halpert, J.A. and Burg, J.H. (1997) Mixed messages: co-worker responses to the pregnant employee. Journal of Business and Psychology, 12,2, 241253.
  • Harkness, S. and Waldfogel, J. (2003) The family gap in pay: evidence from seven industrialized countries. Research in Labor Economics, 22, 369414.
  • Haynes, K. (2008) (Re)figuring accounting and maternal bodies: the gendered embodiment of accounting professionals. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 33,4–5, 328348.
  • Higher Education Policy Institute (2009) Male and Female Participation and Progression in Higher Education. Oxford: Higher Education Policy Institute.
  • Himmelweit, S. and Sigala, M. (2004) Choice and the relationship between identities and behaviour for mothers with pre-school children: some implications for policy from a UK study. Journal of Social Policy, 33,3, 455478.
  • Hodges, M.J. and Budig, M.J. (2010) Who gets the daddy bonus? Organizational hegemonic masculinity and the impact of fatherhood on earnings. Gender & Society, 24,6, 717745.
  • Houston, D. and Marks, G. (2003) The role of planning and workplace support in returning to work after maternity leave. British Journal of Industrial Relations, 41,2, 197214.
  • Jacobs, J. and Gerson, K. (2004) The Time Divide: Work, Family, and Gender Inequality. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
  • Joshi, H., Paci, P. and Waldfogel, J. (1999) The wages of motherhood: better or worse? Cambridge Journal of Economics, 23, 543564.
  • Kanji, S. (2011) What keeps mothers in full-time employment? European Sociological Review, 27,4, 509526.
  • Kanji, S. (2013) Do fathers work fewer paid hours when their female partner is the main or an equal earner? Work, Employment and Society. DOI:10.1177/0950017012460321.
  • Kanter, R.M. (1993) Men and Women of the Corporation (2nd edn). New York: Basic Books.
  • Kelly, E.L., Kossek, E.E., Hammer, L.B., Durham, M., Bray, J. and Chermack, K. (2008) Getting there from here: research on the effects of work–family initiatives on work–family conflict and business outcomes. The Academy of Management Annals, 2, 305349.
  • Knights, D. and Kerfoot, D. (2004) Between representations and subjectivity: gender binaries and the politics of organizational transformation. Gender, Work & Organization, 11,4, 430455.
  • Lewis, J. (1992) Gender and the development of welfare regimes. Journal of European Social Policy, 3, 159173.
  • Longhurst, R. (2001) Bodies: Exploring Fluid Boundaries. London: Routledge.
  • Lovejoy, M. and Stone, P. (2011) Opting back in: the influence of time at home on professional women's career redirection after opting out. Gender, Work & Organization, 19,6, 631653.
  • Lyness, K.S. and Thompson, D.E. (2000) Climbing the corporate ladder: do female and male executives follow the same route? Journal of Applied Psychology, 85,1, 86101.
  • Miller, T. (2007) ‘Is this what motherhood is all about?’ Weaving experiences and discourse through transition to first-time motherhood. Gender & Society, 21, 337358.
  • O'Connor, P. (1996) Organisational culture as a barrier to women's promotion. Economic and Social Review, 3, 187216.
  • Pateman, C. (1988) The Sexual Contract. Cambridge: Polity Press.
  • Rapoport, R., Bailyn, L., Fletcher, J.K. and Pruitt, B.H. (2002) Beyond Work-Family Balance: Advancing Gender Equity and Workplace Performance. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
  • Rawls, J. (1971) A Theory of Justice. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
  • Rodgers, J. (2004) Hourly wages of full-time employees in Australia. Australian Journal of Labour Economics, 7,2, 231254.
  • Rousseau, J.J. (1968 [1762]) The Social Contract, or Principles of Political Right (trans. H.J. Tozer). London: Penguin Classics.
  • Rubin, H.J. and Rubin, I.S. (2005) Qualitative Interviewing: The Art of Hearing Data (2nd edn). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  • Sathe, V. (1983) Implications of corporate culture: a manager's guide to action. Organizational Dynamics, 12,2, 423.
  • Schein, E. (1996) Culture: the missing concept in organizational studies. Administrative Science Quarterly, 41,2, 229240.
  • Simpson, R. (1998) Presenteeism, power and organisational change: long hours as a career barrier and the impact on the working lives of women managers. British Journal of Management, 9, 3750.
    Direct Link:
  • Smithson, J. and Stokoe, E. (2005) Discourses of work–life balance: negotiating ‘genderblind’ terms in organizations. Gender, Work & Organization, 12, 147168.
  • Stone, P. and Lovejoy, M. (2004) Fast track women and the ‘choice’ to stay home. Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 596, 6283.
  • Swiss, D.J. (1996) Women Breaking Through: Overcoming the Final 10 Obstacles at Work. Princeton, NJ: Peterson's/Pacesetter Books.
  • Thompson, C.A., Beauvais, L.L. and Lyness, K.S. (1999) When work–family benefits are not enough: the influence of work–family culture on benefit utilization, organizational attachment, and work–family conflict. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 54, 392415.
  • Wajcman, J. (1998) Managing Like a Man: Women and Men in Corporate Management. Cambridge: Polity.
  • Watts, J. (2009) ‘Allowed into a man's world’ meanings of work–life balance: perspectives of women civil engineers as ‘minority’ workers in construction. Gender, Work & Organisation, 16,1, 3757.
  • Wilkins, A. (1983) The culture audit: a tool for understanding organizations. Organizational Dynamics, 12,2, 2428.
  • Williams, J. (2001) Unbending Gender: Why Work and Family Conflict and What to Do About It. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Wilson, E.M. (1997) Exploring gendered cultures. Hallinon Tutkimus, 4, 289303.
  • Wood, G.J. and Newton, J. (2006) Childlessness and women managers: ‘choice’, context and discourses. Gender, Work & Organisation, 13,4, 338358.
  • Young, I. (1989) Polity and group difference: a critique of the ideal of universal citizenship. Ethics, 99,2, 250274.