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Malposition and expulsion of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system among women with inherited bleeding disorders

Authors

  • E. Rimmer,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
    2. CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
    3. Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada
    • Correspondence: Emily Rimmer, MD FRCPC, ON2052-675 McDermot Ave. Winnipeg, MB R3E 0V9, Canada.

      Tel.: 204 787 1707; fax: 204 786 0196;

      e-mail: umrimme0@cc.umanitoba.ca

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  • M. A. Jamieson,

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada
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  • P. James

    1. Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada
    2. Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada
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Summary

The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) is indicated for the management of menorrhagia and for contraception. The LNG-IUS is effective at reducing menstrual bleeding and improving haemoglobin among women with bleeding disorders. Expulsion rates for the LNG-IUS among normal women are reported to be approximately 5–10%. The aim of this study was to examine the malposition and expulsion rates of the LNG-IUS among women with inherited bleeding disorders. We conducted a retrospective study of women with an inherited bleeding disorder in Kingston, Canada treated with an LNG-IUS between May 2005 and June 2012. The primary outcome was a combined endpoint of expulsion and/or malposition. Predetermined secondary outcomes were patient satisfaction and changes in haemoglobin and ferritin levels. The median age of the women at the time of LNG-IUS insertion was 31 years (range 18–43, mean 32.1 years). The most common diagnosis was type 1 VWD (12/20, 60%). There were three LNG-IUS expulsions and two episodes of device malposition resulting in removal [5/20 (25.0%), 95% CI 11.2–46.9%]. An additional five women had their device removed prematurely. The overall proportion of devices resulting in discontinuation in this population was 10/20 (50.0%, 95% CI 29.9–70.1%). In this retrospective study, a significant proportion of women with an inherited bleeding disorder had an LGN-IUS removed due to poor patient satisfaction, malposition, or expulsion. Further studies into the causes of higher complication rates and interventions such as premedication or prolonged treatment with antifibrinolytic agents targeted at improving outcomes in this population are required.

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