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Cost-effectiveness of recombinant activated factor VII vs. plasma-derived activated prothrombin complex concentrate in the treatment of mild-to-moderate bleeding episodes in patients with severe haemophilia A and inhibitors in Spain

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Summary

Several analyses have shown that recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) is a cost-effective intervention compared with plasma-derived activated prothrombin complex concentrate (pd-aPCC) for the on-demand treatment of mild-to-moderate bleeds in haemophilia patients with inhibitors. The aim of the study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of rFVIIa vs. pd-aPCC in the treatment of bleeding episodes in severe haemophilia A patients with inhibitors in Spain. A decision analytic model was designed to evaluate the costs and clinical outcomes of using rFVIIa or pd-aPCC to treat mild-to-moderate joint bleeds in children (≤14 years old) and adults with inhibitors. Data were obtained from a published meta-analysis and a panel of haemophilia experts. The analysis was conducted from the perspective of the Spanish National Healthcare System. One-way sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the impact of model assumptions on study results. In the Treur meta-analysis, rFVIIa resulted in cumulative joint bleed resolution of 88% and 95% after 24 and 36 h, respectively, compared with 62% and 76%, respectively, with pd-aPCC (Treur et al. Haemophilia 2009; 15: 420–36). Here, the mean cost per bleed was estimated at €8473 and €15 579 in children and adults treated with rFVIIa, vs. €8627 and €15 677 in children and adults treated with pd-aPCC. rFVIIa treatment was found to be the dominating option (cheaper and more effective). The one-way sensitivity analysis also confirmed that rFVIIa was less costly than pd-aPCC. The model suggests that rFVIIa is a cost-effective option compared with pd-aPCC for the treatment of mild-to-moderate bleeding episodes in a Spanish setting.

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