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Desmopressin (DDAVP) in the management of patients with congenital bleeding disorders

Authors

  • C. Leissinger,

    Corresponding author
    1. Section of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA
    • Correspondence: Cindy Leissinger, MD, Chief of the Hematology/Oncology Section, Department of Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine, 1430 Tulane Avenue, SL78 New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.

      Tel.: 504 988 5433; fax: 504 988 3508;

      e-mail: cleissi@tulane.edu

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  • M. Carcao,

    1. Division of Haematology/Oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
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  • J. C. Gill,

    1. Pediatric Hematology, Medicine and Epidemiology, The Medical College of Wisconsin and the Blood Center of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA
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  • J. Journeycake,

    1. Pediatrics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA
    2. Bleeding Disorders and Thrombosis Program, Children's Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA
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  • T. Singleton,

    1. Section of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA
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  • L. Valentino

    1. Section of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Rush Hemophilia & Thrombophilia Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA
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Summary

Bleeding disorders, including haemophilia, von Willebrand disease, and platelet function abnormalities pose a substantial, ongoing management challenge. Patients with these disorders not only require treatment during bleeding events but also need effective management strategies to prepare for events ranging from minor dental procedures to major surgery and childbirth. Moreover, women with bleeding disorders often require ongoing treatment to prevent menorrhagia during childbearing years. Desmopressin (DDAVP), a synthetic derivative of the antidiuretic hormone l-arginine vasopressin, has become a well-established tool for the management of patients with bleeding disorders in a variety of clinical settings. However, despite the widespread use of DDAVP, the available clinical evidence on its efficacy and safety in these settings is limited, and there has not been a recent comprehensive review of its role in the clinical management of patients with bleeding disorders. As such, this article provides a review of the mechanism of action and pharmacokinetic properties of DDAVP, followed by a concise summary of the available evidence for its use in the treatment and prevention of bleeding.

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