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Keywords:

  • arthropathy;
  • bone mineral density;
  • bone turnover markers;
  • haemophilia;
  • oestradiol;
  • osteoporosis

Summary

Haemophilia A and B have been associated with increased prevalence of low bone mineral density (BMD). However, the utility of bone turnover markers (BTM) remains unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate bone metabolism in men with haemophilia and to investigate associations between BTM and bone disease. Serum N- (NTX-I), C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX-I) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase band-5b (TRAP-5b), as bone resorption markers, and osteocalcin (OC) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (b-ALP), as bone formation markers, were assessed. Seventy men with haemophilia A (n = 59) or B (n = 11) were studied. Patients with low BMD had significantly higher b-ALP concentrations compared with those with normal BMD (12.8 ± 1.60 vs. 9.72 ± 0.58 μg/L, P = 0.009), without any differences in the other BTM. NTX-I and CTX-I concentrations were negatively associated with oestradiol levels and hip BMD and positively with human immunodeficiency virus infection, number of affected joints and arthropathy scores. B-ALP and OC concentrations were negatively associated with hip BMD, severity of haemophilia and fracture history, and positively with the number of affected joints and testosterone concentrations. After multivariate analysis, NTX-I levels remained negatively associated with oestradiol levels, whereas b-ALP concentrations negatively correlated with the level of physical activity and positively with the number of affected joints. Increased bone metabolism exists in men with haemophilia and low BMD. Increased b-ALP levels may identify patients at high risk for fracture. Increased number of target joints, low physical activity and low oestradiol concentrations are independently associated with increased bone metabolism.