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Abstract

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  2. Abstract
  3. Career Counseling
  4. Career Planning
  5. Placement

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Career Counseling

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  2. Abstract
  3. Career Counseling
  4. Career Planning
  5. Placement

Hughes, A. N., Gibbons, M. M., & Mynatt, B.Using Narrative Career Counseling with the Underprepared College Student. Career Development Quarterly, 2013, 61 (March) pp. 40-49.

Narrative career counseling can help underprepared college students make an informed career decision. In contrast to traditional trait-and-factor approach to career counseling, the counselor and client work together to construct and reconstruct the client's life story, identifying themes, roles, and points of indecision through this process. The model consists of six steps: (1) defining the problem and setting the goal for counseling, (2) encouraging the clients' exploration of important life roles and domains using qualitative techniques, (3) encouraging the clients to view their stories from multiple perspectives, (4) putting the problem into a new perspective based on the retold story from the third step, (5) identifying concrete activities related to the new story, and (6) applying the new skills to the clients' lives. By using this life design approach, counselors can help underprepared students address career-related issues that are unrelated to career choice. (30 ref)—Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling, University of Tennessee.

Tirpak, D. M., & Schlosser, L. Z.Evaluating FOCUS-2's Effectiveness in Enhancing First-Year College Students' Social Cognitive Career Development. Career Development Quarterly, 2013, 61 (June) pp. 110-123.

In a study examining the effectiveness of a computer-assisted career guidance system (FOCUS-2), 420 first-year college students completed pretest–posttest measures of the Assessment of Attributions for Career Decision Making (AACRM) and the Career Decision Self-Efficacy (CDSE) scale. By using FOCUS-2, college students can explore career options and engage in the self-assessment of their interests, personality, skills, and values. The use of FOCUS-2 was positively associated with gains on the CDSE problem-solving scale and the adoption of a more pessimistic style of career decision-making on the AACRM. (52 ref)—Department of Professional Psychology and Family Therapy, Seton Hall University.

Career Planning

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Career Counseling
  4. Career Planning
  5. Placement

Burns, J. N., et al. Academic Support Services and Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy in Student Athletes. Career Development Quarterly, 2013, 61 (June) pp. 161-167.

At two universities, 158 student-athletes, playing for 11 different National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I teams, were required to take part in academic support programs involving career exploration and development during their freshman and sophomore years. The student-athletes completed measures of locus of control, general self-efficacy, satisfaction with academic support services, and confidence in career decision-making tasks. The student-athletes who were more satisfied with the academic support services had higher levels of career decision-making self-efficacy. This relationship was stronger for the student-athletes with a more external locus of control and a lower level of general self-efficacy. These findings indicate that career development programming benefits student-athletes who lack faith in their ability to be successful and who attribute outcomes to external factors. (18 ref)—Department of Psychology, Wright State University.

Placement

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Career Counseling
  4. Career Planning
  5. Placement

Recruitment

Nicholson, Amanda G.Applying the Golden Rule to Recruitment Effectiveness. NACE Journal, 2013, 53 (May) pp. 26-30.

Recruiters and college student applicants were asked for their opinion of the positive variables that cause undergraduate business students to seek an initial interview with retail companies. According to the recruiters, company- and job-related attributes were most important. In contrast, the students placed just as much importance on attributes related to the recruiter, such as how well the recruiter knew the school and whether the recruiter was an alumnus. Based on these findings, employers should consider using the same recruitment team over a long period of time at a particular school and place greater emphasis on the recruiter's relationship to the school. (9 ref)—Whitman School of Management, Syracuse University.