Headache Medicine Meets Neuro-Ophthalmology: Exam Techniques and Challenging Cases

Authors

  • Deborah I. Friedman MD, MPH,

    1. Department of Neurology & Neurotherapeutics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA
    2. Department of Ophthalmology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA
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  • Kathleen B. Digre MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Ophthalmology, Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
    • Department of Neurology, Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
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  • Conflict of Interest: No conflict.
  • Financial Support: This study was supported in part by an unrestricted grant from Research to Prevent Blindness, Inc., New York, New York, US, to the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.

Address all correspondence to K.B. Digre, Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, 65 Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84132, USA, email: Kathleen.digre@hsc.utah.edu

Abstract

The neuro-ophthalmology examination is critical to anyone who sees patients with the common symptom of headache. By examining the visual acuity, pupils, visual fields, motility, and fundus, clues to both secondary causes of headache and primary headaches exist. In this review, we discuss how to do the neuro-ophthalmology examination and we review cases of primary and secondary headache where key features of the examination assisted in making the correct diagnosis.

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