Vascular Risk in Migraineurs: Interaction of Endothelial and Cortical Excitability Factors

Authors

  • Natalia Murinova MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, University of Washington Medical Center and Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA
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  • Daniel L. Krashin MD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Washington Medical Center and Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA
    2. Department of Pain & Anesthesia, University of Washington Medical Center and Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA
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  • Sylvia Lucas MD, PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurology, University of Washington Medical Center and Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA
    2. Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington Medical Center and Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA
    3. Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington Medical Center and Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA
    • Address all correspondence to Sylvia Lucas, University of Washington, Neurology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 356097, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.

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  • Conflicts of Interest: SL has received research funding from MAP/Allergan, St. Jude Medical, Inc., BiogenIdec, and the Wadsworth Foundation; honoraria or advisory fees from Zogenix, MAP/Allergan, BiogenIdec, Novartis, Sanofi/Genzyme, and Allozyne. NM and DK have no COI to report.

Abstract

Background

Migraine is a common primary headache disorder occurring predominantly in a young, relatively healthy population.

Results

There is a growing literature on associations between migraine, especially migraine with aura, and ischemic stroke as well as other vascular events. Migraine as a risk factor for vascular disease and connections between migraine and endothelial, structural, and genetic risk are reviewed.

Conclusion

There may be an interaction between endothelial dysfunction and cortical spreading depression affecting risk. Patient education and treatment of modifiable risk factors may decrease future vascular events.

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