• HCV treatment adherence;
  • HIV treatment adherence;
  • HIV/HCV coinfection


Many HIV-infected patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection do not receive treatment for HCV infection, often because of contraindications or poor adherence to anti-HIV therapy. The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing guideline-based HCV treatment initiation in a large cohort of HIV/HCV-coinfected patients.


Between 2005 and 2011, 194 (40.5%) of 479 coinfected patients not previously treated for HCV infection started this treatment based on current recommendations, i.e. a Metavir score > F1 for liver fibrosis; HCV genotype 2 or 3 infection; or HCV genotype 1 or 4 infection and low HCV viral load (< 800 000 IU/mL), whatever the fibrosis score. Clinical and biological data were compared between patients who started HCV therapy during follow-up and those who did not.


In multivariate analyses, good adherence to treatment for HIV infection, as judged by the patient's physician, was associated with HCV treatment initiation [odds ratio (OR) 2.37; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17–4.81; P = 0.017], whereas patients with children (OR 0.53; 95% CI 0.30–0.91; P = 0.022) and those with cardiovascular disease or respiratory distress (OR 0.10; 95% CI 0.01–0.78; P = 0.03) were less likely to be treated.


Adherence to treatment for HIV infection, as judged by the patient's physician, appears to have a major influence on the decision to begin treatment for HCV infection in coinfected patients. This calls for specific therapeutic education and adherence support in order to ensure timely anti-HCV therapy in this population.