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Nest predators of southeast Asian evergreen forest birds identified through continuous video recording

Authors

  • Andrew J. Pierce,

    Corresponding author
    • Conservation Ecology Program, School of Bioresources, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10150, Thailand
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  • Korakoch Pobprasert

    1. Conservation Ecology Program, School of Bioresources, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10150, Thailand
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Erratum Volume 155, Issue 3, 708, Article first published online: 18 June 2013

Corresponding author.

Email: andyp67@gmail.com

Abstract

Using continuous video recording, we identified predation as the main cause of nest failure of understorey-nesting birds in an intact evergreen forest in northeastern Thailand. Our dataset of 87 predation events is the largest recorded in the tropics. The main predators were macaques (n = 38; 43.7%), nocturnal snakes (n = 19; 21.8%), non-raptorial birds (n = 12; 13.8%), raptors (n = 6; 6.9%), squirrels (n = 5; 5.7%) and tree shrews (n = 4; 4.6%). The two most important predators, Pig-tailed Macaque Macaca nemistrina and Green Cat Snake Boiga cinerea, showed no preference for nest type, nest stage or nest height and we found no difference in their relative predation rates among years. Predation was predominantly diurnal (73.6%), suggesting that visual cues may be important for predators at this site.

Ancillary