Get access

Spatial niche partitioning of two saproxylic sibling species (Coleoptera, Cetoniidae, genus Gnorimus)

Authors

  • Marco Trizzino,

    Corresponding author
    1. Istituto Oikos, Conservation and Management of Natural Resources, Milan, Italy
    2. Department of Theoretical & Applied Sciences, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy
    • Correspondence: Marco Trizzino, Università degli Studi dell'Insubria, Dipartimento di Scienze Teoriche & Applicate, Unità di Analisi e Gestione delle Risorse Ambientali – Guido Tosi Research Group, via H. Dunant, 3 – 21100 Varese, Italy. E-mail: marcotrizzino@tiscali.it

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Francesco Bisi,

    1. Istituto Oikos, Conservation and Management of Natural Resources, Milan, Italy
    2. Department of Theoretical & Applied Sciences, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Carlo E. Morelli,

    1. Department of Theoretical & Applied Sciences, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Damiano G. Preatoni,

    1. Department of Theoretical & Applied Sciences, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lucas A. Wauters,

    1. Department of Theoretical & Applied Sciences, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Adriano Martinoli

    1. Department of Theoretical & Applied Sciences, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

  1. Knowledge on ecological requirements of species is a focal point for their conservation, especially if they live in threatened habitat types such as old-growth forests.
  2. We predict that habitat requirements shape the spatial niche partition of two sibling species of saproxylic beetles Gnorimus nobilis and Gnorimus variabilis.
  3. To test our hypothesis, we conducted a comparative study on the presence and abundance of these chafer beetles in northern Apennines using air-trapping, exploring the effects of altitude and habitat type.
  4. We performed our analyses in a study area of 268 800 ha, where we detected nine patches of putatively suitable habitat (13 347 ha), setting a total of 82 air-traps.
  5. We collected an unexpected high number of specimens of both species, and found that G. nobilis and G. variabilis are rarely syntopic, having different ecological preferences influenced primarily by altitude, but also by forest type.
Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary