International Journal of Cosmetic Science

Cover image for Vol. 36 Issue 1

February 2014

Volume 36, Issue 1

Pages 1–115

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
    1. Editorial (page 1)

      Dr. Karl Lintner and Dr. Majella Lane

      Version of Record online: 10 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/ics.12110

  2. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      An overview of chemical straightening of human hair: technical aspects, potential risks to hair fibre and health and legal issues (pages 2–11)

      A. L. Miranda-Vilela, A. J. Botelho and L. A. Muehlmann

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ics.12093

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hair straighteners stand out with a high demand by costumers aiming at beauty, social acceptance and ease of daily hair maintenance. However, this kind of treatment affects the chemical structure of keratin and of the hair fiber, bringing up some safety concerns. Thus, important information, such as the composition and structure of the hair fibers, and the composition of products and techniques available for hair straightening, must be taken into account so that the straightening process can be designed appropriately, avoiding undesirable side effects for hair fiber and for health.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Utilization of carboxymethyl chitosan in cosmetics (pages 12–21)

      A. Jimtaisong and N. Saewan

      Version of Record online: 6 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ics.12102

  3. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Review Articles
    4. Original Articles
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Wrinkle reduction in post-menopausal women consuming a novel oral supplement: a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized study (pages 22–31)

      G. Jenkins, L. J. Wainwright, R. Holland, K. E. Barrett and J. Casey

      Version of Record online: 18 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ics.12087

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect on skin wrinkling, of a combination of ingredients reported to influence key factors involved in skin ageing, namely inflammation, collagen synthesis and oxidative/UV stress. A supplemented drink was therefore developed containing soy isoflavones, lycopene, vitamin C and vitamin E and given to post-menopausal women with a capsule containing fish oil. We have then demonstrated a clinically measureable improvement in the depth of facial wrinkles following long term use.

    2. Role of copper in photochemical damage to hair (pages 32–38)

      J. M. Marsh, R. Iveson, M. J. Flagler, M. G. Davis, A. B. Newland, K. D. Greis, Y. Sun, T. Chaudhary and E. R. Aistrup

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ics.12088

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      Copper induces acceleration in UV damage to hair. Chelants such as EDDS can reduce this damage by selectively removing copper from hair.

    3. Effect of detergents on the physicochemical properties of skin stratum corneum: a two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy study (pages 39–45)

      M. Bloksgaard, J. R. Brewer, E. Pashkovski, K. P. Ananthapadmanabhan, J. A. Sørensen and L. A. Bagatolli

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ics.12089

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Short time repeated exposure of excised skin to synthetic cleanser mix increases the in-depth hydration properties of the SC extracellular lipid matrix. This situation is different in the case of SDS, where hydration changes are confined only to the SC surface. These changes in hydration are induced without substantial variations in the average apparent pH of the SC, and this last effect is independent of the nature of the detergent.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Protease activity, localization and inhibition in the human hair follicle (pages 46–53)

      R. K. Bhogal, P. E. Mouser, C. A. Higgins and G. A. Turner

      Version of Record online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ics.12091

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      Protease activity in the human hair follicle.

    5. Determination of the influence of factors (ethanol, pH and aw) on the preservation of cosmetics using experimental design (pages 54–61)

      H. Berthele, O. Sella, M. Lavarde, C. Mielcarek, A.-M. Pense-Lheritier and S. Pirnay

      Version of Record online: 8 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ics.12094

    6. Application of D-optimal experimental design method to optimize the formulation of O/W cosmetic emulsions (pages 79–87)

      J. Djuris, D. Vasiljevic, S. Jokic and S. Ibric

      Version of Record online: 11 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ics.12099

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Effects of lipophilic co-emulsifier type and concentration were investigated on the rheological properties, values of pH and specific conductivity of cosmetic O/W emulsions stabilized by using low level concentration (1%) of emulsifier cetearyl glucoside through application of D-optimal mixture experimental design. The aqueous phase was fixed at 70%, level of emulsifier was fixed at 1%. Stearic acid, cetyl and stearyl alcohol and glyceryl stearate were selected as lipophilic co-emulsifiers.

    7. Skin viscoelasticity during hormone replacement therapy for climacteric ageing (pages 88–92)

      G. E. Piérard, T. Hermanns-Lê, P. Paquet and C. Piérard-Franchimont

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ics.12100

    8. Immediate and extended effects of sodium lauryl sulphate exposure on stratum corneum natural moisturizing factor (pages 93–101)

      D. R. Hoffman, L. M. Kroll, A. Basehoar, B. Reece, C. T. Cunningham and D. W. Koenig

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ics.12101

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      Surfactant-induced skin barrier disruption yields differential effects on stratum corneum natural moisturizing factor (NMF) components. Here we report NMF components principally derived from filaggrin and/or other S100-proteins are more impacted than those derived from other sources such as sweat and urea cycling.

    9. Thermoregulatory vs. event sweating – comparison of clinical methodologies, physiology and results (pages 102–108)

      S. J. Biehle-Hulette, J. M. Krailler, L. T. Elstun, S. Bentz, K. W. Benzing, R. D. Spruell, J. Hellhammer and D. F. Swaile

      Version of Record online: 27 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ics.12103

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      This article compares clinical studies and results for thermoregulatory vs. event (or stress) sweat. Significant protection from each cause of perspiration is seen, with higher overall sweat reduction observed for the stress sweat scenario. A discussion of the physiology and implications of the results is included.

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