Lack of IgG antibody seropositivity to Borrelia burgdorferi in patients with Parry–Romberg syndrome and linear morphea en coup de sabre in Mexico

Authors

  • Claudia Gutiérrez-Gómez MD,

    1. Graduate Studies Division, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and General Hospital “Dr. Manuel Gea González”, Mexico City, Mexico
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  • Ana L. Godínez-Hana MD,

    1. Center for Research and Development in Health Sciences (CIDICS), Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (UANL), Monterrey, Mexico
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  • Marisela García-Hernández PhD,

    1. Center for Research and Development in Health Sciences (CIDICS), Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (UANL), Monterrey, Mexico
    2. Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine Department, School of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (UANL), Monterrey, Mexico
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  • María de Lourdes Suárez-Roa MD,

    1. Research Service, General Hospital “Dr. Manuel Gea González”, Mexico City, Mexico
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  • Sonia Toussaint-Caire MD,

    1. Dermatology Service, General Hospital “Dr. Manuel Gea González”, Mexico City, Mexico
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  • Elisa Vega-Memije MD,

    1. Dermatology Service, General Hospital “Dr. Manuel Gea González”, Mexico City, Mexico
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  • Daniela Gutiérrez-Mendoza MD,

    1. Dermatology Service, General Hospital “Dr. Manuel Gea González”, Mexico City, Mexico
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  • Marcia Pérez-Dosal MD,

    1. Graduate Studies Division, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and General Hospital “Dr. Manuel Gea González”, Mexico City, Mexico
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  • Carlos E. Medina-De la Garza MD, PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Research and Development in Health Sciences (CIDICS), Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (UANL), Monterrey, Mexico
    2. Immunology Department, School of Medicine and University Hospital “Dr. José E. González”, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (UANL), Monterrey, Mexico
    • Correspondence

      Carlos E. Medina-De la Garza, md, phd

      Center for Research and Development in Health Sciences (CIDICS), UANL. Av. Carlos Canseco S/N esquina con Av. Gonzalitos, Mitras Centro, Monterrey, NL, CP 64460, Mexico

      E-mail: carlos.medina@uanl.mx

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  • Conflicts of interest: None.

Abstract

Background

Progressive hemifacial atrophy or Parry–Romberg Syndrome (PRS) is a rare, acquired, progressive dysplasia of subcutaneous tissue and bone characterized by unilateral facial involvement. Its etiology is unknown, but theories about its pathogenesis include infectious, degenerative, autoimmune, and traumatic causes among others. The causal relationship of PRS and linear morphea en coup de sabre (LMCS) with Borrelia burgdorferi infection remains controversial. Our goal was to serologically determine anti-B. burgdorferi antibodies in patients diagnosed with PRS and LMCS to establish a possible association as a causative agent.

Methods

We conducted a serology study with patients belonging to a group of 21 individuals diagnosed with PRS, six with LMCS, and 21 matched controls. Anti-Borrelia IgG antibodies were determined by ELISA. A descriptive statistical analysis and Fischer's exact test were done.

Results

In serological tests, only two cases had borderline values and were further analyzed by Western blot with non-confirmatory results. For both the PRS and LMCS group, the association test was not significant, suggesting a lack of association between PRS or LMCS and the presence of anti-Borrelia antibodies.

Conclusion

In Mexico there are no previous studies on Borrelia infection and its relationship between PRS or LMCS. Our result showed a lack of association of either clinical entities with anti-Borrelia-antibodies. Former reports of this association may suggest coincidental findings without causal relationship.

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