Get access

Rheological and sensory attributes of cream caramel desserts containing fructooligosaccharides as substitute sweeteners

Authors

  • Styliani V. Protonotariou,

    1. Laboratory of Engineering, Processing and Preservation of Foods, Department of Food Science and Technology, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos, 11855 Athens, Greece
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Euagelia Karali,

    1. Laboratory of Engineering, Processing and Preservation of Foods, Department of Food Science and Technology, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos, 11855 Athens, Greece
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Vasiliki Evageliou,

    1. Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Analysis, Department of Food Science and Technology, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos, 11855 Athens, Greece
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Stavros Yanniotis,

    1. Laboratory of Engineering, Processing and Preservation of Foods, Department of Food Science and Technology, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos, 11855 Athens, Greece
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ioanna Mandala

    Corresponding author
    • Laboratory of Engineering, Processing and Preservation of Foods, Department of Food Science and Technology, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos, 11855 Athens, Greece
    Search for more papers by this author

Correspondent: Fax: +30 (210) 524697;

e-mail: imandala@aua.gr

Summary

The objectives of this research were to substitute (10–50%) sucrose with fructooligosaccharides (FOS) in cream caramel dessert and to study the rheological and sensory characteristics of the gels produced. Small deformation experiments showed that the substitution of sucrose with FOS led to a decrease in the solid character of the gels. Moreover, samples in which sucrose was substituted with 20% and 30% FOS exhibited lower gel strength, and sample containing 30% FOS showed more than three times lower gel strength than that with 100% sucrose. However, all samples, albeit fluids, already had a substantial gel-like character at high temperature. According to large deformation experiments, the strength and rigidity of all samples increased with storage time. The values for both parameters were greater for the samples containing 100% and 90% sucrose. Triangle tests were performed for sensory evaluation. Panellists did not find significant differences in terms of sweetness when sucrose was substituted up to 30%. Storage was significant only for the sample with 100% sucrose, as the sensory characteristics of the sample with 10% FOS were not affected.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary