Effect of the time of cold maceration on the evolution of phenolic compounds and colour of Syrah wines elaborated in warm climate

Authors

  • María Jesús Cejudo-Bastante,

    1. Food Colour and Quality Laboratory, Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain
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  • Belén Gordillo,

    1. Food Colour and Quality Laboratory, Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain
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  • Dolores Hernanz,

    1. Department of Analytical Chemistry, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain
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  • María Luisa Escudero-Gilete,

    1. Food Colour and Quality Laboratory, Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain
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  • Maria Lourdes González-Miret,

    1. Food Colour and Quality Laboratory, Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain
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  • Francisco J. Heredia

    Corresponding author
    1. Food Colour and Quality Laboratory, Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain
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Summary

The effect of different cold maceration times on Syrah red wines from warm climate has been evaluated. Differential colorimetry and tristimulus colorimetry were applied to colour data at different points of the vinification stage. Virtually, all the phenolic compounds showed significantly higher content in cold macerated wines, even more when longer contact time was used. Long cold macerated (LCM) wines had the significantly (< 0.05) highest chroma values (C*ab) and lowest of lightness (L*) and hue (hab). Unexpectedly, wines submitted to short-time cold maceration (SCM) presented the lowest chroma values, even significantly inferior to that observed in traditional macerated (TM) wines. Moreover, colour changes (ΔE*ab) between TM and SCM were mainly quantitative (%Δ2L and %Δ2C), whereas they were also qualitative when compared TM with LCM (%Δ2C and %Δ2H). Cold maceration in warm climates characterised by common colour losses must be carefully employed because undesirable consequences on colour may occur.

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