Get access

Student feedback on teaching: Some issues for consideration for nurse educators

Authors

  • Michelle Cleary RN PhD,

    Associate Professor, Corresponding author
    • Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Brenda Happell RN PhD,

    Professor
    1. Institute for Health and Social Science Research, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Siew Tiang Lau RN MHSc(Ed),

    Senior Lecturer
    1. Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sandra Mackey RN PhD

    Senior Lecturer
    1. School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author

Correspondence: Michelle Cleary, Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, Level 2, Clinical Research Centre, Block MD11, 10 Medical Drive, Singapore 117597. Email: michelle_cleary@nuhs.edu.sg

Abstract

In this paper, we outline some key points about student feedback for nurse educators to consider. For nursing students, providing feedback offers an opportunity to communicate whether relevant and effective learning has occurred. Given the importance of student feedback for the quality of learning and teaching, and the significant resources invested in it, it is essential that accurate feedback is obtained and responded to by nurse educators. The aim of this paper, therefore, is to present an overview of factors influencing the quality and reliability of student feedback of their theoretical and clinical learning experiences, and ways the feedback might be used by educators for improving teaching and career enhancement. Nurse educators need to be prepared to respond to well-intentioned feedback without undue defensiveness to ensure good and effective teaching. Ultimately, feedback systems that are well managed should benefit nursing students, nurse educators and their respective institutions.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary