Sleep–wake activity rhythm and health-related quality of life among patients with coronary artery disease and in a population-based sample—An actigraphy and questionnaire study

Authors

  • Anna Johansson RN PhD,

    Nurse, Corresponding author
    1. Department of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Linköping, Sweden
    2. Department of Health Care Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Sweden
    • Department of Cardiology, Skaraborgs Hospital, Skövde, Sweden
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  • Eva Svanborg MD PhD,

    Professor
    1. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine Linköping University Hospital, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Linköping, Sweden
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  • Ulla Edéll-Gustafsson CCRN PhD

    Professor
    1. Department of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Linköping, Sweden
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Correspondence: Anna Johansson, Department of Cardiology, unit 32, Skaraborgs Hospital Skövde, SE-541 85 Skövde, Sweden. Email: anna.m.johansson@vgregion.se

Abstract

The aim of this study was to explore whether there are gender differences in sleep and health-related quality of life in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and a matched population-based sample and to see how subjectively rated sleep is associated with actigraphy. Secondly, to explore whether factors that predict patients' sleep quality could be identified. Fifty-seven patients with stable CAD and 47 participants from a population-based sample were included. All participants completed the Uppsala Sleep Inventory (USI), the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the SF-36. Actigraphy recordings and a sleep diary were performed for seven 24-h periods. Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that sleep duration, sleep onset latency, nocturnal awakenings, vitality (SF-36) and body mass index explained 60% of the sleep quality outcome (USI). Sleep duration, sleep efficiency and fragmentation index assessed with actigraphy and sleep diary accounted for 36% of the sleep quality outcome (diary). The result can form the basis for a non-pharmacological, self-care programme supported and led by nurses.

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