The implementation of intentional rounding using participatory action research

Authors

  • Ann Harrington RN DNE B.Ed M.Ng PhD FACN,

    Associate Professor, Corresponding author
    • School of Nursing & Midwifery, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
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  • Sandra Bradley RN BSc B.Arts BN Grad Cert (Higher Ed) M.Sc (Research) FACN,

    PhD Candidate
    1. Palliative and Supportive Services, School of Medicine, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
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  • Lesley Jeffers RN BA Grad Dip (PSM) MACN,

    A/Director of Nursing & Patient Services
    1. Repatriation General Hospital, Daw Park, South Australia, Australia
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  • Ecushla Linedale BSc (Hons) Grad Dip Sc Comm,

    Research Assistant
    1. Repatriation General Hospital, Daw Park, South Australia, Australia
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  • Sue Kelman RN BN M.Ng,

    Assoc Clinical Services Coordinator
    1. Repatriation General Hospital, Daw Park, South Australia, Australia
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  • Geoffrey Killington RN BN BA (Hons)

    Associate Lecturer, Associate Clinical Services Coordinator
    1. Repatriation General Hospital, Daw Park, South Australia, Australia
    2. Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
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Correspondence: Ann Harrington, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia. Email: ann.harrington@flinders.edu.au

Abstract

‘Intentional'/‘hourly rounding’ is defined as regular checks of individual patients carried out by health professionals at set intervals rather than a response to a summons via a call bell. Intentional rounding places patients at the heart of the ward routine including the acknowledgement of patient preferences and in anticipation of their needs. The aim of this study was to implement intentional rounding using participatory action research to increase patient care, increase staff productivity and the satisfaction of care provision from both patients and staff. Outcomes of the study revealed a drop in call bell use, no observable threats to patient safety, nursing staff and patient satisfaction with care provision. However, any future studies should consider staff skill mix issues including the needs of newly graduated nursing staff as well as the cognitive status of patients when implementing intentional rounding on acute care wards.

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